Why are there banjos?

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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  pinhedz on Wed Apr 25, 2012 5:55 am

Two taxi drivers talking after a fender-bender:

-- Wasamala you?

-- Wasamala me? Wasamala you wasamala me? You wasamala.

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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  woo on Wed Apr 25, 2012 1:58 pm

.


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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  pinhedz on Thu Apr 26, 2012 12:01 am

Tourists--can't live with 'em, can't live without 'em. Neutral

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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  pinhedz on Sun Dec 23, 2012 12:47 pm

There are banjos to keep 8-year-olds off the streets.


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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  pinhedz on Sun Dec 23, 2012 12:48 pm

The 8-year-old is faster, but for some reason I keep watching this one: scratch


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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  pinhedz on Mon Dec 24, 2012 3:07 am

Taylor Swift has been seen playing banjo--but only in Minneapolis:


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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  pinhedz on Sun Jan 06, 2013 2:06 pm

Fernando Gonzalez sez: "El ragtime un subgenero del jazz, primeras grabaciones"


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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sat Jan 19, 2013 5:06 am

These are real real heady tymez in Professional African Ethnomusicanthrology-- almost seams like every weak we up the steaks in finding the banjo's most analogous and ultimate counterpart from that Dark Continent. And to thimk, once upon a cudgel, the Senegambian Igboo Ubaw-Akwala was considered Ground Zero Founding Frather of the banjos, lol. What was that old Yanfolila Bougouni ditty? "You know big boss be bored if that resonator ain't gourd." (story of my life, eh, lol)






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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Thu Feb 28, 2013 9:13 am

Wha tha shale-frac do those images have to do with banjos for ruckzuck's sake ... And please don't respond with imgs of Magnetic Gypsies with iron wind on the upper neck... Rolling Eyes


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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Thu Feb 28, 2013 9:18 am

o gawd, why I am not slurprized --- do I have to render you an 8-bit map with rest-stops and historical preserved wagon wheels???!!?!?!?

The pictogram is blood simple:

--CLAW--
(followed by)
--HAMMER--

[yep, Pakled Cabal Insnoreporated, it's a super famous banjo technicnique invented by Bob Seger featuring Michael McDonald ]

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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  pinhedz on Fri Apr 26, 2013 1:12 pm

I have withheld the true answer to the question "Why Are There Banjos" until now.

This is the one and only true answer:


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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  pinhedz on Wed Aug 05, 2015 4:58 am

Some try to argue that male people can play banjo, but compared to those girls^
the boys just sound lame:


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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  woo on Tue Nov 15, 2016 11:09 am


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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Nov 15, 2016 11:27 am



i like the funny hat of the funny man


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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  pinhedz on Wed Dec 21, 2016 1:17 pm

Banjo Paterson wrote the words to "Waltzing Mathilda."

The tune was an old march from the Marlborough Wars. What were the Marlborough Wars? scratch


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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Wed Dec 21, 2016 1:52 pm


Also known as the War of the Spanish Succession, Marlborough's Wars (1702-13), fought in Europe and on the Mediterranean, were the last and the bloodiest of the Wars between England and France under Louis XIV, and the first in which Britain played a major military role in European military affairs. In 1700 Louis had antagonized the English by accepting (in defiance of treaties) the bequest of the Spanish empire to his grandson Philip of Anjou, and by his subsequent prohibition of English imports and recognition of the claim to the English throne put forward by James, the "Old Pretender," who was the son of the deposed James II and the leader of the Jacobites. England's Grand Alliance with Holland, the Hapsburg Empire, Hanover, and Prussia, intended to prevent French dominance over all of Europe, was opposed by France, Spain, Bavaria, and Savoy. After the death of William III in 1702, Queen Anne, James's daughter, appointed John Churchill, the earl of Marlborough, as commander of the English and Dutch armies. A brilliant soldier — brave, handsome, skilfull — Marlborough was also opportunistic, crafty, deceptive, and tight-fisted.

During the War Marlborough waged ten successful campaigns, beseiged over thirty towns, and never lost a battle or a skirmish. After his successes in the Netherlands, the Bavarians and the French threatened Vienna and the Austrians, and Marlborough, a master of tactics and strategy, marched 250 miles across Germany and confronted the French army at Blenheim in 1704, destroying two thirds of it and capturing Marshall Tallard, its commander. Thereafter, however, the war dragged on on different fronts — in the Netherlands, Italy, and Spain — but by 1710 the situation was largely stalemated, though the war as a whole had brought Britain into much greater prominence as a European power.

Meanwhile, the cost of the war, a dominant theme in English politics and society during the reign of Queen Anne, had generated considerable political opposition at home, particularly amongst the Tory gentry who were taxed to pay for it: though a common soldier in the British Army earned only sixpence a day, it cost £1,000,000 a year to maintain the army in Europe, and total cost of the war for Britain was close to £9,000,000 per year. The conduct of the war became a political football between the Whigs and the Tories, with the queen in the middle. Marlborough's wife Sarah, long one of Anne's favorites, eventually fell out of favor, and after the Tories came back into power in 1710 Marlborough himself, accused of corruption, was stripped of his offices and went abroad.

Britain had withdrawn from the war for all practical purposes by 1712, and the Treaty of Utrecht, negotiated by the Tory government, was approved by parliament in 1713 — though the Whigs (who represented the mercantile interests which had profited by the war, and who made larger profits by financing it, though in doing so they had created a National Debt which had to be financed by further taxation) regarded it as a betrayal of Britain's allies. By the terms of the treaty France agreed never to unite the crowns of France and Spain, while Britain acquired Hudson's Bay, Arcadia, and Newfoundland from the French, Gibraltar and Minorca from Spain, new trading privileges with Spain, and a monopoly of the slave trade with the Spanish Empire. Marlborough returned to England after Anne's death in 1714 and was restored to some of his former influence under George I.

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Re: Why are there banjos?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri Dec 23, 2016 9:58 am

Minorca wrote:
Also known as the War of the Spanish Succession, Marlborough's Wars (1702-13), fought in Europe and on the Mediterranean, were the last and the bloodiest of the Wars between England and France under Louis XIV, and the first in which Britain played a major military role in European military affairs. In 1700 Louis had antagonized the English by accepting (in defiance of treaties) the bequest of the Spanish empire to his grandson Philip of Anjou, and by his subsequent prohibition of English imports and recognition of the claim to the English throne put forward by James, the "Old Pretender," who was the son of the deposed James II and the leader of the Jacobites. England's Grand Alliance with Holland, the Hapsburg Empire, Hanover, and Prussia, intended to prevent French dominance over all of Europe, was opposed by France, Spain, Bavaria, and Savoy. After the death of William III in 1702, Queen Anne, James's daughter, appointed John Churchill, the earl of Marlborough, as commander of the English and Dutch armies. A brilliant soldier — brave, handsome, skilfull — Marlborough was also opportunistic, crafty, deceptive, and tight-fisted.

During the War Marlborough waged ten successful campaigns, beseiged over thirty towns, and never lost a battle or a skirmish. After his successes in the Netherlands, the Bavarians and the French threatened Vienna and the Austrians, and Marlborough, a master of tactics and strategy, marched 250 miles across Germany and confronted the French army at Blenheim in 1704, destroying two thirds of it and capturing Marshall Tallard, its commander. Thereafter, however, the war dragged on on different fronts — in the Netherlands, Italy, and Spain — but by 1710 the situation was largely stalemated, though the war as a whole had brought Britain into much greater prominence as a European power.

Meanwhile, the cost of the war, a dominant theme in English politics and society during the reign of Queen Anne, had generated considerable political opposition at home, particularly amongst the Tory gentry who were taxed to pay for it: though a common soldier in the British Army earned only sixpence a day, it cost £1,000,000 a year to maintain the army in Europe, and total cost of the war for Britain was close to £9,000,000 per year. The conduct of the war became a political football between the Whigs and the Tories, with the queen in the middle. Marlborough's wife Sarah, long one of Anne's favorites, eventually fell out of favor, and after the Tories came back into power in 1710 Marlborough himself, accused of corruption, was stripped of his offices and went abroad.

Britain had withdrawn from the war for all practical purposes by 1712, and the Treaty of Utrecht, negotiated by the Tory government, was approved by parliament in 1713 — though the Whigs (who represented the mercantile interests which had profited by the war, and who made larger profits by financing it, though in doing so they had created a National Debt which had to be financed by further taxation) regarded it as a betrayal of Britain's allies. By the terms of the treaty France agreed never to unite the crowns of France and Spain, while Britain acquired Hudson's Bay, Arcadia, and Newfoundland from the French, Gibraltar and Minorca from Spain, new trading privileges with Spain, and a monopoly of the slave trade with the Spanish Empire. Marlborough returned to England after Anne's death in 1714 and was restored to some of his former influence under George I.

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Re: Why are there banjos?

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