Newest Jazz Releases

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Newest Jazz Releases

Post  pinhedz on Tue May 03, 2011 10:13 am

TinyMontgomery
Sun Jun 14, 2009 9:14 pm

Here are my most recent favourites (2008/09):

* John Scofield - Piety Street
Marvellous gospel album by master SCO, recorded in the legendary Piety Street studios in New Orleans!

* Marc Ribot's Ceramic Dog - Party Intellectuals
"Is that Jazz?" - I don't know but it's a helluva great rock album with jazz improvisations, the occasional chanson, surf music allusions and a ramshackle Doors cover.

* John Zorn - The Dreamers
Zorn's new band is celebrating easy-going surf music that occasionally drifts into some No Wave explorations.

* Colin Stetson - New History Warfare vol. 1
Incredible solo album by the NY sax player! I never knew you could do these things with a saxophone; the compositions and his playing technique are both close to perfect.

* Mostly Other People do the Killing - Shamokin'!!!!
More NY: Peter Evans' quartet (classical Coleman style, tp/ts/b/dr) is heavily influenced by Ornette Coleman yet sounds so different. Explorations into nearly all styles of jazz and an incredible range of improvisational possibilities. Stunning!

* John McLaughlin - Floating Point
After the Shakti reunion the legendary guitarist turned to Indian music once again. Nothing revolutionary but still a very enjoyable effort.

* Elephant9 - Dodovoodoo
Obscure Norwegian band that is playing some real fusion the way it should be - consequent crossbreed of rock and jazz, lots of Zawinul influences and a good mixture of cooking grooves and sweet melodies.

* Exploding Customer - At your service
Interesting effort in the vein of 'Mostly other people...' - good band with lots of potential.

* James Blood Ulmer - Bad Blood in the City
Successor to the overlooked gem that is 'Birthright'. Blood is delivering the vocals once again and wrote a song cycle about Hurricane Katrina and the aftermath. Very good effort though not as good as 'Birthright'. Recorded @ Piety Street Studios, Nola.

* Joshua Redman - Compass
The 'Young Lions' are growing up and one of them's making very, very interesting music. Joshua's newest record again concentrates on a smaller ensemble and explores the silence between the instruments. Sounds crazy but that's the way I hear it.

* Ravi Coltrane - Blending Times
Forever overshadowed by his father? Not anymore. Since 2002's 'Mad 6' Ravi has become a great player in his own right and a great composer as well. 'Blending times' is just another showcase for his talent and a great post-bop record.

* Wynton Marsalis - He and She
Narrations intertwined with old-fashioned jazz intermezzos: The new Marsalis is as mellow as ever and still very good. Pretty enjoyable album.

* Branford Marsalis Quartet - Metamorphosen
Killer album! Branford is especially great on the soprano and digs his way through incredibly sweet compositions. 'The Blossom of Parting' could be a Wayne Shorter standard and is possibly the highlight of this record.

* Masada Quintet - Stolas. The Book of Angels, vol. 12
I don't know how he does it - Zorn releases about 6-8 records per year(!) and ALL of them are at least very good. This is just an incredible musician and the latest Masada effort is plain great too.

* John Zorn (composer) [Rob Burger, Greg Cohen, Ben Perowsky] - Alhambra Love Songs
Fantastic compositions for a piano trio, empathically played by three Bay area musicians who have worked with Zorn before. If the usual Zorn is too heavy for you check this out - this is literally sweet music.

* Stefano diBattista - Trouble Shootin'
The Italian alto player's latest record is an ambivalent affair. The compositions and performances are great but the studio sound is somewhat muddy and commercial, too pop music oriented which spoils the experience a bit. Still recommended!


TinyMontgomery

BONUS

* Nisennenmondai - Neji-Tori
Japanese "girl group" trio (g, b, dr) playing a cross between electronica, no wave and video game music. Usually filed under Jazz although it's somewhat inappropriate. This could become a favourite of Uzi's!


pinhedz

As one who appears to be on top of the latest, what do you think of Wynton Marsalis' apparent choice to take a backward looking approach? Is he just taking the easy road, and serving the easy-listening market?


Hosni

So Tiny, are you a fan of Mr. Zorn's stellar collaborations with Yamataka Eye? Do they still work together?


powerpete

* Joshua Redman - Compass
The 'Young Lions' are growing up and one of them's making very, very interesting music. Joshua's newest record again concentrates on a smaller ensemble and explores the silence between the instruments. Sounds crazy but that's the way I hear it.

I'll be sure to check this out. I once saw Joshua Redman in concert about 10 years ago, and apart from one of the greatest concerts I've seen, I had two weird experiences there. The first had to do with the opening act, Barbara Dennerlein, a German organ player with her band. The friend who was with me at the concert and I enjoyed her groovy, funky set, but both had the feeling that we had been listening to nothing but noise the moment Joshua Redman and his band began to play. The Dennerlein set just seemed to crumble to ashes.

And then, during the Redman set, the music literally opened a kind of space; a flower-like shape opened above the stage and grew during the concert. And no, we weren't high on anything but the music!! It was an amazing experience.

I hadn't thought about that for a long time, when I saw classical violinist Hilary Hahn in concert twice, two and three years ago and found that her playing opens an even vaster space.

Does this stuff sound crazy, or has anybody else made similar experiences?


TinyMontgomery

pinhedz wrote:As one who appears to be on top of the latest,
what do you think of Wynton Marsalis' apparent choice to take a
backward looking approach? Is he just taking the easy road, and serving
the easy-listening market?
I think it has been pretty common to take a backward looking approach for the last 30+ years. So-called purists thought it would harm the integrity of jazz back then - like they did when BeBop, Cool Jazz, Free Jazz and Fusion first came up. It's still pretty common these days - check out Stefano DiBattista, he's basically playing BeBop mixed with Soul Jazz - and I don't really mind it.

No-one could ever copy Charlie Parker, John Coltrane or Charles Mingus. If someone decides to play similarly they will nevertheless come up with something entirely different. It's what makes music so great.

I don't think of Wynton Marsalis as one of the really big names though. David Murray, Joshua Redman, John Zorn or Peter Evans have played some very traditional jazz music and much better than Wynton. He's not bad but I can't listen to most of his music because it seems to be a bit sterile. His later works, however, especially his collaboration with Willie Nelson and "He & She", are very different and I can appreciate this kind of music. I think it's more genuine.

The trouble with modernizing jazz music is based on the same problem that Arnold Schoenberg and Ivan Stravinsky had around 1910 when they tried to find new material for composed/"classical" music. The same problem that Stockhausen and Boulez had around 1955. After some point the musical material can only be modified by "merging" old ideas - technical ideas, musical ideas, stylistic ideas, performance ideas, attitude ideas, you name it - and it's simply not possible to play more "freely", more "out of tune" or more radically just like that. I think there are as many exciting new schools of jazz as in the 1960s at the moment and that is really saying something.

I didn't start the thread just to keep you updated. I think that 2007 through 2009 have been some amazing years for jazz music and there have been many more great releases than there have been for a long time.


TinyMontgomery

Uzi wrote:So Tiny, are you a fan of Mr. Zorn's stellar collaborations with Yamataka Eye? Do they still work together?
I'm very fond of most of Zorn's records. He's an incredible artist that has constantly tried out new kinds of music and been very successful at it too.

The collaborations with Eye were brilliant but I think they haven't worked together for ages.


TinyMontgomery

powerpete wrote:I'll be sure to check this out. I once saw
Joshua Redman in concert about 10 years ago, and apart from one of the
greatest concerts I've seen, I had two weird experiences there. The
first had to do with the opening act, Barbara Dennerlein, a German
organ player with her band. The friend who was with me at the concert
and I enjoyed her groovy, funky set, but both had the feeling that we
had been listening to nothing but noise the moment Joshua Redman and
his band began to play. The Dennerlein set just seemed to crumble to
ashes.
Redman keeps getting better and better. "Beyond" was a great record, "Momentum" was a bit more mature, "Back East" was his first major record and "Compass" is just as good. If you don't know much of his music be sure to check out "Beyond" first.


powerpete

Thanks for the suggestions.

Writing about that concert made me wonder why I hadn't kept on following his career after that - it was really so great. I've only got two early records - Spirit of the Moment and Freedom in the Groove. I like them both very much.


powerpete

Back to Redman. Got "Back East" last week and listened a lot to it. Love it!! Here's a live version of Zarafah, my favourite piece from that record:




TinyMontgomery

Yep, 'Back East' is great. Love the duet with his father, Dewey. 'Indonesia' is a very beautiful tune. Try 'Compass', you'll probably like it too. 'Beyond' is another great Redman record. And 'Momentum' is a nice fusion ditty.


Hosni

On the rare occasion that I see a jazz performance, afterwards.....as I am walking out, I will say very loudly........."man that cat could really blow, I haven't seen cats so deep in the pocket since that Pharoah Sanders freakout in Poughkeepsie." This is an effective way to let people know I am a jazz aficionado.


TinyMontgomery

Except after a cool jazz performance.
Or if the 'cat' was Scandinavian.

pinhedz
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Re: Newest Jazz Releases

Post  pinhedz on Mon Dec 19, 2011 10:40 am

No update since June 2009? Shocked

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Re: Newest Jazz Releases

Post  pinhedz on Mon Dec 19, 2011 10:42 am

Well, I suppose it's not quite as bad as all that: http://acrosstheuniverse.forummotion.com/t708-when-was-the-last-jazz-record-put-out

... but we're still almost 5 months behind the times. bounce

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Re: Newest Jazz Releases

Post  pinhedz on Tue Apr 24, 2012 2:14 am

OK--now we're up to date as of March 2012. cheers

Some of Esperanza's fans say this is too "poppish," but I ain't no judge (besides, I think she's hot).




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