How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

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How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sat Feb 18, 2012 1:19 pm

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Through music, scripture and song, Don Cornelius was remembered Thursday as the man who elevated black culture and entertainment with his "Soul Train," demolishing barriers of race and culture, and changing American history.

Hundreds of family, friends, entertainers, sports figures and even some former "Soul Train" dancers gathered to honor Cornelius' legacy and recall their recollections of the baritone-voiced host and entrepreneur. The nearly three-hour memorial service featured plenty of laughter and music, including a rousing performance of "Love's In Need of Love" by Stevie Wonder.

Civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson delivered a eulogy that centered on how Cornelius' creation created a platform for black music and culture that hadn't been seen on television when "Soul Train" debuted in 1970. "Soul Train" was broadcast nationally from 1971 to 2006 and became one of television's longest running syndicated shows. He gave up hosting duties in 1993.

"Don, we say thanks for being conductor of the 'Soul Train' and laying the tracks," Jackson said. "We thank you because we needed you so badly and you helped us so much."



Several speakers noted that Cornelius didn't just give a platform to performers such as Wonder, Aretha Franklin and the Jackson 5, but he also gave opportunities to black cameramen and demonstrated that television programming aimed at black audiences was viable.

At several points during the service, photos of Cornelius on the show's set were displayed for the gathering, which ended with clips of the popular host dancing and delivering his signature sign-off, "Love, Peace and Soul!!!"

Smokey Robinson joked that Cornelius would often ask guests questions that veered away from their music, such as what they were driving and when they'd last eaten at a particular restaurant.

Pastor Donnie McClurkin, who led the service, noted that his mother didn't allow her children to listen to popular music. But when she went grocery shopping on Saturdays, he and his siblings caught up on all the latest dance moves and music by watching "Soul Train."

Cornelius was born in September 1936 in Chicago, served as a Marine in Korea and worked various jobs before getting into broadcasting in the mid-1960s.

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sun Feb 19, 2012 9:41 pm


The LAPD captain who ran the crime scene on the day Don Cornelius killed himself was no stranger to the legendary TV host ... because in her younger days, she appeared on "Soul Train" ... Starfucker Daily has learned.

Captain Tia Monett Morris joined the Los Angeles Police Department back in 1981. But before she was solving crimes, Capt. Morris appeared on "Soul Train" as a dancer back when she was a teenager.

We called Capt. Morris for details about her time on the show -- but she was tightlipped, only confirming she had indeed appeared on the show.

10-4, captain.

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  usero on Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:47 pm

user wrote:

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  felix on Mon Feb 25, 2013 8:54 am




rendeer santa cherry albino sunny albino cherry santa rendeer santa cherry albino sunny albino cherry santa rendeer santa cherry albino sunny albino cherry santa rendeer santa cherry albino sunny

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Feb 26, 2013 3:27 pm


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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  pinhedz on Thu Feb 28, 2013 2:32 pm

There's was a really big and festive celebration today. cheers


African & Carribbean Cuisine: 11:00 am -- 2:00 pm. Very Happy
Hot Fudge Cake a la mode--Chocolatey Caramel Goody Goodness: 12:30 pm -- 2:30 pm

[NOT MAKING THIS UP]

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Wed Aug 14, 2013 8:26 pm


monkey monkey monkey 

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  e.g. on Fri Aug 16, 2013 10:18 pm

ye gods, could it be tis black shark history month al-freakin-ready?  did i fo reel just squandre another year of me holo-life? scratch 


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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sat Aug 17, 2013 4:43 am

Dave Chappelle offers some advice to Young Black Sharks:

"The only way to get out of the ghetto is to focus and stop blaming white people ... ... and you’ve got to learn how to rap or play basketball or something. Or sell crack.”

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  pinhedz on Sat Aug 17, 2013 7:44 am

I thought I'd go see Oprah's movie. afro 

I know it will trash Nixon, but i'm curious about how Ike and Ron will come out.

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Aug 20, 2013 3:03 pm

The 3 Soul Classes of Black Amreica expressed in their cine-auteurs:

Tyler Perry - trash
Lee Daniels - M.O.R. ( but in yo face)
Spike Lee - pretentious

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri Aug 23, 2013 7:09 am

this NAFTA certified duty-free annotated Daily Palindrome Calendar says today is, Uwe guessed it- African-American Computer Skills Awareness Day. Hegh, think before you sink ... or the deferred dream could possibly crust/sugar over like a syrupy sweet, sag or maybe even explode, rite


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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  pinhedz on Mon Aug 26, 2013 8:24 am

user wrote:The 3 Soul Classes of Black Amreica expressed in their cine-auteurs:

Tyler Perry - trash
Lee Daniels - M.O.R. ( but in yo face)
Spike Lee - pretentious
I just saw the fictional story about the true story.

I couldn't tell who Robin Williams was playing.

Liev Schreiber was not bad as Lyndon, but he's too short.

Kennedy looked a bit like Bobby.

John Cusack was trying to play some psycho that I could not identify.

Ivan Reitman and Jane Fonda where not bad as Ronnie and Nancy.






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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  pinhedz on Mon Aug 26, 2013 9:20 am

... and, I also wanted to say that the Angela Davis wannabe should get the job:


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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  pinhedz on Mon Aug 26, 2013 10:39 am

For a peek at the real butler, here he is eavesdropping on Ike, who is in a huddle with the leaders of the black community:




Here we see the butler using his brilliant comedic timing to crack up the guests at the Fords' tea party:




And here is a rare photo of the butler serving President McCain:


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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  pinhedz on Mon Sep 02, 2013 10:17 am

The paper says the movie did wrong by Reagan--the real butler did not quit because Reagan had invited him to a banquet and he felt "used."

The real butler had a jolly good time at the banquet. bounce

The butler really quit because he was past retirement age and ready to start getting a pension.   

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  pinhedz on Tue Sep 03, 2013 2:36 pm

There was just a bit of a dust-up at the place over an author that the liberals there are calling a despicable racist, ignoramus and anti-intellectual.

[They might not have found out yet that he's a black professor at Berkley]

Anyway, here's a sampling:

Forbes 12/30/2008

Racism In America Is Over


The question someone like me has been asked to answer several times a week since Nov. 5 has been, “Are we now in a post-racial America?”

Giving an answer requires that we know what the question really refers to: whether America is past racism. Moreover, the point is largely racism against black people, i.e., Barack Obama, i.e., the people who are America’s eternal shame, and so on. We are not really thinking about racism against Arabs. Most of us have a sense that the Asian pitching in on how the question applies to her is vaguely beside the point.

So, in answer to the question, “Is America past racism against black people,” I say the answer is yes.

Of course, nothing magically changed when Obama was declared president-elect. However, our proper concern is not whether racism still exists, but whether it remains a serious problem. The election of Obama proved, as nothing else could have, that it no longer does.

I make that claim while quite sure that in 2009, a noose or three will be hung somewhere, some employer will be revealed to have used the N-word on tapes of a meeting, and so on. America will remain imperfect, as humans have always been.

It’s not an accident, however, that increasingly, alleged cases of racism are tough calls, reflecting the complexity of human affairs rather than the stark injustice of Jim Crow or even redlining. A young black man is shot dead by three police officers and only one of them is white. A white radio host uses a jocular slur against black women–used for decades in the exact same way by black rappers celebrated as bards.

The issue, then, is degree. When it comes to racism, too many suddenly think in the binary fashion of the quantum physicist: either there is no racism or there “is” racism, which, no matter its nature or extent, indicts America as a land with bigotry in its warp and woof.

But anyone who wants to take this line from now on will have to grapple with the elephant in the middle of the room: the president of AmeriKKKa is black. If the racism that America is “all about” is the kind that allows a black man to become president, then I’m afraid the nature of this “all about” is too abstract for me to follow, and most Americans will feel similarly. It’s time to change the discussion.

As such, all of the AmeriKKKa-type rhetoric is now performance. Acts of racism should be condemned, of course. However, the gesture of claiming that each such thing should “remind us” of the dirty secret of what America is “still all about” now qualifies as a superstition, like hanging garlic in a doorway. That is, the 2005 movie Crash, in which prejudiced Angelenos take out their grievances on one another, was a melodrama, not a reflection of The Real America.

Important: Those who come away from this piece thinking I am writing about Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton might as well have read the back of a soup can. Recreational potshots against celebrity preachers are just that, and the influence of those two on how black people think has been long overrated.

I refer, rather, to millions of Americans of all colors who think of racism as a hot topic at all. Journalists, academics, community leaders, concerned citizens, NPR listeners–all must break the habit of supposing it is our moral duty to keep racism front and center in discussions about how to help disadvantaged black people. Because in 2009, that’s all it is–a habit.

The gulf is vaster by the year between the aforementioned crowd’s sense of racism’s role in black people’s lives and the reality of the problems black people actually face. The uptick in black-on-black homicides over the past decade, for example, is grievous.

However, the young men are not shooting each other because white people don’t like them. OK, one might fashion an involved, subtle argument as to how when a 15-year-old in Brooklyn shoots another one in the face, it is traceable to racism–likely “societal” or “institutional.”

However, there are two problems with this line of reasoning. First, arguments like these are too arcane to unite the nation behind some kind of relief effort. People being hosed to the ground in Birmingham was one thing. But what would the “anti-racist” plan be now? How do you “eliminate racism” of the kind that sparked a chain reaction that led to that 15-year-old having and using that gun?

Second, think about it: Even if you could wave a magic wand and eliminate this “racism” today, the murders we are dealing with would continue.

In the same way, how is the AIDS crisis in black America due to racism–i.e., in a way such that we could eliminate that racism and see AIDS disappear? Millions of black schoolchildren never learn to read well because teachers’ unions have no interest in the phonics-based, drill-focused program called Project Follow Through that has been proven since the ’60s to teach poor kids to read well. The role of racism in this is decidedly obscure.

A generous way of describing this, as Richard Thompson Ford put it in the best 2008 book on race, The Race Card, is “racism without racists.” In many of these cases, racism was the spark in the past (i.e. white flight in 1969), but is no longer the problem in the present (the way to keep teens from shooting each other is not to ask whites to come live in black ghettos in 2009).

Yet is that really so obscure a point? That Ford had to carefully compose a whole book presenting it as a symptom of the suspension of disbelief that thinking Americans have long learned when it comes to “racism”: that black problems must always, somehow–and no matter how counterintuitive it may seem–be due to something for which white people are responsible.

The latest expression of that way of thinking was the widespread conviction that open racists were still so common, determined and powerful in America that color could keep even a rock star phenomenon like Barack Obama from being elected president. Indeed, it is precisely the sentiments of these shadowy racists that get people so worried when a black writer like me says racism is no longer worth our extended attention. I am supposedly enabling something that is ever poised to have, well, some kind of effect.

But with Obama’s election we saw that one thing these backward people cannot stop is a black family ending up in the White House. And really, what else were we worried about them affecting? Wasn’t it mostly their effect on elections? Surely we do not care how such people feel about black people, just in and of itself? I don’t, and I can do without a white person worrying for me about how bohunks feel about me. I doubt my feelings are unusual.

So, if I have to give a single answer, it is, yes, we can call ourselves a post-racial country. W.E.B. DuBois was correct that “the problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color-line”–or at least it was for most of that century. In this 21st one, however, the color line is not the problem in any sense we can honestly consider logical, useful or even compassionate.

We must stop pretending otherwise, partly because we end up embracing weakness. When decrying racism opens no door and teaches no skill, it becomes a schoolroom tattletale affair. It is unworthy of all of us: “He’s just a racist” intoned like “nyah nyah nyah nyah nyah!”

More important, however, is that we waste time and energy more usefully directed to actually helping people. There are few things more grim than spending the afternoon at a panel discussion on programs assisting (black) ex-cons to get on their feet and keep jobs, only to find that the big news on race that evening is people being studiously offended that someone on Fox News made a joke about Barack Obama’s “baby mama.”

Obama himself has urged us to think larger than this. We are poised at a moment when legions are considering how to make life better for the less fortunate, how to make the damaged nation a better place, living up to the ideals it was founded upon.

It would be a tragedy if any more than a few professional hotheads took this as an opportunity to continue obsessing over racism, rather than conceiving of ways to help the poor. Many suppose the two are the same, and it is precisely that idea that is outdated.

The point is valid even when the terminology is “societal racism,” “institutional racism” or “white privilege.” Obsessing over things that cannot be changed and are not the real problem anyway is of no use to anyone. Doctoral theses carefully teasing out the role of “racism” in this phenomenon or that one will seem about as useful to posterity as the scribings of an alchemist.

There are white and black people whose brains, if submitted to an EEG, would light up most brightly at the mention of the word “racism” (and dim quickly at the mention of the word “policy paper”). I designate 2009 as the first year in which people like this, insisting that racism is black America’s most urgent problem–or even one of black America’s most urgent problems–are no longer worthy of extended engagement.

Yes, I mean it. This is a time when we can afford to let the past be the past. Obama’s election showed us that we can, and his call for action requires that we do.

John McWhorter is the author, most recently, of Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue, and has taught linguistics at Cornell and the University of California, Berkeley. He is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute.

Forbes 1/20/2009

Obama And The Black Elite


I noticed something about our moment Monday when I was on “Talk of the Nation” on NPR. I was there as the usual “con” person on affirmative action. (Not that con–I just think it should be about class rather than race.) But the “pro” who was on with me trotted out the line that racial preferences are crucial in university admissions because they allow black students to make connections critical to succeeding in later life.

Generally I respond to this by noting how few prosperous, famous blacks went to Ivy League schools. It’s a fact: Not Oprah, not Spike Lee, not Richard Parsons.

Yet it occurred to me that these days we have been paying especial attention to successful black people who did happen to go to Ivy schools. Now, when people do the “connections” rant, they have a new crop of black celebrities to refer to. It’s a more powerful rhetorical move than it was back in the day.

It’s not just the Obamas but the “Obama people”–the couple’s circle of associates–whose current prominence, I suspect, will render obsolete the amazement of so many that there exists a robust “black bourgeoisie.” (Recall the surprise among the commentariat when Stephen Carter’s book The Emperor of Ocean Park came out some years ago.)

As it happens, I watched Barack Obama sworn in at a New York party of black people of the Obama-people sort: Harvard Business School grads, their consorts and a scattering of stars. It was an interesting slice-of-life afternoon against the backdrop of what was happening in Washington on the big high-def screens.

The point of this event was for an interviewer to sound out myself and Amiri Baraka (yes, him, and I am not really sure just why) on the Inauguration and the Prospects For The Future. Baraka, smart as a whip and quite funny, sounded off with a long list of Marxist prescriptions with no hope of bearing fruit. Whether he really thinks calls to nationalize our banks are serious advice I genuinely do not know; more interesting was the way he could get an audience of more pragmatically minded blacks applauding now and then.

It was what Peggy Noonan parsed last May as harmlessly “summoning the old anger,” then in reference to perfectly normal black burghers like the Obamas clapping at sermons by firebrands like Jeremiah Wright. Almost no one in the room agreed with Baraka’s counsel, but there was something to just hearing the old man lay it out. Talk about a double consciousness.

Meanwhile, the Hayden Planetarium’s Neil DeGrasse Tyson, a leading and celebrity astrophysicist who happens to be black, paralleled Obama’s quest to seem to “happen to be black.” Neil argued, with great (as Kennedy used to say) “vi-gah,” that it’s idle for black thinkers like Baraka to decry the outsourcing of manufacturing jobs overseas, since we need to stress technological innovation such that there will always be something new to manufacture here.

Very Tom Friedman and very sensible, but Neil is so much his own man–so, dare I say it, post-racial (although he isn’t really, and knows it)–that he was neglecting a tacit rule in a setting like this one: that we were to keep front and center the humble black person who loses his or her job when the factory moves away. That is, what if technological innovation weren’t happening fast enough to give someone like Michelle Obama’s father, who supported his family as a pump operator, a new job if he were laid off? With Baraka and Tyson on either side of me I felt like I was sandwiched between the black past and present.

Some things about the black past are strangely enticing. Historian David Levering Lewis, who happens-to-be-black and is the author of the magisterial double-volume biography of W.E.B. DuBois and so much else, was present. As we talked, three things struck me.

First, it turns out he was friends with my mother at Fisk University in the ’50s. Second, he used the word celerity in conversation. Third, however, was that a black man this erudite, with speech so utterly not “black” in any way, with his light skin, was never told he was “acting white.”

Obama in his 2004 Democratic Convention speech decried “the slander that says that if a black youth walks around with a book in his hand, he is acting white.” But the Black America Lewis went to college in knew no such thing. It only started in the late ’60s as a defense response amid desegregation of schools, when white kids at first were not exactly welcoming to new black ones.

Until then it was whites who made fun of blacks for learning. Baraka told me of the time he, a northern black boy, visited the South, read a sign for Lucky Strike cigarettes out loud in a store, and was told menacingly by a white man, “Some folks talk too plain.” That is, black people aren’t supposed to step out of their place.

Today, black kids have, sadly, taken that surly white Southerner’s place–although likely, Obama’s example will start cutting through it. Maybe he has a head-start with black people younger than me. On the way into Manhattan I was reading a Russian magazine I keep up with in order not to lose my reading knowledge of a language I worked so hard to learn. But I felt funny about walking into this gathering with it–so unconnected to what the event was about. So, yes, “not black.”

Not that I thought anyone would have a problem with it, but a voice deep down, one not even conscious, told me to tuck it into my coat pocket. Talk about the old anger–or, for me, the old wariness. I thought it might look pretentious, when all it is is a hobby. I grew up watching black kids being hazed for liking school.

But on my way out a 20-something young woman gathering her coat also had a book–by antique white writer William Dean Howells–and clearly had no problem with that being visible to anyone who happened to notice, though in no way considering it something to show around.

I guess she was more comfortable with herself than I am in some ways, poised between Amiri Baraka and Neil DeGrasse Tyson and finding myself tsk-tsking Neil on insensitivity to what we might call “black concerns.”

On the way home to get to my laptop and write editorials, as we commentators were all doing in the late afternoon after the festivities were over, I did not open up my Russian magazine. Instead, I was thinking about how so much of the purpose of parties like the one I had been at, the eternal question mark as to how far we can expect black America to go, had been resolved at 11:30 that morning.

Are we free at last? Well, given that people of no color are truly free in America or anywhere else, I think we can say black Americans, problems acknowledged, are pretty close. So “some folks talk too plain?” Well, Obama sure talks plain in his way, and in 2009, no one white or black tells him not to. And most of us think he talks just right.




Wall Street Journal August 27, 2013
A Better Way to Honor Dr. King's Dream
The goal of the civil-rights movement was opportunity—not a 'post-racial' society..

On the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, we will hear a good deal about how life in this country for black Americans has not changed as much as Martin Luther King Jr. might have wished. We will hear little to nothing about the role that certain strains of black progressive ideology have played in delaying the realization of King's dream.

"It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment and to underestimate the determination of the Negro," King announced from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on Aug. 28, 1963. He was right, and America knew it. The following year, segregation was outlawed with the Civil Rights Act. The year after, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act into law.

It is easy to forget what an awesome moral landmark it was for an oppressed group to force the larger society to outlaw barriers to its success. But the victory of the 1964 and 1965 laws had an even greater impact than prohibiting segregation and racial discrimination in voter registration: It changed the culture. Personal racist sentiment rapidly became socially proscribed. The Norman Lear sitcoms of the early 1970s, in which bigoted whites were regularly held up to ridicule, would have been unthinkable just 10 years before.

But "the struggle," as civil-rights veterans term the fight against racial discrimination, was hardly over. Practices and attitudes change slowly. As a black man, I can attest that as late as 1986 I was transparently denied a summer job at a restaurant in New Jersey simply because of my skin color.

However, in the decades since the March on Washington, black America has been taken on a detour by too many self-described progressive black thinkers and leaders, whose quixotic psycho-social experiment they disguise as a continuation of the civil-rights movement. With segregation illegal and public racism considered a moral outrage, we black Americans are now told that we will not truly overcome until Americans don't even harbor private racist sentiment, until race plays not even a subtle role in America's social fabric.

In other words, our current battle is no longer against segregation or bigotry but "racism" of the kind that can be revealed only by psychological experiments and statistical studies.

This battle is as futile as seeking a world without germs. "We have come to the nation's capital to cash a check," King said. But the preacher was talking about being freed from "the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination"—not asking whether Americans are aware of skin color or are more likely to associate black faces with negative words in an experiment.

Along these lines, the term "institutional racism," which the Black Power movement injected into the lexicon in the late 1960s, is more damaging to the black psyche than the n-word or any crude jokes about plantations or food stamps. The term encourages blacks to think of society—in which inequality, while real, is complex and faceless—as actively and reprehensibly racist in the same way that Archie Bunker was. The result is visceral bitterness toward something that can't feel or think.

Equally distracting is the notion that America needs a "conversation" about race, one in which whites submit to a lesson from blacks about so-called institutional racism. "Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening," King told us in his speech. What we awaken to now is the rudeness of idle talk, of those who blow off steam by demanding a "conversation" that will not bear fruit—look no further than President Clinton's national effort on that front in the late 1990s—and in any case wouldn't provide greater opportunity to any poor person.

The "conversation" idea is fundamentally passive because it assumes that what black people need most is for white people to think better of them and more about them. So why does it command such allegiance among blacks? Because it channels the idea that our most urgent task is to speak truth to power, rather than to help black people who need it. Too many suppose that the two tasks are still the same as they were in 1963, when the reality is now quite different.

The "conversation" illusion is also why black America is more disturbed by whites killing blacks than by blacks killing blacks. Commentators who claim that black leaders ignore black-on-black crime miss the fact that black communities have long organized Stop the Violence forums to get citizens involved in stopping crime in their neighborhoods. Yet many black people are indeed angrier at one George Zimmerman for killing Trayvon Martin than at the thousands of black boys who murder one another year after year. This is because we have been taught that our main task is uncovering racism rather than concretely addressing the things that make life hardest for the most blacks.

Today's struggle should focus on three priorities. First, the war on drugs, a policy that unnecessarily tears apart black families and neighborhoods. Second, community colleges and vocational education, which are invaluable in helping black Americans get ahead. And third, the AIDS and obesity epidemics, which are ravaging black communities.

The only reason why ideas like "institutional racism" and "a conversation about race" seem more compelling is because they are more morally dramatic. Drama is not what will make a difference in black lives.

"We will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream," King said. But if justice is an America without racism of any kind, then we will never be satisfied.

Too many blacks seem to have internalized just that: The essence of contemporary blackness in America is eternal indignation. Notice, for example, the fire-breathing hostility that against-the-grain black writers attract from other blacks. As I know from personal experience, these writers are accused of tempting whites into some kind of antiblack backlash.

Instead, in recent years, the black middle class has flourished. Housing segregation for blacks is the lowest it has been since the 1920s. And a black president has been elected twice. Yet the fury persists, since what actually rankles these critics is the threat to what they feel is their very identity: underdogs with a bone to pick.

This is not where the March on Washington was pointing us. There is work left, but we are free at last. No, we aren't living in a "post-racial" America, but that fantasy will never be realized. What we black Americans are free to do, in a permanently imperfect world, is shape our own destiny together.

In 2013, how white people feel about us has nothing to do with that task. Only by facing that reality will we truly honor the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  pinhedz on Tue Sep 03, 2013 2:39 pm

Note what McWhorter names as the top three priorities that today's struggle should focus on:

-- First, the war on drugs, a policy that unnecessarily tears apart black families and neighborhoods.

-- Second, community colleges and vocational education, which are invaluable in helping black Americans get ahead.

-- Third, the AIDS and obesity epidemics, which are ravaging black communities.

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  pinhedz on Thu Sep 05, 2013 2:04 pm

This was over at the other place (btw, it's really nasty over there, so I think I'll let them stew in their own juice until further notice  ):

smoke wrote:I would like to consider these ideas separately from the fact that white racists will thrillingly take them up as proof that "the blacks" should stop complaining and get a job...that is not McWhorter's fault.  
This is always the risk when a black author raises these issues before the general public.

And it makes me wonder--since he mostly writes about what black people can do on their own--does he even want white readers?

At worst, the effect is exactly as you say.  At best, white folks might stop beating their breasts quite so hard, but neither effect is particularly helpful for the black community.

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  pinhedz on Fri Sep 06, 2013 4:38 am

The pinhed is never sure who's here and who isn't--but I think onetwomany is here.  Yes?

A culture of victimization has engulfed black (and liberal white) America and prevented it from seeing or discussing more important issues.
Of course, if McWhorter's call really is just to the black community, then white-liberal angst is irrelevant.

But it's still here, unchanged since it stabilized and froze in a fixed pose back in the 1980s.  

Becoming set in one's ways is both a danger and a comfort:


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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Mon Oct 07, 2013 10:04 pm

Cel-e-brate Wood Mimes, come on, let us go ; tut tut Astro-Zeneca π†Ω  π†Ωπ†Ωπ†Ωπ†Ωπ†Ωπ†Ωπ†Ωπ†Ωπ†Ωπ†Ωπ†Ωπ†Ωπ†Ωπ†Ωπ†Ω

monkey monkey monkey monkey farao monkey monkey monkey monkey afro monkeymonkeymonkeymonkeyfaraomonkeymonkeymonkeymonkey

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Nov 12, 2013 8:48 pm

afro monkey afro monkeyafromonkeyafromonkeyafromonkeyafromonkey
afro monkeyafromonkeyafromonkeyafromonkeyafromonkeyafromonkey


scratch 

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Mon Dec 16, 2013 5:07 am



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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  pinhedz on Mon Dec 16, 2013 12:41 pm

LeVar Burton--wasn't he in Roots?

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

Post  Yakima Canutt on Wed Dec 18, 2013 8:31 am

yessuh

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Re: How are you celebrating the invention of Black History Month?

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