The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Page 5 of 6 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Nov 29, 2016 12:28 pm


Kathy Kennedy has said they're thinking of scrapping numbered episodes after Episode IX, to make things more authentically conveyor belty, so there's that.



Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Wed Nov 30, 2016 6:24 pm


whoopity-dee, oo look - the secret secret plans of the "Death Star" are being projected onto her face, whoopity-dee



here is a movie about how they steal the secret plans of the "Death Star"


Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Wed Nov 30, 2016 6:27 pm

Yakima Canutt wrote:
whoopity-dee, oo look - the secret secret plans of the "Death Star" are being projected onto her face, whoopity-dee



here is a movie about how they steal the secret plans of the "Death Star"



a) I don't care all that much about how they steal the secret plans of the "Death Star"

b) I see the press packet and the girl is all "oh by the way, my dad totally invented the 'Death Star'" but in Episode II they make it clear that those termite guys invented the "Death Star" and you can even see the termites give the "Death Star" plans to Count Dooku

Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Thu Dec 08, 2016 6:36 pm


yer, considering how Jar Jar Abrams and Kathy Kennedy want to minimize the prequel films as much as possible, many in Kenosha are super antsy waiting to see if the termites are even properly respected as "Death Star" inventors in "Rogue Won" ... there is a rumor going around Sheboygan that the girl's dad, Mad Mikkkelsen, is the one who designed the thermal exhaust port on the "Death Star" - and he did it as a goof, as a big league goof ...


Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri Dec 09, 2016 11:47 am




Over the course of filming for Star Wars: Episode VIII, sources kept saying we were going to be super impressed with Snoke in this film. It was clear they were saying something was different about him. If you recall in Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Supreme Leader Snoke was a giant hologram towering over the likes of Kylo Ren and his “frienemy” General Hux. The controversy amongst fans wavered back and forth regarding his height. Was Snoke seven and a half feet tall? Was Snoke huge? Was Snoke like the fraud at the end of The Wizard of Oz and just the man behind the curtain?

For Star Wars: Episode VIII it appears, at least in part, that Snoke will not be a character generated in a computer. Instead he will be a huge puppet around seven to eight feet tall, taking several people to operate and a man inside a suit to make him walk. Stylistically, it seems as if Snoke may be CGI generated for the holographic communication sequences, but when he has scenes in Episode VIII next to real flesh-and-blood humans like Kylo Ren he will be a practical puppet with facial features operated by the crew.

In the past many have wondered if Snoke was someone we had seen on screen before. It seems somewhat unlikely considering his size. His arms alone give off the impression he is not exactly human as they are unnaturally long and unsettling. His appearance is identical to what we saw in the holograms but there’s apparently a “real” Snoke in the next installment of the Skywalker saga.

We don’t know exactly how much screen time Snoke has in Episode VIII and that makes it impossible to say he’s almost always a puppet in the film or CGI. But we do know the puppet is pretty pretty pretty impressive and appears to be articulated in such a way it seems it is more than an elaborate stand-in.

We suspect that the film may show us some of Kylo Ren, General Hux, and Phasma meeting with Snoke after the destruction of Starkiller Base. It has been confirmed that the film begins mere moments after Star Wars: The Force Awakens. With a lot of the film taking place on Ahch-To where Rey and Luke are, it seems as if we might get the juxtaposition of Luke and Rey between Snoke and Kylo. It would seem the puppet Snoke would be more powerful and interesting to look at than a CGI character, of which audiences are continually critiquing the visuals.

In Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Unkar Plutt ended up being a guy in a suit augmented by CGI work. Will the puppet Snoke be augmented in such a way as well? I thought a lot of Unkar was really rather impressive and perhaps we will see such a technique that marries the practical with the digital here.

I am really excited to see a puppet over seven feet in size that might kick Luke Skywalker’s butt. That’s pretty pretty pretty exciting and I can’t wait to learn more about the innovations and new ground transversed by Rian Johnson and the crew of Star Wars: Episode VIII. Just to reiterate, we cannot say what the balance between classic puppetry and CGI are but we do know they built a large impressive rig for Supreme Leader Snoke.

If you haven’t, head over to SteeleWars and get a “Your Snoke Theory Sucks” T-shirt.

Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri Dec 09, 2016 6:55 pm


look out you screw-heads, she is about to steal some secret-ass plans



see, she is already holding those fucking plans right now, you screw-heads

Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sat Dec 10, 2016 10:13 am



http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-38259838


Last edited by Yakima Canutt on Sun Dec 25, 2016 7:22 pm; edited 1 time in total

Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Dec 13, 2016 9:28 am




Here is what they are saying about Rogue One ... is Rogue Two already a fourgone conclusion?




   ROGUE ONE had me from the opening to the very end. Incredible action mixed with a script fans are going to love. Going to make people happy.

   — Steven Frosty Weintraubs (@colliderfrosty) December 11, 2016

   
   The 3rd act is really amazing. Some of the best action in any Star Wars movie. Need to see it again asap.
   — Steven Frosty Weintraubs (@colliderfrosty) December 11, 2016

   Also do not read any reviews. So many of the twists and turns have not been revealed in marketing. My jaw hit ground a few times. — Steven Frosty Weintraubs (@colliderfrosty) December 11, 2016

   With all the talk of reshoots and production problems the final cut of Rogue One is worth the wait. Man that 3rd act….so so good. — Steven Frosty Weintraubs (@colliderfrosty) December 11, 2016

   One of the best things about Rogue One are the new characters. They’re so well done and expand the universe. You care about all of them.

   — Steven Frosty Weintraubs (@colliderfrosty) December 11, 2016

     

   #RogueOne is pretty much everything I was hoping for & then some. So moving/satisfying for so many reasons. Already dying for a 2nd viewing.
   — Perri Nemiroff (@PNemiroff) December 11, 2016

     

   My emoji, ladies & gentlemen. https://t.co/MOrlnHWbwW

   — Mark Ellis (@markellislive) December 11, 2016

   People worried about #RogueOne not being a gritty war film need not worry. It’s intense, relentless. You can practically taste the grit. — Anthony Breznican (@Breznican) December 11, 2016

   I had high hopes. It exceeded them. — Anthony Breznican (@Breznican) December 11, 2016

   As with The Force Awakens, a fair number of shots from the #RogueOne trailers aren’t in the movie. But the trailers did capture the tone.

   — Anthony Breznican (@Breznican) December 11, 2016

   

   Chirrut Imwe and K-2SO steal the movie. Amazing work by Donnie Yen and Alan Tudyk.

   — Anthony Breznican (@Breznican) December 11, 2016

   I expected it to be funny. I didn’t expect to be choked up. Moments of true bravery, and some speeches we need right now. #RogueOne — Anthony Breznican (@Breznican) December 11, 2016

   Last thought (for now): Vader gets a moment of pure horror. Maybe more than one, arguably. #RogueOne — Anthony Breznican (@Breznican) December 11, 2016

   FELICITY JONES
   DONNIE YEN #RogueOne you were a thrill

   — jen yamato (@jenyamato) December 11, 2016

     

   Perfect Felicity Jones an action heroine I would follow into space battle any day, in a film full of great hero turns #rogueone

   — jen yamato (@jenyamato) December 11, 2016

   ROGUE ONE = excellent. People around me saying even better than THE FORCE AWAKENS. Congrats Disney/Lucasfilm/amazing talent involved. — Scott Feinberg (@ScottFeinberg) December 11, 2016

   Holy crap did I love Rogue One. It’s gonna take days to wipe the smile off my face. So many surprises and so much fun. Get excited. — Germain Lussier (@GermainLussier) December 11, 2016

   Star Wars fans will be very happy with #RogueOne. It’s fun, action packed, doesn’t feel neutered by reshoots. Donnie Yen and K2so standouts.

   — Peter Sciretta (@slashfilm) December 11, 2016

   … @m_giacchino score is a great mix of unique adaptation of Williams Star Wars score and the emotional strings we love from his work.
   — Peter Sciretta (@slashfilm) December 11, 2016

   Theres an amazing amount of footage/dialogue in the #RogueOne trailers and marketing that are not in the film, including Troopers in water.

   — Peter Sciretta (@slashfilm) December 11, 2016

   ROGUE ONE: The plotting and objectives are needlessly murky, but the look of this thing is *ravishing*. Drop the “why” and embrace the “wow”
   — Kyle Buchanan (@kylebuchanan) December 11, 2016

   ROGUE ONE mvps: Donnie Yen, Ben Mendelsohn, and Alan Tudyk’s shade-serving robot

   — Kyle Buchanan (@kylebuchanan) December 11, 2016

   ROGUE ONE’s real secret weapon is d.p. Greig Fraser, whose underlit, dreamy frames rep a brave stylistic break from today’s blockbuster look
   — Kyle Buchanan (@kylebuchanan) December 11, 2016

   HOLY FUCK! ROGUE ONE IS SPECTACULAR. IF YOU DON’T SEE THIS MOVIE MORE THAN ONCE YOU SUCK AT LIFE!!!! @starwars !!!! WOW. WOW!!!

   — Kyle Newman (@kyle_newman) December 11, 2016

   Oh my holy God I loved #RogueOne too much!!
   — Jim Vejvoda (@JimVejvoda) December 11, 2016

   So… #RogueOne? It’s freaking great! So many crowd-pleasing moments! It’s emotional, exciting and incredibly satisfying. Loved it!

   — Eric Goldman (@TheEricGoldman) December 11, 2016

Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Wed Dec 14, 2016 10:21 am


yerbuts most of those are fanboy bloggtwits, what are the cogno-scenty saying?

Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Wed Dec 14, 2016 10:23 am


Lobotomized and depersonalized, “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,” the latest entry in the film franchise, is a pure and perfect product that makes last year’s flavor, “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” feel like an exemplar of hands-on humanistic warmth and dramatic intimacy. Sure, J. J. Abrams’s movie offered merely effectively packaged simulacra of such values—but at least he tried. The director of “Rogue One,” Gareth Edwards, has stepped into a mythopoetic stew so half-baked and overcooked, a morass of pre-instantly overanalyzed implications of such shuddering impact to the series’ fundamentalists, that he lumbers through, seemingly stunned or constrained or cautious to the vanishing point of passivity, and lets neither the characters nor the formidable cast of actors nor even the special effects, of which he has previously proved himself to be a master, come anywhere close to life.

Edwards’s “Godzilla” was both spectacular and preachy, a Sunday-school lesson cloaked in the kind of movie that the pupils get to watch when Sunday school lets out—but its moralizing seemed, at the very least, like Edwards’s own moralizing; it had a voice, albeit one far less authentic and original than the visual one that he conjured with the film’s colossal action scenes. I hesitate even to ascribe the deadness of “Rogue One” to Edwards’s failure, except perhaps a failure of executive authority rather than of artistry. Authorship of “Rogue One” may fall to its screenwriters, Chris Weitz and Tony Gilroy (the latter was reportedly involved in extensive reshoots), or to the writers of the story on which the script was based, John Knoll and Gary Whitta—but I’d likelier ascribe authorship not even to the movie’s battalion of producers but to the “Star Wars” brand itself, since “Rogue One” has (with a few momentary exceptions) all the heart and soul of a logo and a theme.

There is a story to “Rogue One,” one that I overheard a viewer or two describe as “dark” on the way out, and I suppose that, despite the inevitable happy ending (or, at least, successful mission), some serious unpleasantness occurs along the way—mainly the death of some major characters. But it’s a sign of the narrow constraints or limits of Edwards’s artistry, or of the script that he was handed, that the scenes in which such unpleasantness occurs have all the emotional impact of a checklist or a call sheet that simply says whether an actor will or won’t be needed the next day. Whether the downplaying of the formidable cast’s charismatic energies is an intentional downplaying of the potential risk to the characters that they play—whether it’s a matter of not actually allowing viewers to get too attached to characters or actors, not allowing viewers to be bummed out by bad news but rather breezing past it in a spirit of fealty not to these characters or performers but to the franchise—is the kind of corporate Kremlinology that would rightly take the place of criticism in assessing the substance and tone of the movie.

Actually, “Rogue One” is unusually dark, but only in the literal sense—its cinematography enshrouds the characters in a surprisingly murky depth of shadows. The cinematographer, Greig Fraser, has quite the résumé—several of his films are notable mainly for their cinematography, such as “Foxcatcher,” “Killing Them Softly,” and, above all, “Let Me In,” in which the camera work is more or less the movie’s main character and certainly its main appeal. When, late in the film, the galactic combat bursts into the brilliant baby blue of a seemingly bottomless atmospheric dome, the impact of light and color is momentarily stunning—the sole moment of sheer sense-pleasure that the movie offers.

To the producers’ credit, “Rogue One” offers an international cast that, along with Jones, Whitaker, and Mikkelsen, features Diego Luna (as the rebel captain Cassian Andor, who is Jyn’s main cohort), Riz Ahmed (as the band’s intrepid pilot), and Donnie Yen (as a blind martial-arts spiritualist). But it seems as if the condition for assembling this diverse group is not letting them say or do anything of note, anything of any individual distinction, anything of any free-floating or idiosyncratic implication. There’s none of the Shakespearean space politics, enticingly florid dialogue, or experiential thrills of the best of George Lucas’s “Star Wars” entries (“Attack of the Clones” and “Revenge of the Sith”). The script of “Rogue One” is so flat and inexpressive, the direction of the actors so methodical, as to render these artists nearly robotic and synthetic. The one character with any inner identity is, in fact, a robot, K-2SO, voiced by Alan Tudyk, and the only performance with any flair at all is a C.G.I. incarnation, or, rather, resurrection.

Even the climactic battle scenes, in which the band of rebel warriors risks all to disable and destroy the Death Star according to Galen’s instructions, pivot on an unintentionally comical plot point—centered on the transmission of an exceptionally large packet of data—that seems ready-made to be reprocessed as a series of commercials for an Internet-service provider or a cell-phone plan. It makes perfect sense: “Rogue One” isn’t so much a movie as a feature-length promotional film for itself; it’s a movie that is still waiting to be made.


Last edited by Yakima Canutt on Sun Dec 25, 2016 7:19 pm; edited 1 time in total

Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Thu Dec 15, 2016 10:22 am



Mike Avila: The first word that came to my mind after leaving a screening of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story was consequence. There has never been a Star Wars movie where consequences and sacrifice permeated the film like this.

Tara Bennett: I also felt the weight of a Star Wars film that is more of a war film than any other, without the lightness of previous chapters. However, I was happy to watch a new film that wasn't afraid to embrace such a dark story while retaining a moral center that genuinely reflects the spirit of the entire franchise.

Mike Avila: Rogue One is, in many ways, the Star Wars movie diehards have been waiting to see ever since we outgrew our action figures and acne and stayed tethered to the franchise that meant so much to so many of us. By that I mean this movie is the "grown up" Star Wars movie we’ve always wanted. Yes, The Force Awakens took steps to move the franchise in a more advanced direction, but for longtime fans, a great deal of our disappointment with the prequels — aside from the obvious quality issues — was that they were made for kids. It wasn’t for us. We wanted our franchise to grow up as we had.

With Rogue One, we get a movie that offers more complexity and shades of grey than any other film in the saga. Director Gareth Edwards and credited screenwriters Chris Weitz and Tony Gilroy flesh out the story of the rebels who stole the plans for the original Death Star and take us right onto the middle of the dirty center of the war tearing apart the galaxy.

Tara Bennett: They also give us a film centered on a strong heroine that isn't as warm or enthusiastic as Rey in The Force Awakens. Jyn Erso is a survivor and as such, she's done and been incarcerated for a lot of shady, rootless behavior. Felicity Jones inherently possesses a sweet face, but as Erso the actress is able to shift into more of a stubborn, less readable mode where she gives away nothing until she's ready. That helps the cat and mouse aspects of the film as she comes to terms with her mysterious family history, and her own place in the Rebellion. She's a darker heroine, well suited for the gritty tone of the film, but one you come to trust and root for like she does with her adopted squadron.

Mike Avila: Exactly. The Rebel Alliance here isn’t the scrappy, unified force for good we saw in the OT. it’s a fractured bunch, coming apart at the seams due to infighting and philosophical differences. They’re also not so altruistic. The ‘greater good’ is a big theme here, and we see several instances where cold-blooded decisions are made that make you stop and think.

Tara Bennett: I loved that this script explored a far less black and white world-view, with leadership on both sides of the war making really small-minded, ego-filled decisions that lean towards not appreciating the value of context and information before making life-stakes level choices. It's sobering and more real than we've seen from the film franchise.

Mike Avila: And then there’s Saw Gerrera (Forest Whitaker) and his band of extremists. They are a radical departure for the franchise as their methods are too extreme for the Rebellion. When you learn they hide out in the rugged mountain area of Jedha, and carry out attacks on Imperial troops in crowded marketplaces, it’s impossible not to draw comparisons to real-life radical groups.

Tara Bennett: We obviously like a lot about the world and it's tone, so what didn't gel? For me it, was the breakneck speed at which the events are introduced to the audience which doesn't allow for much breathing room for character after the opening Prologue. In introducing an older Jyn, the film is literally jumping from location to location to set up the plot, but there's not much in terms of getting a lot of context or character building scenes for the duration of the film. As a war film, I understand that actual situation doesn't allow for campfire scenes, or hanging in the ship hold talking sequences when the time factor, and stakes are so dire. There isn't time to bond closely, but that doesn't mean I wouldn't have liked to know all of the characters in Erso's squad more, or her. We're left wanting in my book, which is a good place to be, but not that great for creating an emotional connection for the audience as we watch these characters embark on an endeavor where we need to be emotionally engaged in their suicide mission to really land the heart of the film. Edwards does make it land, but it could have landed even more in the last, emotional act.



Mike Avila: The notable disappointment to me was Forest Whitaker as Saw Gerrera. The character, who first appeared in The Clone Wars animated series, actually works better as an off-camera myth. We learn more about him when he’s off-screen than when he appears. I’d be willing to bet a lot of Saw’s story was lost either in the much-publicized reshoots, or in the edit room. Either way, the one big missed opportunity was exploring the fracture in Saw’s relationship with Jyn and the Rebellion.

Tara Bennett: Agreed on that count. I love Forest usually, but he was too big in this film for my taste and was a little too Blue Velvet for what was happening. But I really did love the assembled support that goes with Jyn to acquire the Death Star plans. Diego Luna as Cassian Andor is a more serious, Han Solo type, who is dashing but principled. He's the least trusting of Jyn and their arc of mutual common ground is one of the best character arcs in the film.

Mike Avila: There isn’t a lightsaber in sight, which shouldn’t really be a surprise since the filmmakers said as much during the pre-release publicity campaigns. Still, it was strange not seeing the more elegant weapon from a more civilized time in a Star Wars movie. But thanks to Chirrut Imre (the absurdly great Donnie Yen), we still get to see a Jedi-like master at work. I say ‘Jedi-like’ because Chirrut isn’t really a Jedi (at least that’s what we’re led to believe). But he’s a dedicated believer in the Force on a planet where True Believers of the Jedi once flocked. Him and Baze Malbus (Wen Jiang) provide an instant spark once they show up. They are great additions to the canon, as are Jyn and Cassian. Oh, and K-2SO (voiced by Alan Tudyk) is an absolute scene-stealer. Not just in comic-relief fashion either. It was fascinating to see his determination to fit in and be part of this group. K-2 was as human as any other character in the movie, and he’ll be a big fan favorite once the movie opens.

Tara Bennett: Chirrut and Baze are my walk-away favorites. Their rapport, yin and yang as it is, and their emotional connection as friends earned my first tears in the film. They are exceptional additions to the mythology and create an emotional climax that really brings home the stakes of the film in the last act. And speaking of which, it's the last act of Rogue One that really knocks this film into high gear. Once the squad lands for their do-or-die goal, Edwards is able to weave together emotional moments, with incredibly engaging battle scenes, new POVs to experience the Empire and Rebellion in full war mode, as well as a tense McGuffin filled path to success that gives the array of characters a chance to shine. All of it leads to the last ten minutes which are just awesome and bridge to A New Hope in a masterful way.

Mike Avila: We already know that Darth Vader is back in this movie, and while his appearance is brief, it is real and spectacular. This is the Vader during the time he was Palpatine’s Bogeyman, the baddest dude in the galaxy. The mere mention of his name makes Imperial officers shudder. it’s great to see Anakin Skywalker in full heel mode again. And yes, the climactic battle on the beach on Scarif is something to behold. For goodness sakes, we have stormtroopers and AT-AT Walkers on a beach. How does life get any better than that?

Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Thu Dec 15, 2016 10:40 am




http://imgur.com/gallery/s3e4i

Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri Dec 16, 2016 8:53 am




Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sat Dec 17, 2016 11:55 am


When movie brat George Lucas began the Star Wars series, it was possible to imagine that he was working out his own adolescent fascination with serial narrative and space-age adventure, which eventually led to the complexities and abstracted, visionary effects of the often ridiculed Revenge of the Sith. Critic Gregory Solman shrewdly assessed the momentary backlash (remember all that fake outrage over Jar Jar Binks?) as an indication of the consumer appetite of the Star Wars generation. “Fickle,” Solman put it. But the temporarily bored children soon came back to the discarded toy set and, in the new millennium, the media-political complex joined in by celebrating The Force Awakens as though it were something new, nearly patriotic.

It would take a social psychologist on the order of Bruno Bettelheim (author of the fairy-tale study The Uses of Enchantment) to parse Rogue One’s repetitive story and characters as recurring dream figures. Certainly, abandoned child Jyn and rascal Cassian represent Hansel and Gretel adventurers seeking to repair their damaged family and community relations while contending with fearful social forces (Darth Vader, Saw Gerrera, Grand Moff Tarkin). This traumatic condition fits the obsessive pattern of behavior that defines contemporary cultural habits.

Pop art rarely expresses common spiritual and psychological needs so much as it repeatedly connects consumers to the process of cultural indoctrination ensuring their safe place in the group-think society. It’s the Pixar, Apple condition: Conforming becomes its own reward. Even if it’s called “rebellion,” it means you belong.

So, while Jyn Erso fulfills the new feminist mandate, Jones’s bucktooth charm is juvenile without quite fitting the gung-ho manner required. Luna’s Cassian Endor suffers the fate of Hollywood’s usual multicultural gestures; he stands in for diversity yet hasn’t been given a personality beyond representing the now-diminished masculine principle. (As for the new robot sidekick K-2SO, I can’t believe we’re watching mechanical comic relief.) If Luke, Leia, and Han Solo were already tired pop archetypes, these types feel degraded. They are, to quote a prominent pop propagandist, the JV team. Rogue One works on this basic, familiar level by distracting from it. Like Star Wars back in 1977, Rogue One flatters the moral and political distance felt by today’s audiences. But this form of escapism is tricky. It depends on the reassuring recognition of well-known characters (the intergalactic menagerie of alien creatures, stormtroopers, and robots) and customary details (sci-fi surplus space ships) with slight variations (machinery painted in worn khaki colors, and iterations of that good old lightsaber).

The JV aspect of Rogue One reflects Gareth Edwards’s uninspired direction. The first 90 minutes of Jyn and Cassian and the ragtag Rebellion traversing distant planets occurs in drab, shadowy places with monotonous dialogue repeating Star Wars cant. When the Rebellion finally arrives at Scarif, a tropical planet housing the Death Star, the bright sky, blue atmosphere, and unexpected palm trees are a real relief from aesthetic tedium. Suddenly, the toys appear: from the walking dinosaur tanks to space crafts in origami shapes. It’s like the March of Wooden Soldiers from Babes in Toyland, set at cliché warp speed.

In a tired attempt at making this Death Star battle a quasi-political allegory, Disney’s screenplay hacks (including Chris Weitz and Tony Gilroy) cajole the Occupy generation with the phrase “Rebellion is built on hope” — uttered twice, as if Star Wars had not been appropriated by Reagan’s defense department but was now in sync with contemporary student protest. But it’s a deceptive, Machiavellian mantra. Rogue One isn’t sophisticated enough to see past the phrase’s falsehood or adult enough to dramatize the current administration’s betrayal of “hope and change” and how its media sycophants eventually lost public trust in hope or change. Rogue One’s juvenile politics recall how, in Revenge of the Sith (2005), Princess Amidala (Natalie Portman) whimpered, “So this is how liberty dies . . . with thunderous applause.” Liberal reviewers hailed the line as a rebuke of George W. Bush’s reelection.

But there’s no need to ascribe fake significance to the Star Wars franchise when there are other great space movies, from Altman’s Countdown and Kubrick’s 2001 to Spielberg’s Close Encounters and Walter Hill’s Supernova. These films make Rogue One look like the JV team indeed. Indeed indeed indeed indeed indeed indeed indeed indeed.


Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Thu Dec 22, 2016 9:34 am


LISTEN, YOU SCREW-HEADS, MON MOTHMA IS FROM CHANDRILA IN THE CORUSCANT CORE




Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Thu Dec 22, 2016 10:34 am



spoil?

muthergoatfucker, there are crazy VIII rumours swirling amok about Rey fighting a sea monster while she's on the island of Ahch-To ... maybe as part of a training regimen, holy ducksnot


Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sat Dec 24, 2016 7:31 am


i've gott good news - both the US and UK editions of The Guardian Paper have given 4 out of 5 stars to Rogue One 1: The Star Wars Story.  Like a Star @ heaven  Like a Star @ heaven  Like a Star @ heaven  Like a Star @ heaven



Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sat Dec 24, 2016 12:42 pm




Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  pinhedz on Sun Dec 25, 2016 1:56 am

Yeahbut, what about General Leia? Neutral

pinhedz
Schrödinger's Hepcat

Posts : 11797
Join date : 2011-04-11
Location : DC

http://www.balalaika.org/

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sun Dec 25, 2016 5:08 am


She's in the ICU and everybody's praying for her.

The General recently wrapped filming for Episode VIII. Peter Mayhew, who performed as Wookie Chewbacca of Kashyyyk, called her "everyone's favourite princess."

https://twitter.com/WilliamShatner/status/812410817853304832


Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sun Dec 25, 2016 5:15 pm




http://variety.com/2016/film/news/rogue-one-peter-cushing-digital-resurrection-cgi-1201943759/

Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sun Dec 25, 2016 6:19 pm


I agree with Geo Lucas.  Episode 3.9 - Rogue One is better than The Force Awookens.


http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/la-ca-mn-rogue-one-gareth-edwards-20161201-story.html



Except for the Digital Peter Cushing and the Digital Carrie Fisher. That was fuckin awful.


Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Jan 03, 2017 7:10 am




Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Thu Jan 05, 2017 4:38 pm




Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri Jan 06, 2017 11:41 am


i'm not bothered by "the ethics" of it (the ethics would be no different to Guy Henry performing the role in a rubber Cushing mask) - i'm bothered by how phugazi phony it looks ... seamless my balogna foot



Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8648
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: The Undiscovered Cosmic Nemesis, Episode XI : Beyond an Awakening Menace

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 5 of 6 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum