Australian ATU'ers

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Re: Australian ATU'ers

Post  tatiana on Fri Feb 03, 2012 3:33 pm

Nah Ville Sky Chick wrote:How did you get there, do you know?

I have just started reading The Fatal Shore and it occured to me that I had never asked any of you?

Are you recent arrivals, if not, when did your people arrive and where were they from?

Suspect




hi nash,


serious answer
my mum has scottish heritage, i think....way back, she was born locally
and my dad is a dutchman.....he came to australia as a young child, might have been during a war.




my cheeky answer
out of my mums belly, just like everyone else....Nash, don't you remember that kind of stuff? Wink

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Re: Australian ATU'ers

Post  Doc Watson on Fri Feb 03, 2012 11:20 pm

blue moon wrote:...Mum's parents came over as 'ten-pound poms' in about 1909 or thereabouts, from Liverpool / Manchester.
I'm not sure where Dad's side of the family is from.

..it's funny (ironic) that probably in the early days of settlement, the emancipted convicts wanted to remove themselves from the stigma and stain of their convict heritage, yet now, most people tracing their ancestry hope they are descended from the convicts, rather than from figures of authority.



Exactly many sites in Tasmania were almost destroyed by the government and for many years my father denied the fact we had a convict heritage . So many people try to claim it now that instead of 11 ships in the first fleet therewould have to be 100 ships if everyone was honest.

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Re: Australian ATU'ers

Post  Old Mack on Fri Feb 24, 2012 5:31 pm

Nah Ville Sky Chick wrote:It looks like a good read so far,....
Any update ???


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Re: Australian ATU'ers

Post  Nah Ville Sky Chick on Sat Feb 25, 2012 6:44 am

Hi Mack

Yes it 's very good, I am learning a lot. The first bit about the Aborigines shocked me quite a lot, as I did not really know much about them other than a little bit we were taught at school. I also enjoyed the chapter on the convicts themselves and again was suprised at how petty their crimes were.

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Re: Australian ATU'ers

Post  Doc Watson on Sat Feb 25, 2012 7:31 am

Yes some of the crimes would not even rate a gaol term these days.

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Re: Australian ATU'ers

Post  pinhedz on Mon Feb 27, 2012 2:07 pm

Are there more Australians who can't swim--or just one?

http://acrosstheuniverse.forummotion.com/t291-doc-watson-the-swimmer


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Re: Australian ATU'ers

Post  Doc Watson on Mon Feb 27, 2012 2:15 pm

pinhedz wrote:Are there more Australians who can't swim--or just one?

http://acrosstheuniverse.forummotion.com/t291-doc-watson-the-swimmer

Depite it being a land of wonderful beaches and many Olympic swimmers I am certainly not the onlt Australian who is a poor swimmer . Many just do not learn.

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Re: Australian ATU'ers

Post  pinhedz on Wed Feb 13, 2013 2:55 am

Minnesota is called "The land of 10,000 lakes" (it actually has 14,000--the result of glacial melting) so swimming is mandatory. bounce

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Re: Australian ATU'ers

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sat Nov 15, 2014 7:36 pm

“Watch your caboose, Dix.” As a general rule, I hate Star Trek movies. Trek is primarily about the exploration of the human condition, and it’s much harder to do that in a two-hour movie, especially in the post-Star Wars age of spectacle. Every once in a while you get a decent movie out of it—The Wrath of Khan, e.g., which had some powerful themes about aging and consequences of past actions, plus a superlative villain—but mostly you get high-octane stuff that barely qualifies as Star Trek. There’s a reason why you rarely see any of the movies in a list of finest Trek tales.

This movie, though, works, both as a spectacle and as a Star Trek story.

Regarding the former, one of the issues many of the Trek films have had is that, after The Motion Picture—the budget for which is the textbook definition of “bloated”—Paramount refused to commit significant dollars to a Trek film. None of the TNG movies had a budget over $60 million. Here, though, the low budget is camouflaged by having the big-budget ’splosions all happen in the first twenty minutes or so. The heavy action of the battle against the Borg carries the weight for the rest of the film, which is actually very claustrophobic and low-budget—but still tense and enjoyable.



Trek at its best isn’t about how great humanity is but how great humanity aspires to be and can be—but also that we still have flaws that we need to overcome. Picard has to go on a journey in this film, getting past the trauma of his assimilation by the Borg. Cochrane has to go through one of his own, as he’s confronted with the foreknowledge of the consequences of his little experiment, which are far greater than he ever expected.

The pacing of the movie is superb. No time is wasted, as we plow right into the action, and it doesn’t let up. Picard’s obsession grows as the film goes on, most notably in his cathartic shooting of the Borg on the holodeck. And the film has so many nice little scenes: Data calmly getting shot by Sloane, Cochrane and Troi being spectacularly drunk, Barclay fangoobering, the EMH cameo, “You broke your little ships,” and that great final moment when the aliens everyone’s been talking about turn out to be (of course) Vulcans.




I would like to address a couple of issues that others have criticized this film for. One is the alleged absurdity of having some woman we’ve never met be the one to have the come-to-Jesus speech with Picard, that it should’ve been Crusher or Worf rather than Sloane who whupped him upside the head. But the thing is, we’ve spent years having Picard always be right, always be in charge, and the crew has come to trust him implicitly. Because he is Jean-Luc Picard, Crusher and Worf aren’t going to question him—at least not more than once or twice. It requires an outsider’s perspective to see that he’s being an ass.



Some of the more strident fans have complained that the Zefram Cochrane of First Contact isn’t consistent with the one we met in “Metamorphosis.” Beyond the obvious—James Cromwell is seven inches taller than Glenn Corbett—Corbett’s Cochrane was far more reserved than the drunken lout of First Contact. The thing is, Corbett’s Cochrane was someone who a) had lived his entire life, much of it as the hero Cromwell’s Cochrane hadn’t become yet and b) had then after that lived for two centuries alone on a planetoid with only a giant floating omelette for company. Honestly, it would’ve been far more ridiculous for the character Riker and the others interact with to be exactly like the one Kirk met.

Not that there aren’t legitimate complaints to be made. There’s not enough for the ensemble beyond Picard and Data to do (a perpetual problem with the TNG films), and the holodeck diversion seems utterly absurd. Why not just go into the holodeck and have the computer give him a Tommy gun? Did we really need to have silly costumed drama in the midst of the ship under siege? The movie actually had some legitimate comic relief to alleviate the tension of the Borg attack, there was no need to insert that particular bit of nonsense.




This movie has a lot in common with the second go-round for Kirk’s crew: sequel to an episode of the TV show it spun off of, resonating with Moby-Dick, dealing with revenge and consequences, and so on. But unlike the next TNG movie attempt to channel The Wrath of Khan two movies later (Nemesis), they didn’t just ape the structure of the 1982 film and hope for the best. First Contact took thematic rather than structural lessons from TWOK, and is a better movie for it.

But most importantly? This movie established the critical importance of Steppenwolf’s “Magic Carpet Ride” to the history of the Star Trek universe. That was quite possibly the single greatest moment in any of the Trek movies, one that can be appreciated by anyone who’s taken a long road trip and has to have just right tunes in the tape deck/CD player/iPod on shuffle. I still remember the absolute thrill I got in the theatre in 1996 when the song started as they took off. That, ladies and gentlemen, is how you make your first warp flight. Honestly, the whole movie’s worth it for just that crowning moment of awesome.

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Re: Australian ATU'ers

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