Greet Titanosaur

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Greet Titanosaur

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue May 20, 2014 7:05 am

-130 foots long w/ the power of fourteen and a half elephants

-vegan

-if other dinosaurs tried to eat this Titanosaur, they would lose they teeth


Last edited by Yakima Canutt on Fri May 15, 2015 2:35 pm; edited 2 times in total

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Re: Greet Titanosaur

Post  pinhedz on Tue May 20, 2014 9:51 am

And now they saying that T-rex was also vegan--with those dainty little hands and fingers. Shocked

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Re: Greet Titanosaur

Post  Yakima Canutt on Wed Jul 23, 2014 2:51 pm

i thot they were saying T-Rex was a scavenger ... in any case, Rex mos def was NOT the Lizard King ... that title belongs to Emperor Spino -


he maybe wasn't quite this spiny, but this is the general gist


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Re: Greet Titanosaur

Post  Yakima Canutt on Mon Aug 11, 2014 7:18 am

listen yoo scrooheads, here is a spinosaurus who stood up against the allosauri, the ankylosauri, the pteranodon ... some day a real rain will come and wash away every pachycephalosaurus


lesson: it's easier to break foolz' neckz when you have functioning arms

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Re: Greet Titanosaur

Post  Yakima Canutt on Thu May 14, 2015 3:07 pm





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Re: Greet Titanosaur

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri May 15, 2015 2:39 pm

Yakima Canutt wrote:-130 foots long w/ the power of fourteen and a half elephants

Which Titanosaur are you talkin bout?


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Re: Greet Titanosaur

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri May 15, 2015 2:39 pm

Argentinosaurus

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Re: Greet Titanosaur

Post  pinhedz on Fri May 15, 2015 2:52 pm

I read that they didn't even take care of their kids. Suspect

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Re: Greet Titanosaur

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri May 15, 2015 3:01 pm

Gupta says that the thing about dinosaurs being bad parents is yesterday's lies. Gupta says the dino looks a reptile but is more like a bird, including when the parents is putting worms into the baby beak. or maybe just some dinos are nice parents and others aren't.

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Re: Greet Titanosaur

Post  pinhedz on Fri May 15, 2015 3:04 pm

San-Jay Gupta? Suspect

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Re: Greet Titanosaur

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri May 15, 2015 3:08 pm


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Re: Greet Titanosaur

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri May 15, 2015 11:00 pm

The idea that birds—the most diverse group of land vertebrates, with nearly 10,000 living species—descended directly from dinosaurs isn't new. It was raised by the English biologist Thomas Henry Huxley in his 1870 treatise, Further Evidence of the Affinity between the Dinosaurian Reptiles and Birds. Huxley, a renowned anatomist perhaps best remembered for his ardent defense of Charles Darwin's theory of evolution, saw little difference between the bone structure of Compsognathus, a dinosaur no bigger than a turkey, and Archaeopteryx, which was discovered in Germany and described in 1861. When Huxley looked at ostriches and other modern birds, he saw smallish dinosaurs. If a baby chicken's leg bones were enlarged and fossilized, he noted, "there would be nothing in their characters to prevent us from referring them to the Dinosauria."

Still, over the decades researchers who doubted the dinosaur-bird link also made good anatomical arguments. They said dinosaurs lack a number of features that are distinctly avian, including wishbones, or fused clavicles; bones riddled with air pockets; flexible wrist joints; and three-toed feet. Moreover, the posited link seemed contrary to what everyone thought they knew: that birds are small, intelligent, speedy, warmblooded sprites, whereas dinosaurs—from the Greek for "fearfully great lizard"—were coldblooded, dull, plodding, reptile-like creatures.

In the late 1960s, a fossilized dinosaur skeleton from Montana began to undermine that assumption. Deinonychus, or "terrible claw" after the sickle-shaped talon on each hind foot, stood about 11 feet from head to tail and was a lithe predator. Moreover, its bone structure was similar to that of Archaeopteryx. Soon scientists were gathering other intriguing physical evidence, finding that fused clavicles were common in dinosaurs after all. Deinonychus and Velociraptor bones had air pockets and flexible wrist joints. Dinosaur traits were looking more birdlike all the time. "All those things were yanked out of the definition of being a bird," says paleontologist Matthew Carrano of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.

But there was one important feature that had not been found in dinosaurs, and few experts would feel entirely comfortable asserting that chickadees and triceratops were kin until they had evidence for this missing anatomical link: feathers.

A poor Chinese farmer, Li Yingfang, made one of the greatest fossil finds of all time, in August 1996 in Sihetun village, an hour's drive from the site where I'd prospected for fossil fish. "I was digging holes for planting trees," recalls Li, who now has a full-time job at a dinosaur museum built at that very site. From a hole he unearthed a two-foot-long shale slab. An experienced fossil hunter, Li split the slab and beheld a creature unlike any he had seen. The skeleton had a birdlike skull, a long tail and impressions of what appeared to be feather-like structures.

Because of the feathers, Ji Qiang, then the director of the National Geological Museum, which bought one of Li's slabs, assumed it was a new species of primitive bird. But other Chinese paleontologists were convinced it was a dinosaur.

On a visit to Beijing that October, Philip Currie, a paleontologist now at the University of Alberta, saw the specimen and realized it would turn paleontology on its head. The next month, Currie, a longtime China hand, showed a photograph of it to colleagues at the annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. The picture stole the show. "It was such an amazing fossil," recalls paleontologist Hans-Dieter Sues of the National Museum of Natural History. "Sensational." Western paleontologists soon made a pilgrimage to Beijing to see the fossil. "They came back dazed," Sues says.

Despite the feathers, the skeleton left no doubt that the new species, named Sinosauropteryx, meaning "Chinese lizard wing," was a dinosaur. It lived around 125 million years ago, based on the dating of radioactive elements in the sediments that encased the fossil. Its integumentary filaments—long, thin structures protruding from its scaly skin—convinced most paleontologists that the animal was the first feathered dinosaur ever unearthed. A dozen dinosaurs with filaments or feathers have since been discovered at that site.By analyzing specimens from China, paleontologists have filled in gaps in the fossil record and traced the evolutionary relationships among various dinosaurs. The fossils finally have confirmed, to all but a few skeptics, that birds descended from dinosaurs and are the living representatives of a dinosaur lineage called the Maniraptorans.

Most dinosaurs were not part of the lineage that gave rise to birds; they occupied other branches of the dinosaur family tree. Sinosauropteryx, in fact, was what paleontologists call a non-avian dinosaur, even though it had feathers. This insight has prompted paleontologists to revise their view of other non-avian dinosaurs, such as the notorious meat eater Velociraptor and even some members of the tyrannosaur group. They, too, were probably adorned with feathers.

The abundance of feathered fossils has allowed paleontologists to examine a fundamental question: Why did feathers evolve? Today, it's clear that feathers perform many functions: they help birds retain body heat, repel water and attract a mate. And of course they aid flight—but not always, as ostriches and penguins, which have feathers but do not fly, demonstrate. Many feathered dinosaurs did not have wings or were too heavy, relative to the length of their feathered limbs, to fly.

Deciphering how feathers morphed over the ages from spindly fibers to delicate instruments of flight would shed light on the transition of dinosaurs to birds, and how natural selection forged this complex trait. Few scientists know ancient feathers more intimately than IVPP's Xu Xing. He has discovered 40 dinosaur species—more than any other living scientist—from all over China. His office at IVPP, across the street from the Beijing Zoo, is cluttered with fossils and casts.

Xu envisions feather evolution as an incremental process. Feathers in their most primitive form were single filaments, resembling quills, that jutted from reptilian skin. These simple structures go way back; even pterodactyls had filaments of sorts. Xu suggests that feather evolution may have gotten started in a common ancestor of pterodactyls and dinosaurs—nearly 240 million years ago, or some 95 million years before Archaeopteryx.

After the emergence of single filaments came multiple filaments joined at the base. Next to appear in the fossil record were paired barbs shooting off a central shaft. Eventually, dense rows of interlocking barbs formed a flat surface: the basic blueprint of the so-called pennaceous feathers of modern birds. All these feather types have been found in fossil impressions of theropods, the dinosaur suborder that includes Tyrannosaurus rex as well as birds and other Maniraptorans.







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