Andy Warhol

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Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Thu Dec 01, 2011 6:30 am

Hey, Nash! Your manor...
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Andy Warhol comes to Dulwich Picture Gallery in 2012

The London gallery will show more than 80 works by the American artist

Mark Brown
guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 30 November 2011 18.22 GMT


Warhol's works will have to be hung densely, given the scale of the Dulwich Picture Gallery. Photograph: David Sillitoe for the Guardian

It will be the works of Andy Warhol but not as they have been seen before, with his subjects – from soup cans to Superman – displayed in the 18th-century tradition by one of the UK's oldest public art galleries.

The 200-year-old Dulwich Picture Galleryin south London announced its plans for next year, which will include a summer exhibition of more than 80 works from Warhol's portfolio series hanging in a way that the gallery's founding fathers would have approved of – densely.

The gallery's director, Ian Dejardin, said people were used to seeing Warhol in big white rooms but this was just not possible at Dulwich. The works would be hung in a more crowded way.

"We have to," he said. "Our exhibition spaces are converted from old almshouses and they are gold – to have spaces that have a very domestic feel to them and a particular scale focuses the mind. My idea of hell would have to be one of these great white box exhibition spaces that you can do anything in – because the temptation is to then do anything in."

He said he expected the Warhol prints to fit in brilliantly, "they are so fabulously decorative". When Dejardin he saw them in the US, he thought immediately of the sugar-coated 18th-century French artist François Boucher.

Warhol's portfolio prints come in groups of 10 and cover themes such as Myths (including Superman) and Endangered Species (a bald eagle, for example) and Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth Century (including Golda Meir).

The prints are all from the Bank of America Lynch collection and while they have toured the US, this will be the first time the show has been in the UK.

The show will be on during the Olympics and Dejardin said Warhol ticked all his boxes. "It makes sense to have the biggest possible name that appeals to the broadest possible audience, because who knows who this audience is? There will be a huge influx of tourists coming to London because it is suddenly in the news."

Dulwich Picture Gallery, which receives no public subsidy and relies on its commercial enterprises and philanthropy, is celebrating its 200th anniversary and while Dejardin said it had been a "remarkable year" he regarded it as a "stepping stone, a way forward, the beginning of our next 200 years".

Other highlights in 2012 include the first show exploring a less well known period in the life of Van Dyck, when he was stranded in Palermo, Sicily, in 1624-25, when most of the island's population was killed by the plague. That show will open in February.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Wed Dec 07, 2011 7:57 pm


Andy Warhol- Jack Mitchell.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Wed Dec 07, 2011 7:59 pm


Campbell's Soup, 1968.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Wed Dec 07, 2011 8:01 pm


Marilyn.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Wed Dec 07, 2011 8:03 pm


Chaiman Mao.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Wed Dec 07, 2011 8:04 pm


John Lennon.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Wed Dec 07, 2011 8:06 pm


QEII.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Wed Dec 07, 2011 8:08 pm


Velvet Underground and Nico album cover.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Wed Dec 07, 2011 8:12 pm


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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Wed Dec 07, 2011 8:15 pm


Elvis.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Wed Dec 07, 2011 8:20 pm


Sticky Fingers- Rolling Stones album cover.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Wed Dec 07, 2011 8:22 pm


Cow.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Wed Dec 07, 2011 8:26 pm


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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Wed Dec 07, 2011 8:30 pm


Muhammad Ali.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Wed Dec 07, 2011 8:32 pm


Jackie Kennedy.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Wed Dec 07, 2011 8:34 pm


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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Wed Dec 07, 2011 8:36 pm


Andy Warhol's Velvet Underground album cover.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Thu Dec 08, 2011 2:14 am

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=youtube+andy+warhol+david+bowie&docid=1408628686891&mid=4DB08544ACDAE3286EC34DB08544ACDAE3286EC3&FORM=VIRE5#
Andy Warhol- David Bowie.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  felix on Thu Dec 08, 2011 3:05 am

Somewhere on a shelf somewhere in my house there resides a paperback copy of the 1958 novel "The Immortal" by Walter Ross, the central character based on/inspired by James Dean. The cover illustration is by Warhol:

the p/back:

the original:


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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Sat Jan 07, 2012 11:29 pm


Andy Warhol and Candy Darling, New York City, 1969 by Cecil Beaton
'Beaton's celebrities survey the world from behind cool, emotionally impervious faces'. Photograph: Courtesy Cecil Beaton Studio Archive at Sotheby's

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Fri Jan 13, 2012 12:31 am


Peter Duggan's Artoons.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Thu Feb 23, 2012 1:50 pm

Andy Warhol was much more than an icon of modern cool

25 years after his death, a new online film reduces Warhol to trashy cypher – but his art was subtle and profound

Jonathan Jones
The Guardian


Trashy myth ... Akos Armont as Andy Warhol in Andy X. Photograph: Felicity Jenkins

Andy Warhol died a quarter of a century ago today, on 22 February, 1987. He is in no danger of being forgotten. But what, exactly, is he being remembered for?

To mark today's anniversary, a new 40-minute film called Andy X, directed by Jim Sharman, who made the Rocky Horror Picture Show, is being released online. You can pay to watch, or alternatively Facebook users can use friends as currency, which is clearly a very Warholian idea. At least, it's the kind of idea we instantly label "Warholian", without thinking about what it really has to do with Warhol or his art. This is part of the problem when remembering Andy Warhol.

More problems arise when you actually look at Sharman's film. It's a musical. OK. It is not the first quasi-operatic meditation on Warhol; this has been done before, by John Cale and Lou Reed on their album Songs for Drella. The briefly reunited, antagonistic former leaders of Warhol's "pop group" the Velvet Underground had several advantages when it came to devising a musical homage to Warhol. For one thing they knew him personally, and for another, they were (and are) giants of alternative rock. Any comparisons with Andy X are cruel, so I won't labour them.

Leaving aside the film's artistic quality, what it says, or does not say about Warhol is revealing. Andy X is all about the image of Warhol – an image the makers seem to have received from sources ranging from other films to sensationalist biographies, but not from Warhol's own art or writings, nor the analyses of people who knew him. It is, consequently, another regurgitation of empty Andy, glamorous Andy, fame-obsessed Andy.

The real Andy Warhol, behind this trashy myth, produced some of the starkest and most compelling images in 20th-century art. His car crash paintings, screen tests, and late religious works reinventing the Last Supper are serious, incredibly human and compassionate works. Warhol was a true artist who restlessly experimented, invented, and confronted the realities of the modern world. His laconic literary and speaking style is itself a monument of modern American culture, a voice to set among those of novelists from F Scott Fitzgerald onwards, who have captured the brittle beauties of the American dream.

Warhol deserves to be remembered for his subtle and honest art, but he seems fated to be remembered more as an "icon" – reduced to an emblem of modern cool. "I'll be your mirror", as the Velvet Underground sang. Warhol was a mirror, which has always been one of the great functions of art. In the end, it does not matter how many fictions are spun about him; this simple, reflective truth will always wait at the heart of the myth. When you find it, you will know by the tingling of your spine.

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Re: Andy Warhol

Post  eddie on Fri Feb 24, 2012 12:20 am

Andy Warhol's legacy lives on in the factory of fame

15 minutes of fame? The artist whose radical ideas galvanised the 1960s art world continues to dominate the market and permeate popular culture – 25 years after his death

Alex Needham

guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 22 February 2012 10.24 GMT


People are reflected on a portrait of US artist Andy Warhol by Timm Rautert. Photograph: Susana Vera/Reuters

On 22 February 1987, Andy Warhol died unexpectedly in a New York hospital after a routine operation on his gallbladder. Yet 25 years on, the artist described by Truman Capote, quoting Wilde, as "a sphinx without a secret" has never gone away. Not only does Warhol dominate the art market, with his work accounting for one-sixth of contemporary art sales, his influence permeates both high art and popular culture.

Warhol's work is rarely out of circulation in galleries. A show at the De La Warr Pavilion in east Sussex closes this week, but another, of his portfolio prints, starts at Dulwich Picture Gallery in London this summer. The artists he influenced are even more visible. Next month, artist Gillian Wearing, who once photographed herself dressed as Warhol, will show a retrospective of her work at the Whitechapel, while Jeremy Deller, who hung out at Warhol's studio, the Factory, in the summer of 1986, is just about to launch a retrospective at London's Hayward.


Andy Warhol lines up a shot during the filming of Taylor Mead's Ass at his studio, The Factory, New York, 1964. Photograph: Fred W McDarrah/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image

"I think Warhol changed film and documentary forever," says Wearing. "He was completely seminal in that area. His extremely long takes, his exploration of improvisation between fiction and reality came about through his playful and irreverent manner, and gave the world new ways of looking."

Warhol's radical idea that the stuff of modern life could be art, from Campbell's soup cans to washing-powder boxes, galvanised the art world in the 60s. "I went to see his 1989 retrospective at Moma," remembers cultural historian Jon Savage. "You walked into the 60s rooms and there it all was – America. Money, sex, fame, death. Warhol summed, up, defined and in many ways embodied the world in which we now live. Everyone thinks he's emotionless and soulless, but the cumulative effect of seeing all the Marilyns and Orange Disasters is extremely powerful – it's not just a mirror," he says, referring to the verdict of art critic Robert Hughes.


Andy Warhol's Marilyns, from the 2002 exhibition at Tate Modern, London. Photograph: David Sillitoe for the Guardian

Yet it is the sheer range of Warhol's work which has made his influence all-pervasive. As Wearing puts it: "Warhol left his mark in many more ways than his actual work". As well as the paintings, and the films he made of acolytes of the Factory sleeping, taking drugs or, in the case of the self-explanatory Blow Job, receiving oral sex, Warhol created a celebrity magazine, Interview; produced the Velvet Underground's first album; wrote (or dictated) voluminous diaries, and was impresario and mentor to a host of "superstars" – followers who came to find fame, or soak up the atmosphere, and became the subjects of his work.

Stuart Comer, curator of film at Tate Modern, says that the Factory blended people from different backgrounds in a kind of social experiment. "You would have somebody like Valerie Solanas" – the radical feminist writer who shot Warhol in 1968 – "a German countess; a bum from the Bowery and some artists from suburban America who'd come to NY to make it." Deller remembers being inspired by seeing the variety of activities that were happening in the Factory and realising that they were all down to one man, "not a corporation or a big business".


Andy Warhol with Gerard Malanga, The Velvet Underground and Nico. Photograph: Steve Schapiro/ Steve Schapiro/Corbis

"One of Andy's great innovations was realising that the idea of the artist alone in his studio was not a particularly modern one, and that an artist could have a team," says Glenn O'Brien, a journalist who worked with Warhol on Interview. "Today you have artists like Jeff Koons or Damien Hirst who employ hundreds of people – it's a very understandable model for artists. And there are people in other fields like fashion, like Marc Jacobs, who has that sort of entrepeneurial sensibility."

However, it is Warhol's view of fame that seems to have predicted 21st-century culture. In a critique of the Hollywood star system, Warhol turned the likes of the Santa Barbara heiress Edie Sedgwick into celebrities, instinctively grasping decades before YouTube or reality TV that people need not be famous for acting, singing or doing anything other than being themselves.


A visitor views a self portrait, painted in 1986, by American artist Andy Warhol on display in a retropective of his work at The Tate Modern. Photograph: Fiona Hanson/PA

Comer believes that Warhol's famous 1968 statement – "In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes" – showed an intuitive understanding not just of our appetite for stars, but of the way the media would become more pervasive. "He understood that the Hollywood studio system was giving way to something where far more people were going to be on camera and on screen. Now, on CCTV cameras, we're all filmed and photographed thousands of times a day. Warhol realised that we were becoming more than bodies – we were becoming images. The way that we all became part of the media machine is something that he understood very early."

This process has been accelerated by the internet, which Warhol did not live to see. O'Brien says that his "gift for aphorisms" would have made him a natural at Twitter: "Even though he was a man of few words they were always well chosen."

Deller points out that the things the web facillitates best – shopping, gossiping, sharing – were some of the artist's central preoccuptions. "He would have been a master of the internet. He would have set up an auction website, a gossip website, a film sharing website. He was someone who liked to collect images and liked to collect things, and have his finger in a lot of different pies."


Andy Warhol in 1985. Photograph: Ron Galella/WireImage

Deller warns against boiling Warhol down to a preoccupation with money, artifice or celebrity culture, pointing out that "he's a lot more complicated and critical than he gets credit for". After Warhol's death, the art world was shocked by his secret life. He turned out to have been a devout Catholic who visited church every day, though his work was often suffused with sex and drugs: a large strand of it validated queer and trans culture at a time when the gay liberation movement had barely begun.

Warhol's art and ideas remain controversial: last year an article by Brian Appleyard in the Economist predicted that art history would see Warhol restored to "his rightful place – as a briefly brilliant and very poignant recorder of the dazzling surface of where we are now". Yet his influence seems destined to endure for the forseeable future.

"He understood the very core of how industry and society and economics come together," says Comer. "Until capitalism ends, his influence will be irrevocable."

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