Things someone else just wanted to say......

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  pinhedz on Fri Sep 30, 2016 6:04 am

The magazine founded that William F. Buckley founded has declared that, like the pinhed said, President Trump will be powerless to implement any of his domestic policies.

However, this same magazine claims that in terms of foreign policy, President Trump will be like Godzilla. :afraid:

It's true--he will have that nuclear button thing.

http://www.nationalreview.com/article/440458/donald-trump-debate-foreign-policy-nato-allies-treaties-vladimir-putin

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Yakima Canutt on Wed Oct 05, 2016 9:08 am











"If you are that famous and you put all your jewelry on the net, you go to hotels where nobody can come near to the room. You cannot display your wealth and then be surprised that some people want to share it with you."

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Yakima Canutt on Wed Oct 05, 2016 11:07 am



http://www.newsweek.com/clifford-stoll-why-web-wont-be-nirvana-185306

http://famousclowns.org/famous-clowns/emmett-kelly-sr-biography-world-famous-tramp-clown/

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sat Oct 15, 2016 11:46 am

“Well, I think we live in a society, number one, that there are no secrets. So, if Colin took all the reps with the ones on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, somebody’s ‘mole’ would have told them who was taking all the reps, you know what I mean? And I don’t really care. We have two similar quarterbacks. Our offense doesn’t change. I don’t think you’re going to outsmart people in the National Football League where all of a sudden if the second quarterback’s playing that [Buffalo Bills head coach] Rex [Ryan] is going to tear up his game plan and say, ‘We’re screwed. We have no idea how to defend him.’ People way over-analyze the whole thing. You ask me a question. I’m going to tell you an answer. You ask me who our quarterback is. I’m going to tell you who our quarterback is. Our quarterback maneuver was made on Tuesday, then our quarterback will be announced on Tuesday. So, I don’t buy that whole stick the banana in the tailpipe and try to tell them the car is broken. It is what it is. We made the maneuver on Tuesday. I’ll announce it on Tuesday.”

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Yakima Canutt on Wed Oct 19, 2016 5:36 pm


SANTA CLARA — You’ve got to go, son. Get out of the way. Just clear out.

I’m talking to you, Jed York. Talking as an older man to a younger man. Talking as someone who has nothing to gain. Telling it straight. You need to hear straight talk. Something you don’t hear from your underlings or whoever advises you.

I’m familiar with the smell of failure. From my own life. From life in general. The smell is all around and it’s on you. Has been for years. You reek of failure. You and the Niners need a deodorant.

Not saying you’re a bad man. Don’t know about you one way or another. But you are a bad leader. A terrible CEO. That’s what you are, CEO of the San Francisco 49ers, once a great sports organization. A national treasure. Now look what the Niners are.

Pitiful. Laughable. Contemptible.

It all happened under your stewardship, son, and it’s your fault. Get out of the way. For the Niners good. For your own good. For the good of football.

Let’s take a quick look at your legacy, such as it is. In your time as team big shot, you have hired four head coaches. Three were disasters. Mike Singletary may have been the worst head coach in NFL history. Or maybe Jim Tomsula was the worst. Certainly, the incumbent, Chip Kelly, is vying for worst ever.

In each case, you didn’t have to compete for the hire. That’s because no other team wanted Singletary, Tomsula or Kelly. So sad. So awful to watch you in action.

If you hadn’t hired Kelly, he’d be out of the league. He’s so bad, he was unable to attract quality coordinators — no one respects him. Offensive coordinator Curtis Modkins? Defensive coordinator Jim O’Neil? Shame on you and Kelly and the 49ers.

You gave Kelly a second chance, and he’s on a five-game losing streak. Is overmatched by the league. It’s so obvious. He is a college coach. He gets blasted in the second half of games like he did against Buffalo. When you ask why — I did on Monday — he says stuff like, “We’ve got to do a better job.”

You think?

That kind of talk is loser coach talk. I’ve heard it a million times, bad coaches verbally wiggling out of the tough places. Bad coaches trying to wiggle. Bad coaches without a clue.

Kelly talks technical football to extricate himself from answering hard, fair questions. He knows the media won’t understand a word he’s saying, puts up a verbal shield. On Monday, he went on and on about something the Bills defense did called the “inside twist.” Is it a dance? Whatever the twist is, the Niners didn’t handle it in that 45-16 embarrassment. Come on, baby, let’s do the twist.

You hired this guy, son. It’s not his fault. It’s yours.

You also hired general manager Trent Baalke. He was the topper-offer in the whole sorry deal. Another one you didn’t compete for. No one else was breaking down the door for him. He has accumulated the worst roster in the league even though he and you have plenty of money to spend. Why didn’t you spend it?

Not Baalke’s fault he’s no good. It’s yours for putting him in the position to be no good and ruin the franchise.

It’s on you, son.

I’ll point out that you hired Singletary, Tomsula and Baalke from within the organization. Took the path of least resistance. So weak and naïve on your part. Not how a leader acts.

In your entire time in charge, you made one good hire. Jim Harbaugh. You lucked into Harbaugh because he wanted to stay in the Bay Area and was in awe of the 49ers tradition — before you and your family degraded it. And because Bill Walsh mentored him. Coaching the 49ers was his homage to Walsh.

And then you loused things up with Harbaugh. Sure, he was difficult. But you loused things up and ran him out of town. Look where that got you.

I will go one further. Point out the worst part of your legacy. Moved the 49ers out of San Francisco. The Giants stayed in San Francisco. The Warriors are relocating to San Francisco. But you went to Santa Clara. Seriously. It’s like taking the Packers out of Green Bay or the Yankees out of New York.

It is shameful, son, and it is on you.

You need to go.

Soon, you will fire Baalke. It’s obvious he’s gone. You can’t go anywhere near the hiring of a new GM, son. Leave it to someone with expertise. Clear out of the way. We’ve seen your hires and we cringe. Things are consistently getting worse and there’s no hope. Because of you.

Here’s what should happen. Your parents should promote you, one of those promotions with quotation marks around it. You parents should acknowledge all your hard work. Let you handle stadium concerts, Wrestlemania at Levi’s, minor-league soccer — stuff like that. Everything that doesn’t involve football.

Mom and Dad should allow you and you alone to expand the famous York brand globally. The world awaits the brand. You can do that, son. I know you can.

But Denise and John need to sanitize the 49ers headquarters of your influence and your odor of failure. Let someone else pick the GM and coach and scouts and players. And, you, take your fancy suits and your shiny loafers and your nice socks and shirts and ties, and go someplace else. Anywhere else. I’m giving you every bit of wisdom I have.

Go away, son.

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  pinhedz on Tue Nov 01, 2016 2:51 pm

Good news--Harry Reed has informed Comey that it is perfectly OK to campaign this way.

And if Reed says it's OK you can be sure it's 100% pure and righteous. Smile  

"In my communications with you and other top officials in the national security community, it has become clear that you possess explosive information about the close ties and coordination between Donald Trump, his top advisors and the Russian government – a foreign interest openly hostile to the United States, which Trump praises at every opportunity. The public has a right to know this information."

"I wrote to you months ago calling for this information to be released to the public...and yet, you continue to resist calls to inform the public of this critical information."



There you have it--never mind the election, get the raw unprocessed stories out to the public. The public has a right. bounce

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Nov 01, 2016 6:12 pm









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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sat Nov 05, 2016 11:11 am



Originally my interest in Virginia Dare came as a child upon hearing the jingle of the Virginia Dare wine on the radio, and seeing the label art that featured a pretty blond girl who seemed out of a fairy tale. Later, I wondered what had happened to this early American winery, which was one of the first in the U.S.A., and this led to research and the fascinating story of the birth of the first Anglo child in the New World, the disappearance of the Lost Colony, and the power of the consolidated Algonquin tribes under the great chief Powhatan and his brother Opechancanough, in Werowocomoco, Va.

More reading and study led to my desire to resurrect this early American wine brand at the site of the former Geyser Peak winery in Geyserville. As the purchase of the property brought with it a permit allowing the development of a visitor center and restaurant, I began to imagine that we could feature Native American ambience and food that would highlight ingredients of America as it once had been.

A chance opportunity enabled me to buy a set of rare books (“History of the Indian Tribes of North America,” assembled by Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall between 1836 and 1844), which consisted of beautiful color prints of American chiefs as they appeared at the time. These books and reproductions of some of the prints are on display at the winery.

I was filled with awe and respect for these people and fascinated with their story and wanted to learn what I could. I also wanted the opportunity to taste and experience what Native American food is like today, and so over several years I traveled in search of it. I shared meals on Indian reservations in Arizona and New Mexico, in private homes and eateries for local people.

I had a wonderful opportunity to have a dinner prepared by Loretta Oden, an acclaimed Native American chef, and subsequently began to arrive at the concept of a menu inspired by my experiences as well as my own ideas of appealing dishes for our visitors, including items such as fry bread with bison meat and bison ribs, which were presented throughout my many meals, most notably at Ben Jacobs’ and Matt Chandra’s wonderful Tocabe in Denver. Later I thought of other dishes including wild rice salads, bison burgers on acorn flour buns, prairie fowl and plank salmon, as well as salmon sashimi and various desserts, such as “pine cones.” I found myself consulting with many of the people I had met on my travels, as well as a friend, Cindy Pawlcyn, who maintains a huge library of cookbooks and is expert on anything having to do with food.

Eventually I formed a council of advisers consisting mainly of Native Americans of different tribes from around the country, to bring authenticity and respect for these traditions as well as support for what I feel are important issues of health, youth and education, employment, preservation of language and culture, food and ingredient acquisition, and art. I confess that I used my own imagination and creative powers to bring this project to life much in the way that I would have in making a film.

The story I was telling was part myth (The White Doe and the Two Arrowheads, and the magical tale of why white wine turned red) in parallel with real history — the creation of the Virginia colonies by Sir Walter Raleigh, the encounter with the powerful Algonquin leader Powhatan and the enduring mystery of the Lost Colony. I originally wanted to call the restaurant after Powhatan (father of Pocahontas), but was told this name couldn’t be registered. I then thought of using the name Werowocomoco and contacted the Pamunkey tribe in Virginia asking for permission to do this, and their tribal council graciously consented.

After much effort, we step by step made a number of Native American liaisons in our area, and it is my hope that we will find success in collaboration with other indigenous people of this beautiful part of the world.

Werowocomoco, American Native food restaurant will, guided by our council of advisors, choose charitable organizations, offer preferential employment opportunities and give foodstuffs acquisition preference to local tribes, and in the spirit of companies such as Orvis:

The Virginia Dare Winery, a family-owned company, will donate 5 percent of its pretax profits to America’s Native People.


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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  fiberNz on Mon Nov 07, 2016 9:18 am

Or should i ask, what's new Uzi?

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Yakima Canutt on Mon Nov 07, 2016 4:28 pm








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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  fiberNz on Tue Nov 08, 2016 8:26 am

You know once upon a time i thought i could be like you. To truly harness the power of immaculate forum posting and become a master. To reach a degree of transcendence so great that each post or joke would land perfectly. Everytime someone would see my name or avatar, they'd know a raging storm of humour and pertinency was approaching. How young and foolish of me to ever mistake my place on this earth. There can only be one. I think you've existed forever and will continue on long after we're gone.

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Nov 08, 2016 9:13 am



http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Vergence

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  pinhedz on Tue Nov 08, 2016 10:40 am

The banner says "YOU MAY LIKE ...."

Yeah, I suppose, what's not to like?


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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Nov 08, 2016 11:01 am


that her Halloween costume was Deadpool ... not terribly creative

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Nov 08, 2016 11:54 am





Last edited by Yakima Canutt on Wed Nov 09, 2016 1:39 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  fiberNz on Wed Nov 09, 2016 7:35 am

Wow...midi-chlorians. It all makes sense now, that's all i needed to hear. Nothing will stand in my way...I will finish what you started.

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Yakima Canutt on Wed Nov 09, 2016 10:37 am



the first step is having a good serial killer avatar


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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri Nov 11, 2016 6:45 pm





"If just 53,667 people who voted for Trump — or 0.045 percent of the 120 million people who cast a ballot nationwide — had voted instead for Hillary Clinton, she and her team would be the ones transitioning to the White House right now.

However, it’s not just any 53,667 people in the country. The voters would have had to switch in Michigan, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania.

If 5,919 Trump voters did that in Michigan, 13,629 in Wisconsin, and 34,118 in Pennsylvania, Clinton would have won each of those states by the slimmest of margins (a vote or two)."


Cool pig

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Yakima Canutt on Thu Nov 17, 2016 12:12 pm



Don't listen to the laffs of Rinse Probus - the Electoral College ignores the many votes of rural Real Californians like Buck Owens and Merle Haggards

Dr. Noah
Politicop Mag

The Electoral College would likely have been jettisoned long ago were it not for the fact that, prior to the 21st century, the winner lost the popular vote only three times, all of them way back in the 19th century. During the past 16 years, though, it’s happened twice, with only Obama sandwiched in between. That makes this constitutional kink harder to ignore, especially when you remember that the country averted only narrowly a split between the popular vote and the Electoral College majority in 1960, 1968, 1976, 1992, 2004 and 2012.

The sample is less than scientific, but one can’t help noticing that popular-vote losers make subpar presidents. The 19th-century crop (John Quincy Adams, Rutherford B. Hayes and Benjamin Harrison) did not, historians tend to agree, rank high in achievement. In this century, George W. Bush—denied a popular-vote victory until his second term—launched an ill-considered war in Iraq (his own brother had a famously difficult time defending it) and did some other stuff, too. We don’t yet know what kind of president Trump will be, but even many within his own party judge him unfit for office.

How did we end up with such a screwy system? Blame slavery. It’s considered bad manners in Washington ever to suggest that anything might be wrong with the U.S. Constitution, but any document premised on the legality of slavery is going to have a few glitches in it. The 13th Amendment abolished slavery in 1865, but slavery’s previous existence continued to warp Article II, which established the election of presidents indirectly through the allocation of state electors. There were several reasons for this, but the most urgent was that choosing a president by popular vote threatened to disadvantage the South because so much of its population consisted of slaves (who, being “property,” were not permitted to vote).

The founders fixed that by creating middlemen—electors—whose number matched the number of representatives a given state sent to Congress. House members were allocated to each state based on population, counting slaves (appallingly) as three-fifths of a person. To even up Electoral College representation just a bit among states, two bonus electors were awarded per state, to match the number of senators in each. By this tortured workaround did one peculiar institution beget another.

Remember, too, that the founders were less committed to direct democracy than we are today, for reasons both practical (information travelled slowly) and philosophical. Initially most states restricted the franchise to white male landowners, and even they couldn’t choose U.S. senators directly until 1913; state legislatures chose them instead. African-Americans weren’t guaranteed the franchise until ratification of the 15th Amendment in 1870, and nearly a century would pass before Congress passed a law to enforce that right. Women couldn’t vote until 1920. Young adults aged 18, 19 and 20 couldn’t vote until 1971.

Democracy took two centuries to bloom. But even after 227 years, U.S. citizens remain ineligible to elect the president directly. Only states can do that, acting through electors.

Inertia is the main reason the Electoral College was never amended out of existence, combined with perceived partisan advantage. Republicans were presumed to have a “lock” on the Electoral College from 1980 until 1992, when Democrat Bill Clinton was elected to the first of two terms. Democrats were thought to have an Electoral-College lock (or “blue wall”) from 2008 until … last Tuesday. In truth, neither party can count on maintaining an electoral lock for very long.

To judge from his Tuesday-morning tweet, Trump now appears to believe the oft-repeated chestnut that the Electoral College minimizes the impact of two demographic changes that favor Democrats: urbanization and immigration. But that ignores an important advantage that the Electoral College confers on more populous, urban and immigrant-rich states like California and New York: winner-take-all allocation of electors.

Forty-eight of the 50 states choose to allocate all their electors to their popular-vote winner. That maximizes a state’s collective influence over who becomes president—but it effectively disenfranchises any voters who favored the losers. Only Maine and Nebraska do the reverse. Those states allocate their electors among the candidates proportionally according to the vote. (Well, mostly proportionally. The winner automatically receives two electors. The others are allocated according to who won in each congressional district.) In rejecting winner-take-all, Maine and Nebraska diminish their collective influence over who becomes president—it’s fairly puny anyway, given that they have only four and five electors, respectively—and increase the clout of individual voters.

Winner-take-all makes populous blue states like California and New York more influential, not less, over who becomes president. California gave all 55 of its electors and New York all its 29 to Hillary Clinton, even though Trump won about a third of the vote in each state. If we elected presidents by popular vote, the votes of those Trump voters would mean something. Not in this particular election—Trump, remember, lost the popular vote—but in another those votes might conceivably have put him over the top. (There was, in fact, some speculation before Election Day that Trump might win the popular vote and lose the Electoral College to Clinton. He wouldn’t have taken that well.)

In truth, the Electoral College confers some advantage on rural states (because every state gets two electors in addition to those awarded based on population) but an even bigger one on the big, populous ones (because of winner-take-all). It’s the middle-sized states that get screwed.

For all that, candidates spend little time campaigning in most big and little states. They skip rural states because those two extra electors don’t equalize the numbers enough to make farm country worth visiting. They skip big bustling states because they’re usually so predictably Democratic (or, in the case of Texas, Republican) that campaigning in them is either superfluous or futile. Instead, candidates spend much of their time in a small number of swing states like Ohio and Pennsylvania. If we elected presidents by popular vote, candidates would have to campaign wherever votes could be found. That covers a lot more territory.

Some people justify the Electoral College by arguing that it manufactures or exaggerates majorities, creating an illusion of greater consensus than really exists. Bill Clinton was twice elected president with mere pluralities. George W. Bush in 2004 and Barack Obama in 2012 were elected with wimpy majorities of only about 51 percent. Look at those numbers for any length of time and you’re liable to conclude the U.S. has a very narrowly-divided electorate.

But the Electoral College, thanks to the 48 winner-take-all states, produces more robust-looking majorities that translate into a mandate for a new president’s policies. Never mind that the mandate is an illusion. The Electoral College is like the blue pill in The Matrix that keeps you from finding out you’re a human battery. Why not take the red pill and face up to the fact that we are a narrowly-divided electorate? That would seem an especially useful truth for President-elect Trump to ponder.

Granted, choosing presidents by popular vote could, in a crowded general-election field, yield winners supported by less than 30 percent of the electorate. But that could always be fixed with runoff elections.

A weak but oft-repeated argument for keeping the Electoral College is “50 Floridas.” Thus Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, in 2004, argued that had the president been chosen by popular vote four years earlier, its narrowness (about 500,000) would have inspired recounts in all 50 states instead of just one, Florida. But when you’re assembling one big count the likelihood of an excruciatingly narrow popular-vote difference diminishes, because the numbers are bigger. The possibility that recounting any state’s popular vote would make much difference would be much smaller.

One solution would be to eliminate the Electoral College with a constitutional amendment. Proposing amendments to the constitution tends to get you branded a nut in contemporary discourse, but constitutional amendments used to be socially acceptable; five have been ratified in my lifetime, most recently in 1992, and I’m considerably younger than Trump.

Still, if constitutional amendments scare you, consider the National Popular Vote Plan. This is an ingenious compact already adopted by 10 states and the District of Columbia—all solidly Democratic, alas—that takes maximum advantage of the absurd latitude Article II gives states in allocating presidential electors (“in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct”). States that sign on to the compact agree to award all their electors to whichever presidential candidate wins the national popular vote—though not until there are enough state signatories to decide the election. That takes 270 electors (out of 538 total). The compact is already more than halfway there, with 165.

However it’s achieved, the Electoral College plainly has outlived whatever usefulness it once had. And perhaps the mood is shifting after November 8. Michael Dukakis, who lost to George H.W. Bush in 1988, is now on board,, and on Tuesday outgoing California Sen. Barbara Boxer filed a bill that would eliminate the Electoral College. Hillary Clinton also suggested the Electoral College should be abolished after Gore won the popular vote in 2000 but still lost to Bush. Bob Dole made similar comments after he and Gerald Ford nearly won the popular vote in 1976 while still losing the Electoral College to Jimmy Carter and Walter Mondale.

Then there’s Trump. He’s against the Electoral College, too—at least some of the time.

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri Nov 18, 2016 11:42 am


And now a word from Mittenius Romney

March 2016


blah blah blah Ronald Reagan ... blah blah ... I believe with all my heart and soul, that we face another time for choosing, one that will have profound consequences for the Republican Party, and more importantly, for our country.

I say this, in part, because of my conviction that America is poised to lead the world for another century. Our technology engines, our innovation dynamic, the ambition and skill of our people are going to propel our economy and raise the standard of living of Americans.

America will remain, as it is today, the envy of the world. You may have seen Warren Buffett. He said, and I think he’s 100 percent right, that “The babies being born in America today are the luckiest crop in history.”

Now, that doesn’t mean we don’t have real problems and serious challenges. We do. At home, poverty persists. And wages are stagnant. The horrific massacres of Paris and San Bernardino. The nuclear ambitions of the Iranian mullahs. The aggressions of Putin. The growing assertiveness of China and the nuclear tests of North Korea confirm that we live in troubled and dangerous times.

But if we make the right choices, America’s future will be even better than our past and better than our present.

On the other hand, if we make improvident choices, the bright horizon I’ve described will not materialize. And let me put it very plainly. If we Republicans choose Donald Trump as our nominee, the prospects for a safe and prosperous future are greatly diminished.

Let me explain why I say that. First on the economy. If Donald Trump’s plans were ever implemented, the country would sink into prolonged recession. A few examples. His proposed 35 percent tariff-like penalties would instigate a trade war and that would raise prices for consumers, kill our export jobs and lead entrepreneurs and businesses of all stripes to flee America.

His tax plan in combination with his refusal to reform entitlements and honestly address spending would balloon the deficit and the national debt. So even though Donald Trump has offered very few specific economic plans, what little he has said is enough to know that he would be very bad for American workers and for American families.

But you say, wait, wait, wait, isn’t he a huge business success? Doesn’t he know what he’s talking about? No, he isn’t and no he doesn’t.

(APPLAUSE)

Look, his bankruptcies have crushed small businesses and the men and women who work for them. He inherited his business, he didn’t create it. And whatever happened to Trump Airlines? How about Trump University? And then there’s Trump Magazine and Trump Vodka and Trump Steaks and Trump Mortgage. A business genius he is not.

Now, not every policy that Donald Trump has floated is bad, of course. He wants to repeal and replace Obamacare. He wants to bring jobs home from China and Japan. But his prescriptions to do those things are flimsy at best. At the last debate, all he could remember about his health care plan was to remove insurance boundaries between states. Successfully bringing jobs home requires serious policy and reforms that make America the place businesses want to come, want to plant and want to grow. You can’t punish business into doing what you want.

Frankly, the only serious policy proposals that deal with a broad range of national challenges we confront today come from Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio and John Kasich. One of these men should be our nominee.

(APPLAUSE) Now, I know that some people want this race to be over. They look at history and say a trend like Mr. Trump’s isn’t going to be stopped. Perhaps. But the rules of political history have pretty much all been shredded during this campaign.

(LAUGHTER)

If the other candidates can find some common ground, I believe we can nominate a person who can win the general election and who will represent the values and policies of conservatism. Given the current delegate selection process, that means that I’d vote for Marco Rubio in Florida and for John Kasich in Ohio and for Ted Cruz or whichever one of the other two contenders has the best chance of beating Mr. Trump in a given state.

Now let me turn to national security and the safety of our homes and loved ones. Mr. Trump’s bombast is already alarming the allies and fueling the enmity of our enemies. Insulting all Muslims will keep many of them from fully engaging with us in the urgent fight against ISIS, and for what purpose? Muslim terrorists would only have to lie about their religion to enter the country.

And then what he said about on “60 Minutes”. Did you hear this? It was about Syria and ISIS, and it has to go down as the most ridiculous and dangerous idea of the entire campaign season. Let ISIS take out Assad, he said, and then we can pick up the remnants.

Now, think about that. Let the most dangerous terror organization the world has ever known take over an entire country? This recklessness is recklessness in the extreme. Now, Donald Trump tells us that he is very, very smart.

(LAUGHTER)

I’m afraid that when it comes to foreign policy he is very, very not smart.

(APPLAUSE)

Now, I’m far from the first to conclude that Donald Trump lacks the temperament to be president. After all, this is an individual who mocked a disabled reporter, who attributed a reporter’s questions to her menstrual cycle, who mocked a brilliant rival who happened to be a woman due to her appearance, who bragged about his marital affairs, and who laces his public speeches with vulgarity.

Donald Trump says he admires Vladimir Putin. There is a dark irony in his boasts of his sexual exploits during the Vietnam War. While at the same time, John McCain, whom he has mocked, was imprisoned and tortured.

Dishonesty is Donald Trump’s hallmark. He claimed that he had spoken clearly and boldly against going into Iraq.

Wrong. He spoke in favor of invading Iraq. He said he saw thousands of Muslims in New Jersey celebrating 9/11.

Wrong. He saw no such thing. He imagined it. He’s not of the temperament of the kind of stable, thoughtful person we need as a leader. His imagination must not be married to real power. The president of the United States has long been the leader of the free world.

The president and, yes, even the nominees of the country’s great parties helped define America to billions of people around the world. All of them bear the responsibility of being an example for our children and our grandchildren.

Think of Donald Trump’s personal qualities. The bullying, the greed, the showing off, the misogyny, the absurd third grade theatrics. You know, we have long referred to him as “The Donald.” He’s the only person in the entire country to whom we have added an article before his name, and it was not because he had attributes we admired.

(LAUGHTER)

Now, imagine your children and your grandchildren acting the way he does. Would you welcome that? Haven’t we seen before what happens when people in prominent positions fail the basic responsibility of honorable conduct? We have. And it always injures our families and our country.

Watch, by the way, how he responds to my speech today.

There’s plenty of evidence that Mr. Trump is a con man, a fake. Mr. Trump has changed his positions not just over the years, but over the course of the campaign. And on the Ku Klux Klan, daily for three days in a row.

We will only really know if he’s a real deal or a phony if he releases his tax returns and the tape of his interview with The New York Times. I predict that there are more bombshells in his tax returns. I predict that he doesn’t give much, if anything, to the disabled and to our veterans. I predict that he told The New York Times that his immigration talk is just that — talk.

And I predict that despite his promise to do so, first made over a year ago, that he will never ever release his tax returns. Never — not the returns under audit; not even the returns that are no longer being audited. He has too much to hide. Nor will he authorize the release of the tapes that he made with The New York Times.

If I’m right, you’ll have all the proof you need to know that Donald Trump is indeed a phony. Attacking me as he surely will won’t prove him any less of a phony. It’s entirely in his hands to prove me wrong. All he has to do is release his back taxes like he promised he would and let us hear what he said behind closed doors to The New York Times.

You know, Ronald Reagan used to quote a Scottish philosopher, who predicted that democracies and civilizations wouldn’t last much longer than a couple hundred years. And John Adams wrote this, “Remember, democracy never lasts long; it soon wastes, exhausts and murders itself. There never was a democracy yet that did not commit suicide.” That’s John Adams.

I believe that America has proven these dire predictions wrong for two reasons. First, we’ve been blessed with great presidents, with giants among us. Men of character, integrity and selflessness have led our nation from the very beginning. None were perfect. Each surely made mistakes. But in every case, they acted out of the desire to do what was right for America and for the cause of freedom.

The second reason is because we’re blessed with a great people — people who at every critical moment of choosing have put the interests of the country above their own. These two things are related. Our presidents time and again have called on us to rise to the occasion. John F. Kennedy asked us to consider what we could do for our country. Lincoln drew upon the better angels of our nature to save the union.

I understand the anger Americans feel today. In the past, our presidents have channeled that anger and forged it into resolve, into endurance and high purpose, and into the will to defeat the enemies of freedom. Our anger was transformed into energy directed for good.

Mr. Trump is directing our anger for less than noble purposes. He creates scapegoats of Muslims and Mexican immigrants. He calls for the use of torture. He calls for killing the innocent children and family members of terrorists. He cheers assaults on protesters. He applauds the prospect of twisting the Constitution to limit First Amendment freedom of the press.

This is the very brand of anger that has led other nations into the abyss.

Here’s what I know. Donald Trump is a phony, a fraud. His promises are as worthless as a degree from Trump University.

He’s playing the members of the American public for suckers. He gets a free ride to the White House and all we get is a lousy hat.


(LAUGHTER)

His domestic policies would lead to recession. His foreign policies would make America and the world less safe. He has neither the temperament nor the judgment to be president and his personal qualities would mean that America would cease to be a shining city on a hill.

I’m convinced America has greatness ahead. And this is a time for choosing. God bless us to choose a nominee who will make that vision a reality.

Thank you and God bless you all.

This has been a word from Mittenius Romney

Yakima Canutt

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Nov 22, 2016 10:19 am


Mike Pence said this weekend he felt no intimidation from the Hamiltonian Rappers and enjoyed the show.

"I wasn't offended by what was said," Pence told "Foxy News Sunday."

well, Mike has thus already bucked Trump a tiny bit, and thusly Mike is accredited one third of a quatloo.

Let us hope that Mike is able to channel the Larry Bird quadrant of his Indiana soul.


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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  woo on Tue Nov 22, 2016 10:22 am


woo

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Nov 22, 2016 10:34 am


There have been two Adamses, two Bushes, two Harrisons, two Johnsons, and two Roosevelts. All of the pairs except the Johnsons were related to each other.

William Henry Harrison was the last president born as a subject of the House Royale of Saxe-Coburg & Gotha.


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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  woo on Tue Nov 22, 2016 10:37 am


woo

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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  pinhedz on Thu Nov 24, 2016 3:53 pm

pinhedz dad says "I couldn't vote for either of them!"

He also refused to vote for FDR. bounce

pinhedz
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Re: Things someone else just wanted to say......

Post  Sponsored content Today at 11:26 pm


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