Sunjammer Solar Sailer to the Stars

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Sunjammer Solar Sailer to the Stars

Post  Yakima Canutt on Mon Jun 24, 2013 6:53 am

Some remains from Gene and Majel Barrett Roddenberry, James Doohan, and Sri Arthur C. Clarke will be heading into space.

This time, however, the ashes will travel beyond Earth’s orbit.

The remains will travel on Celestis’ Sunjammer Solar Sail Mission, which will launch from Cape Cod in November of next year. Sunjammer, named after Clarke’s similarly-named story, will be Celestis’ first launch into deep space.
The craft, utilizing a solar sail, is expected to orbit the sun between Venus and Earth, after traveling 3 million kilometers towards the sun.

The cost for launching one gram of cremated remains on Sunjammer is $12,500 per person, with a 50% discount for a second person. For $25,000, seven grams will be launched.


Last edited by Yakima Canutt on Fri Jun 13, 2014 6:52 am; edited 2 times in total

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Re: Sunjammer Solar Sailer to the Stars

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri Jul 19, 2013 2:30 pm




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Re: Sunjammer Solar Sailer to the Stars

Post  Yakima Canutt on Thu Aug 01, 2013 10:05 pm

and also the record label was lying. it was not "Small Green Men" in the band but rather Jerkwagon Lewis on pianos and Marvin Peppers on bass gui tar


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Re: Sunjammer Solar Sailer to the Stars

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Aug 13, 2013 7:54 am

a new life on Mars?
Nancy Grace Newz Service
2013

More than 100,000 people are eager to make themselves at home on another planet. They've applied for a one-way trip to Mars, hoping to be chosen to spend the rest of their short lives in uncharted territory, according to an organization planning the manned missions.

The Mars One project wants to colonize the red planet, beginning in 2022. There are financial and practical questions about this venture that haven't been clarified. Will there be enough money? Will people really be able to survive on Mars? But these haven't stopped some 30,000 Americans from signing up.

You can see some of the candidates on the project's website, but they're not the only ones who have applied, said Bas Lansdorp, Mars One CEO and co-founder.

"There is also a very large number of people who are still working on their profile, so either they have decided not to pay the application fee, or they are still making their video or they're still filling out the questionnaire or their resume. So the people that you can see online are only the ones that have finished and who have set their profiles as public," Lansdorp said.

The entrepreneur did not specify how many have paid the fees, completed their profiles and configured them as private.

Anyone 18 or older may apply, but the fee depends on a user's nationality. For Americans, it's $38; if you're in Mexico, however, it's a mere $15.


Another multicontinental group of four will be deployed two years later, according to the Mars One plan. None of them will return to Earth.

The astronauts will undergo a required eight-year training in a secluded location. According to the project site, they will learn how to repair habitat structures, grow vegetables in confined spaces and address "both routine and serious medical issues such as dental upkeep, muscle tears and bone fractures."

Food and solar panels will go in the capsules. Earth won't be sending much water or oxygen though -- those will be manufactured on Mars, Lansdorp said.

Astronauts will filter Martian water from the Martian soil. "We will evaporate it and condense it back into its liquid state," he said.

"From the water we can make hydrogen and oxygen, and we will use the oxygen for a breathing atmosphere inside the habitat. This will be prepared by the rovers autonomously before the humans arrive."

"The risks of space travel in general are already very high, so radiation is really not our biggest concern," he said.

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Re: Sunjammer Solar Sailer to the Stars

Post  Yakima Canutt on Thu Jun 12, 2014 8:12 am

1701 Digest
Tuesday

When Star Trek first hit the airwaves in 1967, one could not help but notice the show's expansive use of color. The sets, costumes and lighting all used bright, vibrant colors whenever possible. Of course the main reason for this was to get people who had just bought new high-tech color televisions to tune in, yet even in this regard, "Star Trek" was on the money.

More modern, "realistic" depictions of space tend to show spaceships bathed in primarily white metal. Everything from "2001: A Space Odyssey," "Alien," "Sunshine" and "Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope" all have ships that are white or calm in tone (although in "Star Wars" it was a dingy white to be sure).

Now those are all excellent films and considered realistic, yet in the end "Star Trek" is probably closer to the mark. In fact, no matter what version of Star Trek you're watching, from the original "Star Trek" to "Star Trek Into The Darkness," the use of color, lighting and wood is almost certainly more realistic.

Why? Well, while NASA is using sterile looking white now, that will almost certainly change for longer manned voyages into space. Study after study has shown that colors affect a human being's mood. Pink tends to calm, while red tends to excite. Brilliant, bright yellow light helps with depression, while the tactile feel and look of wood helps a user feel more connected to the machine. Colors can immediately tell a person not to touch something, or that a person is a doctor or a member of a fire team. Meaning that guys from security might just be wearing red shirts after all.

So a variety of colors, lighting and tactile feel are important for crews' physical and physiological safety on year-long-plus trips to distant worlds. After all, it'd get pretty dang dull looking at white metal walls for two years in a row.

I'd also guess that the use of analog dials, meters and switches seen on nearly every version of Star Trek would be used for the same reasons -- they are in the end simply more user friendly, both physically and mentally. So the use of multiple shades of color, curves, wood and large panels with lots of buttons seen on the bridge of Capt. Picard's Enterprise may very well be seen in the ship used for the first manned journey to Mars, and on whatever colony is established there.

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Re: Sunjammer Solar Sailer to the Stars

Post  Yakima Canutt on Thu Jun 12, 2014 8:17 am

yes, but a quribble - there isn't much in the way of "physical buttons & switches" on Picard's Enterprise-D ... seems like there's more "touchscreen" interfaces such as one would see on today's "Apple Data Padds"


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