Beethoven goes Russian

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Beethoven goes Russian

Post  pinhedz on Wed Aug 27, 2014 10:18 am

Skill level--Asian:


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Re: Beethoven goes Russian

Post  pinhedz on Wed Aug 27, 2014 10:21 am

Variations on Kolomeyka.
Why did I choose to watch this pianist for 10 minutes instead of Alfred Berndel?


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Re: Beethoven goes Russian

Post  pinhedz on Wed Aug 27, 2014 10:22 am

Most Russian of all Beethoven compositions (but short):




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Re: Beethoven goes Russian

Post  pinhedz on Wed Aug 27, 2014 10:24 am

Count Razumovskiy said he wanted Russian tunes in his quartets:


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Re: Beethoven goes Russian

Post  pinhedz on Wed Aug 27, 2014 10:25 am

Poles like this:


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Re: Beethoven goes Russian

Post  pinhedz on Wed Aug 27, 2014 10:41 am

Correction--Constanza Principe is not playing Kolomeyka--she's playing Kamarinskaya (how embarrassing for the pinhed--I hope Svetlana didn't notice Embarassed ).

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Re: Beethoven goes Russian

Post  pinhedz on Wed Aug 27, 2014 11:14 am

pinhedz wrote:Most Russian of all Beethoven compositions (but short):


Now some internetters are trying to say that Minka is not a Russian song at all, and that it was first composed by Yookeranians. Shocked



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Re: Beethoven goes Russian

Post  pinhedz on Wed Aug 27, 2014 11:16 am

Some even claim it is a folk song of the Hebraique peoples of North America.


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Re: Beethoven goes Russian

Post  pinhedz on Wed Aug 27, 2014 11:34 am

pinhedz wrote:

Alex sez:

Alexander Alex1 year ago
Слова украинские, но видно, что поют не украинцы.

But Alex says this in Russian, so what does he know? Razz

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Re: Beethoven goes Russian

Post  pinhedz on Wed Aug 27, 2014 11:57 am

The Kozak words are said to have been written by Semen Klymovsky in the 19th century, but the older words "Oi Ne Khody Hrytsiu ..." are attributed to the the kozak poet-enchantress Marusia Churai (1625–1653):


Here are Marusia Churai's words sung (its similar to "Yes, my darling daughter," but the guy ends up dead):



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Re: Beethoven goes Russian

Post  pinhedz on Wed Aug 27, 2014 12:16 pm

But, no matter which words one sings, I think everyone knows that the tune was written by Catterino Albertovich Cavos (Катери́но Альбе́ртович Ка́вос) (October 30, 1775 – May 10, 1840), born Catarino Camillo Cavos, the Music Director of the Imperial Theatre of St. Petersburg:


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Re: Beethoven goes Russian

Post  pinhedz on Wed Aug 27, 2014 12:48 pm

But Marusia Churai's 500-year-old words tell of how Hryts's mother warned him not to go out with her--but he went anyway, and she fed Hryts the poison zillyachkos:

Oh do not go, Hryts, and party,
For party girl is sorceress!
The girl that has black eyebrows,
That melting girl knows all magic.

On Sunday morning the herbs she dug,
And on Monday the herbs she washed,
It's Tuesday - the herbs she cooked,
And on Wednesday early Hryts she poisoned.

So come Thursday - and Hryts already died.
Came Friday - they buried Hryts.
But early on Saturday mother beat daughter:
"Wherefore thou, O daughter, poisoned Hryts?"

"Oh Mama, mama, Hryts regret not,
Why is Hryts, mother, loves two together!
Let it not be her, nor me,
Let remaineth Hryts in the damp ground!"

"And this is you, Hryts, I did just that,
That because you have me beat!
Therefore you, Hryts, wages for no purpose -
Of the four boards your oaken house!"

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Re: Beethoven goes Russian

Post  pinhedz on Fri Aug 29, 2014 7:30 am

The Ukrainian Wiki says that Marusia (1625-1653) loved a Kozak (named either Hryts Bobrenko, or Hryts Ostapenko) and that she poisoned him for two-timing.

Marusia used the Tarnower defense--she said she made the poison for herself, and Hryts drank it accidentally.Suspect

She was convicted and sentenced to death, but then pardoned because of her father's brilliant military record in the service of the Tsar, and "because she writes really good songs."

Then she either went on a pilgrimage, or entered a nunnery, and died of TB at age 28.

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Re: Beethoven goes Russian

Post  pinhedz on Sun Sep 07, 2014 4:59 pm

For completeness I should mention that "Yes My Darling Daughter" was the hit that put Dinah Shore in the spotlight way back in 1940.

At the time, Dinah Shore was thought to be a southern belle, because her Eastern-European roots were not immediately evident.

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Re: Beethoven goes Russian

Post  Yakima Canutt on Wed Sep 10, 2014 1:33 am

After agreeing on a remuneration of four ducats for each song adaptation in 1814, Beethoven requested a subsequent payment for three Scottish songs delivered later. In a letter from March 1818 Beethoven claimed he had only received three ducats instead of the determined remuneration. Thomson, however, replied that the bill issued by the Fries bank certainly stated 12 ducats. Either Beethoven was mistaking or Fries had written the bill only after Beethoven had asked him to do so.

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Re: Beethoven goes Russian

Post  pinhedz on Wed Sep 10, 2014 4:25 am

Yakima Canutt wrote:Either Beethoven was mistaking or Fries had written the bill only after Beethoven had asked him to do so.
The latter is surely the truth--that's how those rascals operate. bounce

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