Bruckner

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Bruckner

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri Nov 14, 2014 10:15 am


Betty Shabazz was a fan.


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Re: Bruckner

Post  pinhedz on Sun Nov 16, 2014 7:31 am

Lesson #98:

Keep the acceptance speech short:

"Lady and gentlemen, because I working in this town for twenty-five years, I like to make some kind of appreciation to very important factor what make me successful to lots of my colleagues in this town. I’d like to thank Johannes Brahms, Johann Strauss, Richard Strauss, Beethoven, Mozart, George Gershwin, Jerome Kern, Wagner, Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov. Thank you."

--Dmitri Tiomkin

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Re: Bruckner

Post  pinhedz on Sat Nov 29, 2014 6:07 am

Of course, to write film music on Yakima's terms (which are probably also the director's terms) means that the composer can't have much ego--which is not normal for an artiste.

Eric Korngold would never have gor into the biz on Yakima's terms,  bounce because he considered a film score to be an opera, which the actors just sort of talking their lines instead of singing.

In fact, Korngold said he would not score any movie with Errol Flynn in it--until he got the word that the Nazi's had taken over his properties back in his heimat. Neutral


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Re: Bruckner

Post  pinhedz on Sat Nov 29, 2014 6:14 am

The Los Angeles Times says all of this about Leonard Berstein's horrible experience as a soundtrack ("On The Waterfront") composer:

Instead of returning home to New York after the score was completed, Bernstein hung around for the picture's audio mix. He wrote about it in a New York Times essay he datelined, tongue in cheek, "Upper Dubbing, California." He described a "frustrating and maddening" series of reduced-volume, truncated and even lost musical moments.

"I found myself pleading for a beloved G-flat," he reported. "Sometimes the music, which had been planned ... with a beginning, middle and end, would be silenced seven bars before the end." It's instructive to note that the newspaper story, published before the film's opening, concluded with the line, "It was a glorious experience; I wouldn't have missed it for anything." The version published in Bernstein's 1959 book, "The Joy of Music," while nearly 700 words longer, omits that upbeat sentiment.

Many years later, Kazan complained about some of Bernstein's choices in a way that makes the composer's initial hesitance about heading to Hollywood seem prescient: "I try not to bring another personality into the picture through the music," said Kazan, "but there was no way to avoid that with Lenny," he told author Jeff Young. "So you're aware of the music. It put the picture on the level of almost operatic melodrama here and there."

Bernstein adapted the basic musical material of "Waterfront" into the Suite in mid-1955-partly because, unlike the film score, which was owned by Columbia, his contract specified that he would own and therefore profit from any concert work he cared to derive from it. But, more importantly, the Suite was a convenient way to ensure that the music would live on in a more musically coherent form in the concert hall, a la Prokoviev's "Alexander Nevsky" and Copland's "The Red Pony."

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Re: Bruckner

Post  pinhedz on Fri Jan 02, 2015 10:32 am

I have often heard the pronouncement the soundtrack music must be unobtrusive, so that the viewers are not consciously aware of it, lest they be distracted from the action and the witty repartee.

But what if no one talks and no one moves?

-- "What a pity we're about to break these fancy furnishings."

-- "Let's say that the first to break a piece of furniture loses."


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Re: Bruckner

Post  Guest on Fri Jan 02, 2015 8:12 pm

I don't speak that chino language but I think that is a bit hortera

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Re: Bruckner

Post  pinhedz on Sat Jan 03, 2015 12:23 am

doktora evola wrote:... a bit hortera

Thomas Kent -- "Why, it's a house of ill repute!" Shocked

Shakespeare -- "But of excellent reputation."

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Re: Bruckner

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