Who would'a thunk it?

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Who would'a thunk it?

Post  pinhedz on Sat Nov 24, 2012 3:35 pm

They tore down the local multiplex movie theater, and replaced it with something called "Angelika Film Centre and Café," which has a full bar and reserved seats. Shocked

And I guess they must have a liquor license too, because you can take your drinks into the theatre.

Nothing not to like, but who would'a think it?

pinhedz
Schrödinger's Hepcat

Posts : 11527
Join date : 2011-04-11
Location : DC

http://www.balalaika.org/

Back to top Go down

Re: Who would'a thunk it?

Post  Old Mack on Sun Jul 21, 2013 3:50 pm

I think the name is to long and probably the tab to !

Old Mack

Posts : 770
Join date : 2011-05-03
Location : Highway 61

Back to top Go down

Re: Who would'a thunk it?

Post  pinhedz on Sun Jul 21, 2013 11:29 pm

You can get a BAKED EDAMAME FALAFEL PANINI lemon tahini, pickled red onions, on wheatberry bread, with side of harissa lime yogurt for only $14.00 What a Face , which they say pairs well with their Barboursville Pinot Grigio or Banfi Rosa Regale, or--if you aren't a wine drinker--their Port City Optimal Wit.  


pinhedz
Schrödinger's Hepcat

Posts : 11527
Join date : 2011-04-11
Location : DC

http://www.balalaika.org/

Back to top Go down

Re: Who would'a thunk it?

Post  pinhedz on Mon Jul 22, 2013 4:02 am

pinhedz wrote:... Port City Optimal Wit ...
Which makes me wonder what Andy would have to say about a witbier made in Virginia. Shocked 

pinhedz
Schrödinger's Hepcat

Posts : 11527
Join date : 2011-04-11
Location : DC

http://www.balalaika.org/

Back to top Go down

Re: Who would'a thunk it?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Jul 23, 2013 3:38 am

Mónica Martínez bills her Don Bugito food truck as a "pre-Hispanic snackeria." A 36-year-old Mexican immigrant with high cheekbones and raven hair, Martínez doesn't have a chef's résumé. She studied at the Rhode Island School of Design and is, at best, a journeyman cook. Yet her fare benefits from a few authentic, and unusual, ingredients.

The San Francisco resident's tacos are built on handmade tortillas of blue corn masa, and topped with pasilla chiles and a sauce of cilantro, mint, and parsley. Then there's the traditional element that most distinguishes her food.

"The idea of Don Bugito is inspired by pre-Hispanic cuisine," Martínez says as she rolls a moist clump of masa between her hands at La Cocina, a nonprofit organization at 25th and Folsom streets that offers commercial kitchen space and business consulting to cook-entrepreneurs. "So most of the ingredients are pre-Hispanic: peppers; tomatoes; obviously, insects."

Martínez drops a handful of pallid worms, similar to those a child might feed a pet gecko, into a frying pan, where they sizzle and take on a caramel-colored sheen.

Along with crickets and meal worms, these wax moth larvae anchor the menu at Don Bugito, which debuted on Aug. 20 at the San Francisco Street Food Festival. The Mission district event was staffed by 60 vendors and attended by tens of thousands of foodies, reflecting the explosion of interest in street food in the Bay Area culinary scene.

Martínez managed to hold her own with this discerning crowd: By festival's end, she had sold all her dishes. When the food truck commences permanent operations, which she says will happen by next month, it may be the first eatery in the country devoted exclusively to preparations involving insects.

Entomophagy, or the practice of eating bugs, remains a popular culinary habit in developing countries. Residents of the Mexican state of Oaxaca are famous for their taste for chapulines, or dried grasshoppers. In Thailand, Lethocerus indicus, the giant water bug, is consumed with gusto.

But for many in Europe, or countries settled predominantly by people of European descent, the idea of eating bugs triggers a gross-out reflex. Insects and arachnids are not for eating; if anything, they are to be kept as far away from our food as possible. One of the last prominent forays that entomophagy made into American popular culture was on the television game show Fear Factor, where contestants had to prove their mettle by eating live bugs without gagging.

That might be changing. Entomophagy has long been a cultist hobby among entomologists, inspiring offbeat conferences and festivals featuring such dishes as deep-friend tarantulas and cricket jambalaya. Now a small group of cooks and activists is trying to draw a broader audience for entomophagy. Perhaps unsurprisingly, given the local history of pioneering food fads, a number of them are based in the Bay Area.

"I think it's legitimate to say right now that San Francisco is a hotbed of insect cuisine," says David Gordon, a nationally renowned entomophagist and author of The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook.

Yakima Canutt

Posts : 7842
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: Who would'a thunk it?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Jul 23, 2013 3:46 am

Before speculating on insects' prospects in the kitchen, it's not a bad idea to establish what they taste like. Daniella Martin, a San Mateo resident who runs a website devoted to insect cookery, girlmeetsbug.com, and writes about entomophagy for the Huffington Post, is a helpful authority on this subject. On a recent afternoon, she welcomed SF Weekly to her parents' home in the wooded hills between Menlo Park and Half Moon Bay to sample a bug smorgasbord.

At 34 years old, with green eyes and brown hair that falls just below her shoulders, Martin has the effusive but contained good manners of a stand-and-stir cooking-show hostess. She has worked in marketing and education administration, and discovered her passion for food insects in college while doing anthropological research in Mexico.

Martin prepares her favorite dish first: a canapé of fried wax moth larvae, diced oyster mushrooms and crème fraîche that she calls "Alice in Wonderland" because of the caterpillar and mushroom elements. Her method of preparing larvae is idiosyncratic: A cardinal rule of bug cuisine is that almost everything, even worms, should be cooked until crisp. "Most people will tell me, 'If I'm going to have an insect, it better crunch rather than gush,'" says Dave Gracer, an entomophagy advocate and food-insect supplier based in Providence, R.I.

By contrast, Martin cooks her wax worms slow and low in butter. The larvae and mushrooms blend to a virtually indistinguishable texture, color. and taste, soft and golden, their woody and earthy notes offset by the cream's silky tang. The bee larvae, fried and combined with lettuce and tomato in an entomophagist's BLT, are similar. "They taste like little, nutty, mushroomy raisins," Martin muses. This doesn't seem like eating bugs at all.

The crickets, grasshoppers, and scorpions are different. The animals' exoskeleton lends an unavoidable crunch to the dishes in which they are incorporated, reminding eaters, bite by bite, of what's in their mouths. But the texture is less jarring than the atypical flavor of the bugs' carapaces, which is not immediately appealing to the unaccustomed palate.

The exoskeletons have an iodine aftertaste redolent of the naturalist's laboratory. Yet when combined with other familiar flavors — Martin serves up a grasshopper on a slice of apple drizzled with honey — the taste of any bug recedes into the background. Like shrimp, crabs, and lobsters, insects impart a flavor that is mild and easily combined with other ingredients.

The comparison with ocean- and river-dwelling arthropods is one that often comes up in conversation with entomophagists. The animals share similar physical traits and belong to the same phylum. Some insects will even trigger shellfish allergies. "You have to scratch your head, from a logical perspective," says Zack Lemann, chief entomologist at the Audubon Insectarium in New Orleans. "Why do we eat shrimp and crawfish but not their brethren on land?"

Lemann's facility, which opened in 2008, includes an interactive exhibit in the form of a cafe called "Bug Appetit."


Yakima Canutt

Posts : 7842
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: Who would'a thunk it?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Jul 23, 2013 3:47 am

In an age of growing consumer obsession with ethical and sustainable food sources, they argue that bugs are about the most ecologically sound food there is.

The environmental benefits of turning to bugs as food are most apparent, entomophagists maintain, when the nutritional benefits and environmental costs of insect gathering and farming are considered side by side with those of large-animal husbandry.

Cows are an inefficient means of converting grasses or grains into protein, consuming at least 10 pounds of silage for every two pounds of meat they produce. Insects, by contrast, are among nature's most efficient feed converters. The same 10 pounds of plant matter will support roughly seven or eight pounds of crickets, according to Frank Franklin, a retired pediatric gastroenterologist and nutritionist who teaches at the School of Public Health at the University of Alabama. Insects don't emit ozone-depleting methane gas, and consume a low volume of water, compared to large mammals.

Bug farms also seem to obviate some of the ethical and environmental problems that plague industrial agriculture. There's nothing wrong with keeping many insects together in close quarters. Despite Western associations between insects and filth, many food bugs have exceedingly pure vegetarian diets — wax moth larvae, for instance, can subsist on nothing but bran and honey. Contrasted with the diets of say, farm hogs or ocean-dwelling crustaceans, that starts to look pretty good. "I like to point out that lobsters and crabs eat trash and feces and dead animals, and grasshoppers eat salad," Gracer says.

Yakima Canutt

Posts : 7842
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: Who would'a thunk it?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Wed Jul 24, 2013 5:13 pm

Jay-Z’s upbeat interview with The Breakfast Club morning show on New York's Power 105.1 turned awkward Wednesday when Robert De Niro was mentioned.

The Magna Carta Holy Grail rapper responded, “No, I haven’t,” when asked if he ever returned the phone calls from the 'The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle' actor.

Last November, the New Post reported that De Niro confronted Jay-Z for not calling him back after six attempts to make contact.


When the Power 105.1 personalities probed, asking Jay how could anyone shrug off De Niro, Jay implied that there was an issue of mutual respect.

“I treat people based on who they are, who they really are, like not the name, not Robert De Niro. Who you are as a person,” Jay said.

He continued, “Everyone has to be respectful, and everyone has to be a human being and no one’s above. We all [are] human beings, and we all have to be respectful to one another and that’s just the end of it and just how I carry it with anybody.”

Yakima Canutt

Posts : 7842
Join date : 2011-04-11

Back to top Go down

Re: Who would'a thunk it?

Post  Sponsored content Today at 1:00 pm


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum