Playing in the dirt yields an antibiotic

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Playing in the dirt yields an antibiotic

Post  pinhedz on Fri Jan 09, 2015 4:33 am

It's a Wrongington post headline: "PLAYING IN THE DIRT YIELDS AN ANTIBIOTIC"

We all knew this--my friend Blair, an only child, had a smothering mother that kept him in his spic-and-span house all the time so he was never exposed to germs. The result? Poor Blair was sick all the time. Neutral

The pinhedz mother told her six kids every morning "Get out of here! and don't come back before lunch unless you're actively bleeding! and don't bleed on the carpet!"

So the pinhed accumulated 400 days of unused sick leave.

When was the last time you played in the dirt?

Today's pinheded wisdom--volunteer for hiking trail maintenance. The drainage features need constant work--the water needs to be directed off the trail--repair those water bars and check dams, see if new one's are needed at problematic locations, dig, dig, DIG!

It's for you own good. Shocked  Get out there and get dirty. bounce

[GEEZZ--the pinhed is SO insufferably PEDANTIC. Razz]

pinhedz
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Re: Playing in the dirt yields an antibiotic

Post  pinhedz on Tue Apr 28, 2015 12:16 pm

This just in from Kim Lewis at Northeaster U, by way of Nature magazine:

" ….  Most antibiotics are derived from natural products secreted by bacteria and fungi that live in the soil, including widely used drugs such as Terramycin, Vancomycin and Streptomycin."

"So Lewis, collaborating with a company he co-founded called NovoBiotic Pharmaceuticals, started examining the natural compounds secreted by his newly isolated soil bacteria to look for potential new antibiotics."

"They've already found more than two dozen. And one of them, which they've named teixobactin, looked like a winner: It's deadly to several different kinds of disease-causing bacteria and isn't toxic to mice."

"It cured mice of skin and thigh and lung infections," Lewis says.

"In the lab the compound killed bacteria that cause serious staph infections, strep and tuberculosis. But the best part came when they ran another set of crucial tests."

"The most intriguing thing about this compound is the apparent absence of resistance development," Lewis says.

"It seems that disease-causing bacteria don't become resistant to this antibiotic. And that's because the antibiotic latches on to parts of the bacteria's cell wall that can't mutate. Mutations are how bacteria typically develop defenses against drugs.

'So Lewis is making a bold claim, tentative as it may be: "This for all practical purposes may be a largely resistance-free compound," he says.'

"That's pretty exciting news, I think, for the field," says Gerry Wright, director of the Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario.

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