Death to CNN

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Death to CNN

Post  pinhedz on Fri May 09, 2014 8:35 am

DEATH TO CNN

The announcers on CNN convey an intense sense of urgency.

Public officials MUST ANSWER OUR QUESTIONS. 

We (i.e. CNN) must know what they know, what they are doing about, why didn't they do it earlier, why didn't they do it better, and WHY ARE THEY NOT ANSWERING FASTER. Mad
(CNN might loose viewers during the down time--people might go to the WEB instead. Neutral ).  

When CNN gets the answers, are they going to fix the situation?Suspect 

If not (and the answer is NOT) why not? Why hasn't CNN found the plane, freed the hostages, and rescued the landslide victims?

If they can't do that, what are they good for? [answer: not a dad-gummed thing]

Every second a public official spends preparing talking points for the media, is time taken away from dealing with the emergency.bounce 

We don't need CNN, people, they're worse than useless--they're in the way. 

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Re: Death to CNN

Post  pinhedz on Fri May 09, 2014 8:46 am

If uzi was here, of course he would say that the pinhed (as usual Rolling Eyes ) is taking the side of the public officials, f'rinstance by saying that the gub'mint should spend more time doing it's job and less time trying to convince the media it's doing it's job. Rolling Eyes 

But, like I was saying, DEATH TO CNN.

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Re: Death to CNN

Post  Old Mack on Fri May 09, 2014 9:08 am

TV news is no longer 'news' it's entertainment !

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Re: Death to CNN

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue May 20, 2014 6:42 pm

I spoke to Uzi not that long ago and it is very doubtful Uzi would defend the 24-7 Commercial News Cycle, or CNN  since they have staked out the Dreck 'n' Dross 'n' Bigfoot Sightings middle-ground between ultraliberal MSNBC and ultrapatriotic FOXNews.

Uzi says the only good CNN show is Bourdain's Food & Travel Show, and the Sunday programmes Global Public Square with your host Fareed Zakaria, and Reliable Sources ( a critique of the media ) are both OK.  Jake Tapper is a good journo, but he is forced to endlessly report on Malaysian UFO sightings like everyone else, maybe one day he will get a real show, but don't hold breaths,

Uzi also said screenwriter Roberto Orci has no previous experience as a director. So naturally Paramount just hired him to direct Star Trek 3.

By all accounts, the current incarnation of Star Trek is at a crossroads. On the one hand, by rebooting the franchise to feature much younger (and by all accounts, different) versions of our favorite sci-fi heroes, Paramount found a viable way of rescuing a more or less DOA property while keeping the original fans invested. Yes, some purists balked at the revisionism, but considering most film fans today had parents who weren’t even born when the TV series redefined the genre back in 1966 (that’s 48 years, folks), such tinkering could be tolerated. Even when an untried J.J. Abrams was handed the keys to the Starship Enterprise, most appreciated his dedication to the past with obvious bows to filmmaking (and blockbusters) circa 2009.
 
Then Into Darkness arrived and changed all that. Many felt it went overboard on such antithetical to Trek elements like F/X battles and space spectacle, while some still haven’t forgiven it for besmirching one of the most sacred texts in the Roddenberry Universe - the story of super soldier Khan Noonien Singh. Even with such concerns, the sequel went on to earn big bucks worldwide, meaning another installment in the series was all but inevitable. Fans took to social media to express their wants/desires while Abrams jumped ship to restart another beloved interstellar effort - Star Wars. Then the news arrived last week that screenwriter Roberto Orci had been hired to helm Star Trek 3: Whatever We’re Calling It Today and the web went catawampus.

Orci, you see, was part of an infamous partnership with fellow scribe and friend Alex Kurtzman. Together, they cut their teeth in television, working on such shows as Sam Raimi’s Hercules: The Legendary Journeys, Xena: Warrior Princess, and Jack of All Trades before heading over to Abrams’ Bad Robot brand for Alias and Fringe. In between, they penned many of Michael Bay’s most recent over the top travesties, including The Island, Transformers, and Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen before jumping over to Spider-Man to reboot the character with Amazing and the recent Amazing 2. Now the duo have called it quits, amicably, with Kurtzman’s future uncertain and Orci being handed one of the highest profile gigs in Tinseltown. And he has absolutely no experience as a director.

That’s right. No TV credits. No short films. No graduate degree experiments from USC, UCLA, NYC, or Sunscreen. According to almost all published reports. Orci is being given a gift by Paramount for guiding the first two films to almost $800 million in worldwide revenue. Now, this isn’t unusual. The equally untalented - at least when it comes to directing - Akiva Goldsman got Warner Bros. to cough up a budget of $60 million so he could besmirch everything that author Mark Helprin created with his crowd-pleasing novel Winter’s Tale - and all it took for him was an Oscar, Dan Brown, and some blackmail photos of Will Smith (that last bit’s a joke) to earn that opportunity. Even with a bank-load of cash as a result of his scripting, he proved that, when it came to helming a magic realism fantasy romance, he’s one heck of a typist.

Orci doesn’t even have Goldsman’s track record. Some could argue that it’s more condensed and commercially viable, but it seems odd that a man who is seen as ancillary to the success of many of the projects he’s been involved in would trump someone who needed an Academy Award to get his dream project greenlit. True, Bad Robot is still involved with Star Trek 3, but hiring from within just doesn’t make sense here. Again, Orci has NO skill set beyond the laptop and there’s a lot riding on this. Do Part 3 right and Star Trek will continue on for another few films. Mess it up, and you severely jeopardize a major Summer tentpole.

Of course, those indifferent about the choice point to Leonard Nimoy (Search for Spock, The Voyage Home) and William Shatner (The Final Frontier) as examples of inexperienced filmmakers pro and con, but both had numerous TV credits before tackling the franchise. Generations’ David Carson, First Contact/Insurrection‘s Jonathan Frakes and Nemesis‘s Stuart Baird also had experience behind the lens before tackling Trek. Orci will be the first and only “filmmaker” in the history of the franchise to have no previous directing experience. And when you think about the number of artists who could have been chosen, his selection seems more and more like a case of industry nepotism and blatant favoritism.

There are dozens of deserving indie auteurs, each who could bring their own unique perspective to the property. After all, Warner Bros. just handed over their multimillion dollar Godzilla reboot to an untried Englishman - Gareth Edwards - with one significant credit to his name (Monsters) and that worked out great. It’s called thinking outside the box, about avoiding the appearance of impropriety while doing the best for both the film in question and the fans in general.

Not in this case. Orci will be supported as having “earned” this chance and Paramount seems perfectly happy to let him succeed or fail on their dime. And who knows - maybe there’s a hidden Spielberg inside the man. Of course, he will have to make a near masterpiece to please some people. Orci has a “reputation” as a 9/11 denier/‘truther’ (we’re not even going to get into that) and took to social media last year when fans were dissing Into Darkness left and right. The result? Let’s just say, he didn’t make a lot of friends with his sometimes incoherent “get over yourselves” rants. It’s one thing to have contempt for those whom you are expected to please. It’s another to be wholly unable to deliver on what you were hired for. So far, all signs point to Orci being the wrong choice. He can prove all of us wrong. Sadly, some of us sense we are more than right.

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Re: Death to CNN

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue May 20, 2014 7:27 pm

I tried to explain to Uzi that the sitch was a bit more nuanced than that. Sigh. Roberto Orci is one of those people who is simultaneously unknown and infamous. Why? Because: Internet. If you don’t know him, you know his work. Alongside longtime collaborator Alex Kurtzman, Orci co-wrote some of the biggest franchises in Hollywood: Their names are on Transformerses and Star Treks and most recently The Amazing Spider-Man 2. Orci and Kurtzman co-created two swell genre shows (Fringe and Sleepy Hollow) and still cash checks on the Hawaii Five-O reboot. (Also, Cowboys & Aliens.)

Orci has always been a key figure in Paramount’s rebooted Star Trek series. Although the films’ creative team included Kurtzman, director J.J. Abrams, and producer/co-writer/conscience Damon Lindelof, Orci was outspoken about the personal connection he felt to Gene Roddenberry’s spacefaring franchise. During the years between 2009′s Star Trek and last year’s Into Darkness, he occasionally interacted with fans directly, participating in the comment boards over at TrekMovie.com under the name “boborci.”

So it made sense last week when Deadline reported that he was lobbying hard to take over for J.J. Abrams and direct the as-yet-untitled Star Trek threeboot. Today, Variety reports that he has officially gotten the job. A rep for Paramount had no comment when contacted by EW, but the choice makes sense. Paramount is a little light on franchises just now — recall that Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit was a thing that happened, barely — and Star Trek is a trusted multimedia brand approaching a major anniversary.

So Paramount is pushing Star Trek 3, stat. But there’s a problem, maybe. Star Trek Into Darkness was a relatively well-received blockbuster. It made $467 million worldwide, which is bizarrely not-great according to the sad-clown economics of modern Hollywood. It got pretty good reviews. And then everything…changed. By the end of summer 2013, the reputation of Star Trek Into Darkness among hardcore Trek fans had sunk as far as a Trek movie can sink.

And Orci was a key figure in that descending reputation. Remember how I mentioned that he enjoyed interacting with the fans in comment boards? Last September, “boborci” posted several messages underneath a TrekMovie.com post titled “Star Trek is broken.” Some key lines:

'I think the article above is akin to a child acting out against his parents. Makes it tough for some to listen, but since I am a loving parent, I read these comments without anger or resentment, no matter how misguided.

There is a reason why I get to write the movies, and you don’t.

STID has infinetly [sic] more social commentary than Raiders [of the Lost Ark] in every Universe, and I say that with Harrison Ford being a friend. You lose credibility big time when you don’t honestly engage with the F—ING WRITER OF THE MOVIE ASKING YOU AN HONEST QUESTION. You prove the cliche of s—y fans. And rude in the process. So, as Simon Pegg would say: F— OFF!'


Orci later apologized for his comments via Twitter, and then deleted his Twitter account completely. Recent geek history is filled with once-beloved creators who run afoul of their own fanbase. (Just ask Lindelof.) But Trek fans’ suspicion of Orci goes a bit deeper than a comment-board scuffle. Back when Orci still tweeting, he occasionally made statements that many interpreted as supportive of the 9/11 Truther movement. (You can get some of the flavor of that from this TrekMovie.com post’s comment board, where, among other things, “boborci” disputes the idea that Osama Bin Laden was behind the 9/11 attacks.)

The soft way of putting this is that Orci appears to be a bit of a “conspiracy nut.” This only really matters to the extent that Star Trek Into Darkness is now widely interpreted as a 9/11 Truther Allegory, with Benedict Cumberbatch’s Khan reconfigured as a “terrorist” who is actually working for the government, sort of. (Devin Faraci at BadassDigest has the best summation of this particular Into Darkness critique, describing the film as “a crypto-truther conspiracy movie.”)

All of this helps to explain why, when I wrote a post last week about Paramount go-aheading Star Trek 3 with Orci directing, these were the kind of the comments that popped up:

ChowYunPhat: Oh, goody. Maybe he can make ST3 a 9/11 was an inside job allegory. I’d so enjoy hearing some more of his crackpot truther gibberish.

alistaircrane: Honestly, in order to save this franchise, Paramount needs to hire someone completely unassociated with JJ Abrams. He and his ilk don’t give two f**ks about Star Trek. THANKFULLY these films are set in an alternate timeline and don’t affect the real Star Trek universe, but I hate that these films are some young people’s first taste of Trek. They’re getting a completely wrong message about Star Trek.

Tommy: He helped ruin Transformers, his script for the new Spider-Man was just dreadfu, and Into Darkness had a miserable script elevated by the game cast and JJ Abrams’ energy and sense of excitement. He attacked Trek fans online (told them to ‘eff’ off) and he was tweeting that the Boston bombings were perpetrated by US government, mere minutes after the bombs went off while people were dying and injured. He’s entitled to defend his work and to his nonsensical conspiracy theories, but that’s just classless.

jenn43: Please never say “go-aheading” again, Franich. It’s even more insipid than the other teenage girl phrases and words you try to invent.


Now, let’s take a moment to dev-advo. Dev-Advo (verb): Teen-girl abreev for “devil’s advocate.” You could argue that Orci’s clear fascination with upper-level political issues is precisely the kind of engagement that you’d want out of a creative force behind a major science-fiction franchise. Plenty of science-fiction greats have held unpopular political opinions, and the genre itself encourages a kind of twisted-mirror Rorschach test for the audience’s own ideas. (Some people think Robert Heinlein was a fascist, and some people think he was a hippie, and some people really like how he wrote about cool space stuff.)

To my eyes, Into Darkness is way too scattershot to read as a direct allegory for anything. Here at EW, we’re generally fans of the Abrams Trek movies — moreso the ebullient Star Trek than the excessive Into Darkness, but surely we can all agree that there are worse things than Khan’s Magic Resurrection Blood, and those things are Romulan Tom Hardy Picard and Evil Space God. Sure, Orci picked a fight in the comment boards — but don’t we kind of want our geek-franchise creators to be something more than happy-smiley fan-service deliverymen?

And it’s important to remember that Orci was just a collaborator in those movies. If you don’t like Into Darkness, it’s unfair to put all of that at Orci’s feet. Arguably, it makes more sense to read the Star Trek reboots as Abrams’ demo reel for Star Wars: Young Kirk = Luke Skywalker, Old Spock = Ben Kenobi, R2-D2 = In Star Trek now for some reason. Orci clearly feels a strong devotion to the Trek brand, and if nothing else, Into Darkness seemed to finally bring the reboot franchise up to the beginning of the original series, with the Enterprise out in the frontier exploring new civilizations.

Blockbuster-sized productions generally take two years to put together once a director is announced — and 2016 will mark the fiftieth anniversary of Star Trek, an occasion for considerable cross-promotion, celebration, maybe even new spinoffs. (Orci has talked in the past about a new Star Trek TV project.) Which means we probably have two years until we really see what a Roberto Orci Star Trek movie looks like — and two years of ambient skepticism or outright hostility about what a Roberto Orci Star Trek movie could be.

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Re: Death to CNN

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue May 20, 2014 9:24 pm

I looked at some of the "boborci" comments, and it seems he is among the more reasonable of conspiracy nuts -

"As far as 911 goes, half of the 911 commissioners themselves are on record as stating that we dont have the full story and that Norad lied to them for years, and they still don’t know why. Doesn’t mean bush and cheney did it. There could be a cover up for some other, legitimate national security reason. That should not however, stop us from asking questions to get the full story."

http://trekmovie.com/2011/10/07/orci-kurtzman-sell-political-conspiracy-western-pilots-abrams-adds-another-movie-project/



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Re: Death to CNN

Post  woo on Wed May 21, 2014 7:11 am

Yakima Canutt wrote:
Uzi says the only good CNN show is Bourdain's Food & Travel Show...


Indeed.


A must see:



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Re: Death to CNN

Post  pinhedz on Wed May 21, 2014 8:28 am

Yakima Canutt wrote: ... That should not however, stop us from asking questions to get the full story."
And then we'll have another topic for gossip, yes?

Or is there a loftier purpose? The pinhed is sincerely looking for a loftier purpose--he just doesn't see it. Suspect

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Re: Death to CNN

Post  Yakima Canutt on Wed May 21, 2014 8:46 am

some times on The Bourdain Show, Bourdain will have to make gumbo in a warzone or goulash with poisonous bugs flying over his head, but he will still tell you factoids while he does it.


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Re: Death to CNN

Post  Yakima Canutt on Wed May 21, 2014 8:46 am

pinhedz wrote:
Yakima Canutt wrote: ... That should not however, stop us from asking questions to get the full story."
And then we'll have another topic for gossip, yes?

Or is there a loftier purpose? The pinhed is sincerely looking for a loftier purpose--he just doesn't see it. Suspect



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Re: Death to CNN

Post  woo on Wed May 21, 2014 9:07 am

Yakima Canutt wrote:some times on The Bourdain Show, Bourdain will have to make gumbo in a warzone or goulash with poisonous bugs flying over his head, but he will still tell you factoids while he does it.



http://skift.com/2014/05/12/anthony-bourdains-parts-unknown-episode-5-inside-present-day-russia/



"The best episode of Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown season three aired last night with a raucous critical look at Putin’s Russia. The episode was filmed in February 2014 just before the start of the Sochi Olympics and Bourdain doesn’t hold back when it comes to shining the light on Putin’s power and lies.

Bourdain and the ZPZ Productions team start their trip in Moscow with old friend and local dissident Zamir Gotta.

Bourdain and Gotta kick off the trip with a nauseating amount of vodka and Russian tapas including pickles, olives, cavier and white fish. Our star quickly voices his opinion of the man discussed through much of this episode calling out Putin’s probable height complex and likening him to “Donald Trump but shorter.”

The entire episode is an exercise in finding, observing and commenting the absurdity of Putin’s Russia. For example, Bourdain attends a massive demonstration where critics voice different, sometimes opposing complaints about Putin. The demonstration is well organized and maintained with more policemen than attendees and a pre-approved route.

Bourdain and Gotta then meet with another of Putin’s most vocal critics, a man named Boris. Over a meal of minced beef dumplings, the trio discuss the very clear signs that Putin sends to people who threaten his rule.


Although it’s obvious he is the force behind dissident’s poisonous deaths and an inside man who awards billion-dollar development contracts to old friends, no one does a thing about it.

“Everybody understands everything in this country,” sums up Boris.

Bourdain and Gotta then travel outside of Moscow to meet another critic, an international billionaire who’s lost millions running one of the only investigative newspapers in the country. Six of his reporters have already been killed for reporting on human rights abuses.

Bourdain continues to meet with Russian locals who continue to fight against the system and attempt to speak about a covered up and dangerous truth.

He meets with members of the band Louna, a band that uses music to speak out against Putin’s rule. The band was supposed to be a part of an MTV documentary, but cut due to political pressure.

He meets with Kseniia Krabrykh, an openly gay artist in Russia.


And Bourdain eats at Cococo, the first farm-to-table restaurant in Russia where only local seasonal farmers’ goods are served.

The show’s guests shed light on the situation inside Russia while also inspiring viewers by fighting for what’s right.

Russia has taken the center stage of international news in the time since Bourdain and ZPZ filmed this episode. Bourdain briefly sums up the events including the successful winter games, the Ukrainian revolution and the annexation of Crimea.


It is truly a talent that Bourdain can chug vodka, remark a country’s food, and give viewers a better understanding of present-day Russia than any other news segment today.

“The world has done nothing. It will do nothing, as Vladimir well knew,” laments Bourdain. “He wins, again.”"


http://skift.com/2014/05/12/anthony-bourdains-parts-unknown-episode-5-inside-present-day-russia/

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Re: Death to CNN

Post  Old Mack on Fri May 23, 2014 5:25 pm

Drew GRIFFIN, CNN: I was a little caught off guard by what apparently is a disconnect between what's happening out here in the country and what the president is talking about. I hate to be curt, but this problem is real; it exists; it really doesn't have to be studied. To say that you are gonna now wait for yet again more studies to come back and more fact-finding to come back? I would think that the vets I've been talking to wanted much more direct action. I was a little confused by the president's remarks today. At the same time he was saying that he's known about this problem for years and years and years and it goes back decades, far past into other people's presidencies, and yet we're five years into his presidency and the problem seems to be certainly not better, and perhaps even worse.

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Re: Death to CNN

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