Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  pinhedz on Wed Jun 19, 2013 11:19 pm

Well folks, I'm 'bout to go to jail all about this spoonful

Well all I want in this creation is a spoonful
That spoon, ah oh babe
You know I need my spoonful

Well every man in town is talkin' 'bout a spoonful
That spoon, ah oh babe
You know I need my spoonful

Ah these women goin' stone crazy 'bout a spoonful
[Get a better life], oh babe
You know I need my spoonful

Hey would you kill a man 'bout that spoonful
Yes I will, ah oh babe
You know I need my spoonful, yeah man

Well yonder back in Georgia down in [Riceville]
Ah that spoon, everyday
You know I need my spoonful

Well I'm goin' away to leave baby 'bout a spoonful [ya gonna leave me Larry?]
Yeah hon', ah babe
You know I need my spoonful

pinhedz
Schrödinger's Hepcat

Posts : 11694
Join date : 2011-04-11
Location : DC

http://www.balalaika.org/

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  felix on Thu Jun 20, 2013 10:15 am


felix
cool cat - mrkgnao!

Posts : 831
Join date : 2011-04-11
Location : see the chicken?

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  felix on Thu Jun 20, 2013 10:20 am

But is it a spoonful of sugar - or a spoonful of tea - or is it a spoonful of your precious love?  Hmm?

felix
cool cat - mrkgnao!

Posts : 831
Join date : 2011-04-11
Location : see the chicken?

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  pinhedz on Thu Jun 20, 2013 2:00 pm

Papa Charlie Jackson wants a really big spoonful, of I'm not sure what.scratch


pinhedz
Schrödinger's Hepcat

Posts : 11694
Join date : 2011-04-11
Location : DC

http://www.balalaika.org/

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  pinhedz on Thu Jun 20, 2013 2:14 pm

And it looks like Charley Patton had just about run out of patience, what with the slow service there in that soup joint.bounce


pinhedz
Schrödinger's Hepcat

Posts : 11694
Join date : 2011-04-11
Location : DC

http://www.balalaika.org/

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  pinhedz on Thu Jun 20, 2013 2:24 pm


pinhedz
Schrödinger's Hepcat

Posts : 11694
Join date : 2011-04-11
Location : DC

http://www.balalaika.org/

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  specialman on Thu Jun 20, 2013 9:45 pm

that Charley Patton Spoonful blues is amazing Shocked

specialman

Posts : 60
Join date : 2013-05-31

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  felix on Thu Jun 20, 2013 11:45 pm


felix
cool cat - mrkgnao!

Posts : 831
Join date : 2011-04-11
Location : see the chicken?

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  woo on Fri Jun 21, 2013 7:33 am

.


Last edited by woo on Wed Feb 25, 2015 5:31 am; edited 1 time in total

woo

Posts : 2344
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  pinhedz on Sat Jun 22, 2013 3:11 pm

Here's Charlie (Charlie might have been first ) and Larry (I heard Larry live Very Happy):




pinhedz
Schrödinger's Hepcat

Posts : 11694
Join date : 2011-04-11
Location : DC

http://www.balalaika.org/

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  specialman on Sat Jun 22, 2013 9:58 pm

felix wrote:But is it a spoonful of sugar - or a spoonful of tea - or is it a spoonful of your precious love?  Hmm?



The mind of the man who dreams is fully satisfied by what happens to him. The agonizing question of possibility is no longer pertinent. Kill, fly faster, love to your heart’s content. And if you should die, are you not certain of reawaking among the dead? Let yourself be carried along, events will not tolerate your interference. You are nameless.

specialman

Posts : 60
Join date : 2013-05-31

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  specialman on Sat Jun 22, 2013 10:05 pm

oh, what a surprise...specialman derailing something as if the correspondence was evident

specialman

Posts : 60
Join date : 2013-05-31

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  pinhedz on Sat Jun 22, 2013 11:13 pm

Charlie Patton and Larry Johnson both said they'd kill for a spoonful. Shocked

What makes it so important?  Or are they just mean ornery guys? 

pinhedz
Schrödinger's Hepcat

Posts : 11694
Join date : 2011-04-11
Location : DC

http://www.balalaika.org/

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  specialman on Sat Jun 22, 2013 11:31 pm


hey but they don't say "I would", they say "I will"...although the question is "would you?"
is that just something of the way of speaking that I don't get or it's meant as it sounds?
- that would match in accord with "the agonizing question of possibility is no longer pertinent"


Last edited by specialman on Sat Jul 06, 2013 11:03 am; edited 1 time in total

specialman

Posts : 60
Join date : 2013-05-31

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  pinhedz on Sun Jun 23, 2013 4:02 am

specialman wrote:hey but they don't say "I would", they say "I will"...although the question is "would you?"
Hmmmmmmm 

Maybe he means "I will if I have to." 
Bluesmen are known for speaking the fewest words possible--so there's more time for drinking.

pinhedz
Schrödinger's Hepcat

Posts : 11694
Join date : 2011-04-11
Location : DC

http://www.balalaika.org/

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  .... on Sun Jun 23, 2013 1:49 pm

?


Last edited by ? on Tue Nov 26, 2013 3:35 am; edited 1 time in total

....

Posts : 50
Join date : 2013-05-07

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  felix on Mon Jun 24, 2013 9:49 am

Well, Mississippi John told us he was talkin' 'bout a spoonful of Maxwell House coffee -
- and who are we to doubt Mr Hurt?

felix
cool cat - mrkgnao!

Posts : 831
Join date : 2011-04-11
Location : see the chicken?

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  pinhedz on Mon Jun 24, 2013 10:07 am

Back in an earlier time, I told my uncle Paul that I was thinking about getting a coffee maker.

He said: "Get yourself a female coffee maker."

pinhedz
Schrödinger's Hepcat

Posts : 11694
Join date : 2011-04-11
Location : DC

http://www.balalaika.org/

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  specialman on Mon Jun 24, 2013 9:19 pm

I think bluebottle knows what he meant


Last edited by specialman on Sat Jul 06, 2013 11:02 am; edited 1 time in total

specialman

Posts : 60
Join date : 2013-05-31

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Jul 02, 2013 11:46 pm

A spoonerism, of course, is a transposition, a form of malapropism. In a Time magazine essay on slips of the tongue, Roger Rosenblatt says many malapropisms are "uninteresting," but that "spoonerisms are a different fettle of kitsch."

There is some difference of opinion about what constitutes a true spoonerism. Some authorities view that a spoonerism can only involve an exchange of initial sounds (usually consonants); thus, "peas and carrots" becomes "keys and parrots." Others allow transposition of syllables ("Don't put all your Basques in one exit") or word parts ("When I throw rocks at seagulls, I leave no tern unstoned."). And others allow the transposition of entire words ("The cows sent into orbit became known as the first herd shot round the world.")

Word transpositions are very old. The French call them contrepèterie, and they date back to the 12th Century. Rabelais in 1533 wrote, "Femme folle à la Messe/Femme molle à la fesse." (The woman is crazy at Mass, she has a soft ass.)

Many people think the first English spoonerism was from the days of King Arthur, when young Lancelot couldn't afford a horse and so rode a St. Bernard and was told, "I wouldn't send a knight out on a dog like this."

In fact, the first recorded transposition in English dates to 1622: Henry Peacham (the younger) recounts, in The Complete Gentleman (a guide to good manners): "A melancholy gentleman, sitting one day at a table where I was, started up upon the sudden, and, meaning to say 'I must go buy a dagger,' by transposition of the letters, said: 'Sir, I must go dye a beggar.'"

Creating puns and word transpositions was a lively game throughout 19th-century England. Some humor historians argue that the fad began around 1854, sparked by a series of novels by Cuthburt Bede (a pseudonym for Edward Bradley) about an undergraduate at Oxford, who often uttered inadvertent reversals, such as "poke a smipe" for "smoke a pipe." The fad was especially prevalent among medical students in London, and the transpositions were known as "Medical Greek" or "Hospital Greek."

In the U.S., transpositional humor was popular in the west. Reportedly, Abraham Lincoln was fond of them. A manuscript written by Lincoln begins "He said he was riding bass-ackwards on a jass-ack through a patton-crotch." It is not clear whether Lincoln created this piece or just copied it.

However, we today describe such transpositions as "spoonerisms," named after the Reverend Dr. William Archibald Spooner (1844-1930). Spooner attended New College, Oxford, as an undergraduate in 1862, and remained there for over 60 years in various capacities, ultimately as warden (equivalent to the U.S. president of a college).

He published little of significance but was highly respected. Students and colleagues remembered him with affection, and their memoirs portray him as intelligent and wise, stern but kind, the model of the kindly Oxford don.

Julian Huxley in 1942 wrote that Spooner was "a good scholar and a good teacher" with "that rare quality which I can only describe as saintliness." In a 1970 memoir Huxley wrote, "In spite of [his eccentricities] . . . , he became a worthy and respected Warden, and successfully administered the College's affairs for many years."

Historian Arnold Toynbee said that Spooner "looked like a rabbit, but he was as brave as a lion. He was prepared at any moment to stand up to anybody, however formidable."  Yet this teacher and scholar and administrator is remembered today for his absurd bird-watching--er, word-botching.

We know that he did, certainly, make a few unintended transpositions. But the legend grew rapidly and overtook the reality, and so he is credited (blamed?) for a huge number of slips that he probably did not commit.

One of his students said, decades later, "I was always hoping to hear him utter a spoonerism, but never did."

Ironically, most of the slips that we can attribute to Spooner with certainty were not word transpositions so much as malapropisms, absent-minded blunders and inverted logic. For example:

   * He once called a famous Irish play "The Ploughboy of the Western World."
   * At dinner, he attempted to clean up spilled salt by pouring wine on it (reversal of the usual procedure.)
   * After meeting a widow, he remarked to a friend that it was very sad, "her late husband was eaten by missionaries."



Witnesses claimed they heard Spooner say, "The weight of rages will press hard upon the employer," "in a dark, glassly," and "chase the train of thought." One reasonably authentic account says that he introduced Dr. Child's friend as "Dr. Friend's child." Spooner himself admitted to only one spoonerism, announcing the hymn "Conquering Kings Their Titles Take" as "Kinkering Congs."

OK, so he made a few slips. Heck, I've taught probability classes and talked about a random toin coss.

College students in those days were as devious as they are today. Dr. Spooner's occasional transpositions created a reputation and started a fad. Students began inventing transpositional puns, and attributing them to him. Writing in 1930, one former New College student said, "We used to spend hours in inventing 'spoonerisms.'" Don Hauptman, in Cruel and Unusual Puns, says, "The craze spread like filed wire--er, wildfire." By 1885, the term "spoonerism" was widely used at Oxford, and by the turn of the century, had spread throughout England.

Dr. Spooner was credited with such blunders as:

   * "Blushing crow" for "crushing blow"
   * A well-boiled icicle" for "well-oiled bicycle."  
   * "I have in my bosom a half-warmed fish" (for half-formed wish), supposedly said in a speech to Queen Victoria
   * A toast to "our queer dean" instead of to "our dear queen."
   * Upon dropping his hat: "Will nobody pat my hiccup?"
   * At a wedding: "It is kisstomary to cuss the bride."
   * Paying a visit to a college official: "Is the bean dizzy?"
   * Addressing farmers as "ye noble tons of soil"
   * A stern reprimand to a misbehaving student: "You have hissed all my mystery lectures. You have tasted two worms. Pack up your rags and bugs, and leave immediately by the town drain!"
   * And, the classic you cited: "Mardon me padom, you are occupewing my pie. May I sew you to another sheet?"


Frankly, it seems to me that these are extremely suspicious--they are "too perfect" for accidental transpositions. Toynbee suggests, "The wittier or more elegant the specimen, the less likely it is to be authentic."

Spooner himself was quite unhappy to be so famous. One evening, a group of carousing students gathered beneath his window and loudly called for him to address them. "You don't want a speech," he answered testily. "You only want me to say one of those things."

The best (well, perhaps the only) biography is Spooner, by William Hayter (1977).

Sadly, then, we just don't know what Spooner himself said, and what was attributed to him by others. To some extent, it doesn't matter. Whether through his own blunders or the wit of his students, he has given us an art form. Julian Huxley called Spooner "a man who was the direct or indirect cause of a considerable addition to the world's stock of good-natured laughter." And that can't be all bad.

Dr. Spooner's birthday was July 22. Opporknockity doesn't tune twice! Now is the time to begin a popular movement by celebrating that momentous occasion. I myself usually celebrate with friends by emptying a beg of kier.


"Spoon head" was a speciesist slur used to describe Cardassians. It was a reference to the spoon-like oval crater on the top of Cardassian foreheads. This term was mainly used by Bajorans and Federation veterans of the Federation-Cardassian War.

Cardassian culture was hierarchical, with the State at the top in public life, and parents within the home. Cardassians value advanced age as a sign of strength, power, and wisdom. In Cardassian culture, the 30th birthday was cause for celebration for a Cardassian, though the government may not have always been so open-minded in its policies. (DS9: "The Maquis, Part I", "Distant Voices") Cardassian architecture often reinforced established hierarchy by placing important individuals in physically high locations. (DS9: "Emissary") The emphasis on hierarchy, and other factors were fertile ground for intense rivalries between individuals and families. As a result Cardassians were generally suspicious, and regarded those who were not as foolish. The irony in the Human tragedy Julius Caesar was lost on Elim Garak, who thought Caesar a fool for not suspecting that Brutus would betray him. (TNG: "Chain of Command, Part II"; DS9: "Cardassians", "Distant Voices", "Improbable Cause", "Indiscretion", "In Purgatory's Shadow", and more) Organian scientists noted that Cardassians in the 22nd century showed concern for comrades afflicted with a fatal and contagious disease - but in the end, the Cardassians killed their infected crew members. (ENT: "Observer Effect")

Cardassian culture valued family highly as shown in the Cardassian saying "Family is all." Cardassian homes were typically multi-generational and hierarchical, with male and female parents sharing authority. Cardassian culture emphasized family loyalty, whether family loyalty trumped loyalty to the state remains to be seen. Similar to some other cultures, Cardassians placed great value on the continuation of family lines, and as such were pro-natalist, though they were not known for having large numbers of offspring. Sometimes, Cardassian children would visit their parents at work to see what they did, even if their job involved torture. In contrast to the close knit family unit, Cardassian culture did not regard orphans highly, and provided no obvious means of social welfare for them, though adoption was not unheard of. (DS9: "Destiny") When making a speech, the leader of the Cardassian Union typically uses the send-off "This I vow with my life's blood, for my sons, for all our sons." (DS9: "By Inferno's Light", "Statistical Probabilities")

Neither of the two Cardassian genders is considered universally dominant over the other, though each tends to be dominant within certain specific fields within their society. Patrician Cardassian males lead a life focused on military and political service, and thus societal advances in technology and engineering have always been spearheaded by Cardassian females. Most Cardassian scientists tend to be females, or as Gilora Rejal put it, "men just don't seem to have a head for this sort of thing...that's why women dominate the sciences."(DS9: "Destiny") This does not mean that women are relegated to maintaining the Cardassian technological base, as various female ship commanders and political leaders have been observed, such as Gul Ocett and Archon Makbar.

Cardassians enjoyed debate and conversation in general. Cardassian meal time was as much about discussion as it was about eating. They would speak at length about a topic to show their knowledge, avoid saying something incriminating, or to obtain some piece of information from the person they were speaking to. Such was their love of conversation that it played a major role in their courtship. Courtship among Cardassians largely consisted of bitter, ferocious arguing, a fact not remembered by the confrontational Miles O'Brien, who engaged in repeated disputes with his female Cardassian co-worker Gilora Rejal, only to be shocked when it led to her becoming infatuated with him. (DS9: "Destiny") Pressing the palm of one's hand to another's palm was the equivalent of a kiss on the cheek, as demonstrated by Elim Garak and Tora Ziyal. (DS9: "In Purgatory's Shadow")


Yakima Canutt

Posts : 8321
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: Spoonful--an important blues subgenre

Post  Sponsored content Today at 8:44 am


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum