John Cassavetes

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John Cassavetes

Post  Guest on Sat Feb 11, 2012 12:27 am

First thing I have to say

RIP Ben Gazzara
(he died on February the 3rd)



Last edited by Vera Cruz on Sat Feb 11, 2012 12:35 am; edited 1 time in total

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Re: John Cassavetes

Post  Guest on Sat Feb 11, 2012 12:33 am

February 7, 2012
Gazzara on Cassavetes
Posted by Richard Brody

(http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/movies/2012/02/gazzara-on-cassavetes.html#ixzz1lzA7zxbn)



At his Cinoque blog on the Libération site, Edouard Waintrop reissues an interview that he did with Ben Gazzara in 1995 at a film festival in the Southern town of Alès, in which the actor’s collaborations with John Cassavetes were on the agenda. It’s a good and substantial interview, in which Gazzara explains that Cassavetes essentially rescued him from the TV series “Run for Your Life” (“I was doing episode after episode, one more predictable than the other. Routine, boredom, factory work, for three years”)—adding, about the film “Husbands,” “It saved my life.” What he said about their next film together, “The Killing of a Chinese Bookie,” gets to the core of the matter:

"That was more difficult. I didn’t really understand where John was going with it. I didn’t see right away that the film was a metaphor that meant a lot to him. That these gangsters (Timothy Carey, Seymour Cassel) represented everything that comes along that interferes with, disturbs creativity, the sensibility of an artist; that the film talks about the price to be paid for following your dreams to the end. When I understood this, I took great pleasure in acting in the film, which is less directly accessible than “Husbands.” "

It’s a fascinating revelation. “The Killing of a Chinese Bookie” seems, on the surface, to be more directly accessible than “Husbands,” because it’s a traditional and familiar kind of crime story. But what Gazzara describes as the experience of acting in it matches my own experience of viewing it. (I wrote about it in the magazine when it came out on DVD in 2008, calling it an “allegory.”) One of the things that comes through in the film is the agony of confrontation with the powerful—an inevitable aspect of the film business, or of any business, but one that must have left scars on the soul of even as fiercely driven an artist as Cassavetes was. (To what extent was his self-destructive behavior intensified by his battles—which, in turn, it embittered?)

Near the end of Cassavetes’s life, he had a new project for Gazzara and Peter Falk, “Begin the Beguine,” which Gazzara describes as “very funny,” adding, “He had Peter and me rehearse, he filmed the rehearsals; for that matter, I’d really like to see those images.” Wouldn’t we all. I wonder how many projects, such as “Begin the Beguine,” were left in the lurch with audiovisual material remaining to be discovered. (Ray Carney, in “Cassavetes on Cassavetes,” says, “He made many audio- and videotape recordings of readings and scenes that interested him—including one of Falk and Gazzara in ‘Begin the Beguine.’ ”) The vagaries of DVD distribution are keeping some of his greatest films largely out of sight—“Love Streams,” “Minnie and Moskowitz” (though they’re all essential viewing; at this level of creation, it’s like ranking Beethoven sonatas)—and the two early-sixties studio films he made, “Too Late Blues” and “A Child Is Waiting.” But Carney reports that Cassavetes turned down a lucrative home-video offer:

"You think I want to be popular? You think I want them out on video? I want millions of people to see my movies? Why would I?"

A Greek-American Kafka. Nonetheless, the video-business Max Brods who bring them out are to be commended, honored—and encouraged. If some further justification were needed, the preservation and transmission of the artistry and humanity of his actors, with Gazzara in the front line, would suffice.

Read more http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/movies/2012/02/gazzara-on-cassavetes.html#ixzz1lzAQXNEM

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Re: John Cassavetes

Post  Guest on Sat Feb 11, 2012 12:38 am

Trailer for Opening Night


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Re: John Cassavetes

Post  Guest on Sat Feb 11, 2012 12:49 am


Gena Rowlands, John Cassavetes and Peter Falk

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Re: John Cassavetes

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sat Feb 18, 2012 9:29 pm



Dead at 81
The Wool Stream Journal
February 29, 2012


Longtime family friend Suzanne said he died Friday in Man-hatton after being placed in hospice care for the cancer.

In 1955 he ORIGINATED the role of Brick Pollitt, the disturbed alcoholic son and failed football star. As Robert Trout or Roger Mudd has observed during holi-day in La Jolla, the original can be.. still... the gratest.

He left the show after seven months to take on an equally challenging role... Johnny Pope, heartsmasher and drug addict at large... in a little theatrical dynamo known as "A Hat-ful of Rain (Defy or Death Sigh)" which premiered at the known The Milk Factory Act-House on Tweed Street.

He made his photoplay debut in 1957 in "The Strange One," Calder Willingham's bitter drama about brutality at a Southern military school. He had previously played the lead role of the psychopathic cadet, Jocko de Paris, on Broadway in Mr. Willingham's stage version of the story, "End of Man."

He grew up on the Lower East Side of Man-hatton in a cold-water flat with a bathtub in the kitchen. His parents were immigrants from Sicily who met and married in New York, and his first language was !Italiano! Although he was baptized under his birth name, his parents always called him Ben or Benny.

As a child he became fascinated with "movies," and after giving his first performance, in a Boys Club play, he knew he had found his life's work.



"I disliked high school," he once said, "and after two years of it I left without telling anyone at home."

Instead he spent his days in nickelodeons and moving picture venues.

He entered Erwin Piscator's Dramatic Workshop in 1948. Eighteen months later he auditioned for the Actors Studio run by Lee Strasbergs and was accepted.

"There's a lot of voodoo about the Actors Studio," he told the news service.

His first two marriages, to actresses Louise Erikson and Janice Crule, ended in divorce.

While filming "Inchon" in Korea in 1981, he met Ms. Krivat. They married the following year, and the union endured.

"Elke saved my life. When I met her, I was drinking too much, fooling around too much, killing myself. She put romance and hope back in my life."


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Re: John Cassavetes

Post  glue moon on Mon Sep 23, 2013 10:27 am


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Re: John Cassavetes

Post  pinhedz on Mon Sep 23, 2013 10:40 am


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Re: John Cassavetes

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri Oct 04, 2013 3:44 pm

ahh wee, the original template, iterated in such times as the Dave Letterman-Joaquin Phoenix battle avec royale etc.




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Re: John Cassavetes

Post  Yakima Canutt on Fri Oct 04, 2013 6:11 pm



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