Performers that Bob like better than the ones that don't like Bob

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Performers that Bob like better than the ones that don't like Bob

Post  pinhedz on Fri Feb 13, 2015 3:24 pm

At the MusiCare awards, Bob tells what he thinks of folks that don't like him:

"Leiber and Stoller didn’t think much of my songs. They didn't like 'em, but Doc Pomus did. That was all right that they didn't like 'em, because I never liked their songs either. "Yakety yak, don't talk back." "Charlie Brown is a clown," "Baby I'm a hog for you." Novelty songs, not serious. Doc's songs, they were better. "This Magic Moment." "Lonely Avenue." “Save the Last Dance for Me.” Those songs broke my heart. I figured I'd rather have his blessings any day than theirs."

"Ahmet Ertegun didn't think much of my songs, but Sam Phillips did. Ahmet founded Atlantic Records. He produced some great records: Ray Charles, Ruth Brown, LaVerne Baker, just to name a few. There were some great records in there, no doubt about it. But Sam Phillips, he recorded Elvis and Jerry Lee, Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash. Radical artists that shook the very essence of humanity. Revolutionaries with vision and foresight. Fearless and sensitive at the same time. Revolution in style and scope. Radical to the bone. Songs that cut you to the bone. Renegades in all degrees, doing songs that would never decay, and still resound to this day. Oh, yeah, I'd rather have Sam Phillips' blessing any day."

"Merle Haggard didn't think much of my songs, but Buck Owens did, and Buck even recorded some of my early songs. Now I admire Merle – "Mama Tried," "Tonight The Bottle Let Me Down," "I'm a Lonesome Fugitive." I understand all that but I can't imagine Waylon Jennings singing "The Bottle Let Me Down." I love Merle but he’s not Buck. Buck Owens wrote "Together Again" and that song trumps anything that ever came out of Bakersfield. Buck Owens and Merle Haggard? If you have to have somebody's blessing – you figure it out. What I’m saying here is that my songs seem to divide people. Even people in the music community."

pinhedz
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Re: Performers that Bob like better than the ones that don't like Bob

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sat Feb 14, 2015 7:36 am

Built like a bear, with a rumbling basso buffo voice to match, Eddie Gorodetsky is an off-the-radar celebrity, a star in two separate pop culture universes but little-known except to insiders.

Today he's on a treasure hunt, searching a half acre of recorded music for gold at Amoeba Records in Hollywood. "This is a song you just won't believe!" He pulls a CD from a jam-packed bin. It's a 1950s track by Calypso king the Mighty Sparrow.

"The character singing is upset because the prostitutes in his favorite bar are old, 'with a face like Jack Palance.' He wants them to step aside and give the younger women a chance. I mean, what a crazy concept for a song!"

As a TV writer, Mr. Gorodetsky, 54, has seven Emmy nominations (and one win). He has written for "SCTV," "Saturday Night Live" and David Letterman. He now works with producer Chuck Lorre on the two most popular half-hour comedies on television—"Two and a Half Men" and "The Big Bang Theory"—plus the new "Mike & Molly." A new project: writing a novel about "celebrity, paparazzi, drugs and superheroes."

He was also the producer of "Theme Time Radio Hour with Bob Dylan," the weekly satellite radio series that from 2006-2009 produced a crazy-quilt mix of genre-and-decade-jumping songs, with running commentary from Mr. Dylan. Much of the material for the 100 episodes was culled from Mr. Gorodetsky's own record collection, which among other eclectic selections contains a vast array of Christmas music. Mr. Gorodetsky made these holiday songs into mixes and sent them to friends for years. Encouraged by Mr. Dylan, Columbia Records released "Christmas Party with Eddie G" in 1991. It's out of print now but a collectors item on Amazon and eBay.

What drives Mr. Gorodetsky most is his zeal for musical archeology—and evangelizing. "I'm not a musician. I don't play an instrument. I can't carry a tune. But I love music and I love sharing it," he says.

Longtime rocker Peter Wolf of the J. Geils Band, who has known Mr. Gorodetsky more than 30 years, describes the impulse: "For people who are beyond obsessed about music, the need to share it is almost like an emergency medical assist—it's your duty to turn the other person on. If you don't, they'll die."

The mix tapes and CDs were intended to do more than spread holiday cheer, says Mr. Gorodetsky. He rails against the homogenization of forms of music that sprang from "whore houses and gambling joints and back alleys." Some marketing efforts turn artists like "Howlin' Wolf into one of the Jamboree Bears."

"It used to make me crazy to hear people say 'I hate country music.' Or 'I hate jazz,'" he says. "True, a lot of twee stuff passes for jazz and country these days, but there is no greater poetry than Hank Williams. I can listen to Lester Young and it breaks my heart. The idea with the mix tapes was to get people to listen to stuff they wouldn't normally listen to—a reggae track here, then a country track, followed by a jump blues tune." He chose Christmas songs because "people will listen to anything if you put sleigh bells on it."

Mr. Gorodetsky no longer circulates his holiday compilations, complaining that the Web has made tastes even less discriminating. "We live in a universe where it's easy to buy music by the pound, where you can download every Christmas song ever recorded," he says. "Having every Christmas song is like having no Christmas songs."

But he continues to troll "bricks and mortar" record stores and produce compilation discs and, lately, MP3 play lists. "It's churlish to flaunt size," he says, but he reluctantly places the size of his collection at more than 10,000 records and more than 140,000 downloads.

Much of the audience for the quirky mixes culled from that trove is a wide and illustrious network of friends, including Mr. Dylan, Mr. Wolf, Elvis Costello, Penn Jillette and Tom Waits. During the 2007 Hollywood writers' strike, Mr. Gorodetsky was joined on the Writers Guild picket line by Mr. Costello. In 1999 he got Mr. Dylan to appear in an episode of the sitcom "Dharma & Greg."

He resolutely won't name-drop. "Eddie never leads with any of that," says Mr. Lorre, who also co-created "Dharma & Greg." "He inhabits an extraordinary world but he moves through it with remarkable modesty."

Born in Providence, R.I., Mr. Gorodetsky was attending Boston's Emerson College in the late 1970s when he began to make a name for himself. With a gift for gab and his already-amazing record collection, he became a DJ at WBCN, Boston's legendary free-form underground radio station.

Frustrated by radio's drift toward classic rock programming—"it was tedious, waiting 10 minutes for the piano coda in "Layla" to end for the 3,000th time,"—Mr. Gorodetsky began producing comedy segments for WBCN, then TV, eventually leading him to Mr. Lorre, a guitarist who played Florida bars in the 1970s. "We share the view that our little genre has a wonderful musicality to it," says the producer.

Mr. Gorodetsky agrees that producing TV is like playing in honky-tonks: "When you're on a roll and you're all kind of clicking it really does feel like you're in a band."

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Re: Performers that Bob like better than the ones that don't like Bob

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sat Sep 05, 2015 1:16 pm




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Re: Performers that Bob like better than the ones that don't like Bob

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