Dancers

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Dancers

Post  Constance on Mon Jan 02, 2012 3:05 am

Nijinski in The Rite of Spring:



The Joffrey Ballet performs The Rite of Spring:

You have to get past the credits on this one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdvIRV_nwIE

The sublime Margo Fontayn and Rudolph Nureyev in Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet:





The balcony scene from Act II of Romeo and Juliet. Stick with it--it takes a while to get to the dancing but when it does, it's a brilliant ballet progression:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HtBRN5BXt6o

That's all for now! More to come.

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Re: Dancers

Post  Constance on Mon Jan 02, 2012 3:26 am

Julie Kent, American Ballet Theater, Swan Lake:



What can be more beautiful than a ballerina?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WywAjuOaMac

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Re: Dancers

Post  Constance on Mon Jan 02, 2012 3:37 am

Baryshnikov and Makarova:




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Re: Dancers

Post  eddie on Mon Jan 02, 2012 3:46 am

What can be more beautiful than a ballerina?

Van Morrison agrees.

This, from one of my fave albums: Astral Weeks:

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=youtube+van+morrison+ballerina&qpvt=youtube+van+morrison+ballerina&mid=BEC01D24BDFB6C93EBCDBEC01D24BDFB6C93EBCD&FORM=LKVR4#
Ballerina- Van Morrison.

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Re: Dancers

Post  Constance on Mon Jan 02, 2012 11:47 am

Nice! I like Van but I didn't know that number.

Here's Van and Dylan in Athens, Crazy Love, 1989. Bob's looking good. Cool

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Re: Dancers

Post  Constance on Mon Jan 02, 2012 11:51 am

Baryshnikov in Don Quixote: Perfection, and amazingly high leaps:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Zy5e0Nk2OE

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Re: Dancers

Post  Constance on Mon Jan 02, 2012 11:55 am

More perfection: Natalia Makarova as the Dying Swan:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_V86TrI-Ba8

I saw her once dancing the role of Juliet.


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Re: Dancers

Post  Constance on Mon Jan 02, 2012 11:58 am

Apollo by George Balanchine. The master of modern ballet. New York City Ballet.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DUNQjjbozF8

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Re: Dancers

Post  Constance on Mon Jan 02, 2012 11:59 am

Apollo:


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Re: Dancers

Post  Constance on Mon Jan 02, 2012 12:02 pm

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in Swingtime:


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Re: Dancers

Post  Constance on Mon Jan 02, 2012 12:06 pm

In Swingtime. Enough to make a curmudgeon smile.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxPgplMujzQ

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Re: Dancers

Post  eddie on Thu Jan 26, 2012 5:29 pm

Royal Ballet star Sergei Polunin quits

The Royal Ballet's youngest ever principal stuns the dance world with abrupt decision to leave the company with immediate effect

Alex Needham

guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 25 January 2012 11.11 GMT


Shock move ... Ukrainian dancer Sergei Polunin has resigned from the Royal Ballet. Photograph: Teri Pengilley

Sergei Polunin, the 21-year-old star of the Royal Ballet, has stunned the dance world by abruptly leaving the company. The Ukrainian dancer, who two years ago became the Royal Ballet's youngest ever principal, told its director Monica Mason on Tuesday afternoon that he was quitting with immediate effect.

Announcing his departure, Mason said: "This has obviously come as a huge shock. Sergei is a wonderful dancer and I have enjoyed watching him tremendously, both on stage and in the studio, over the past few years. I wish him every success in the future."

Following his resignation, on Tuesday night the dancer tweeted: "Just have to go through one night!!! then will make my next moves."

Polunin's dancing has been critically acclaimed for its technical and expressive brilliance, with the Observer's critic Luke Jennings describing him in October as "one of the most gifted dancers of his generation". Others have compared him to Nureyev and Baryshnikov.

His debut as Romeo this spring – the latest in a series of lead roles – had been hotly anticipated.

Born in Kherson in southern Ukraine, Polunin was trained at the State Ballet School in Kiev, before attaining a scholarship with the Royal Ballet school aged 13.

This month, he told the Guardian: "I would have liked to behave badly, to play football. I loved sport. But all my family were working for me to succeed. My mother had moved to Kiev to be with me – we lived in one room together. There was no chance of me failing."

However, in the course of the interview Polunin suggested that he would like to retire at 28. He co-owns a tattoo parlour in north London.

On Friday Polunin is due to dance in Men in Motion, a programme at Sadler's Wells focusing on male dancers.

He was due to take the lead in The Dream at the Royal Ballet next week. The role is now likely to be danced by Steven McRae.

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Re: Dancers

Post  eddie on Thu Jan 26, 2012 5:35 pm

eddie wrote:He co-owns a tattoo parlour in north London.

Mr Polunin lists amongst his other hobbies beer and nightclubs. drunken

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Re: Dancers

Post  eddie on Thu Jan 26, 2012 6:06 pm

Royal Ballet 'shocked' by Sergei Polunin resignation

Twitter feed of Royal's youngest ever principal, who was compared to Nureyev and Baryshnikov, had suggested dissatisfaction

Alex Needham

guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 25 January 2012 19.49 GMT


Sergei Polunin performing in Rhapsody by the Royal Ballet at the Royal Opera House, London. Photograph: Alastair Muir/Rex Features

When Sergei Polunin, 21, walked out of rehearsals with the Royal Ballet on Tuesday and said he would not be coming back, the world of dance was stunned.

The next day, the Ukrainian dancer was rehearsing for three shows this weekend at Sadler's Wells after spending the night at the London Tattoo Company, the tattoo parlour in north London he co-owns.

Tamara Rojo, who partnered Polunin to great acclaim in Marguerite and Armand in October, said on Wednesday the Royal Ballet was "shocked … I really don't understand it. He was a joy to work with – lovely and generous in the studio, and really engaged – not just technically but dramatically. You could see the performance and the character straight away when we worked on Marguerite and Armand. Every gesture from the beginning had a meaning and a real commitment."

In a statement, the Royal Ballet's director Monica Mason said the news was "a huge shock". Two years previously, she had made Polunin the company's youngest ever principal. This season, Mason's last at the Royal Ballet, had seen Polunin take a number of lead roles, including Oberon in The Dream, which he was due to dance next week.

"He's very young and he achieved a lot very quickly and I don't know how that might feel – to be that gifted and have so many expecting so much of you from so early," said Rojo. "I think the management of the Royal Ballet were always willing to adapt to his specificities and how he was feeling."

Polunin is said to have recently split up with his girlfriend Helen Crawford, a first soloist with the Royal Ballet. Though he had been on a contract, the Royal Ballet announced his departure immediately. Later on Tuesday evening, Polunin tweeted: "Just have to go through one night!!! then will make my next moves."

The dancer's technical and expressive brilliance had led dance critics to compare him to Nureyev and Baryshnikov, while the Observer's dance critic Luke Jennings described him in October as "one of the most gifted dancers of his generation."

Lauren Cuthbertson, who recently danced with him in Manon, said: "Sergei is a beast. I was doing these jetés with him and thinking, 'Wow, dancing with a guy normally I feel very restricted. This is how I'd do it if I was partnering myself'." In a hotly anticipated performance, the pair had been due to dance Romeo and Juliet at the Royal Ballet this spring.

Polunin's Twitter feed had given clues to a growing dissatisfaction with the regimented and gruelling world of ballet. On 8 January at 9.40am, he tweeted a picture of himself with his feet up drinking from a can of Kronenbourg, with the words: "As long as you have a beer in your hand by the morning!!!!"

A month earlier, he had tweeted: "Does any body sell heroin??? Need to bring my mood up." Though he added 20 minutes later: "Pizza probably will do for now," it is the kind of joke unlikely to have gone down well with the Royal Ballet.

But rumours that he was showing a lack of commitment behind the scenes were denied by the company, who pointed to the ecstatic reviews he had recently received. Rojo added: "He was doing his work – his performances had been consistently exceptional. I honestly don't understand."

Polunin was born in Kherson, a ship-building port in southern Ukraine, where, he said, "ballet didn't exist". Just before Christmas, he told the Guardian's Judith Mackrell that he had been pushed into ballet by his parents, who were very poor and saw it as an opportunity to attain a better life. He said he would like to retire at 28.

His mother enrolled him in a school which she knew sent pupils to the State Ballet school in Kiev, where he was accepted. He told Mackrell: "I would have liked to behave badly, to play football. I loved sport. But all my family were working for me to succeed. My mother had moved to Kiev to be with me. There was no chance of me failing."

Polunin arrived at the Royal Ballet school aged 13, helped by a couple from Grimsby who had got to know him in Ukraine and were willing to take responsibility for him in Britain.

By the age of 17, Polunin was stealing the show in minor roles with the Royal Ballet and he was made principal two years later.

Polunin's Twitter profile hints that he may have been poached by another company: it reads "Principal dancer of ?" Ballet world rumours suggest that the Mikhailovsky Ballet in St Petersburg, run by the oligarch Vladimir Kekhman, would be able to pay him considerably more than he receives at the Royal Ballet, though it would be a considerable breach of ballet etiquette to recruit someone mid-season.

Though the Royal Ballet removed the performances he'd been scheduled to give from its website the following day, balletomanes are still holding out hope that Polunin's departure is a temporary meltdown rather than marking the end of his dancing career. A spokesman for Sadler's Wells said that Polunin would fulfil his commitments there by performing in the show Men in Motion this weekend.

"I truly believe he's an exceptional artist and I don't believe they come along that often – every three generations, maybe," said Rojo. "I really hope that whatever it is that he has to go through he does, and that he can come back to dance because he will be a terrible loss."

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Re: Dancers

Post  eddie on Thu Jan 26, 2012 6:12 pm

Ballet's men step out of the shadows

No pointe shoes, more freedom and very big leaps … the stars behind an all-male ballet tell Judith Mackrell why men are having a moment

Judith Mackrell

guardian.co.uk, Sunday 15 January 2012 21.31 GMT


‘Men can be anything’ … (from left) Ivan Putrov and Sergei Polunin. Photograph: Teri Pengilley for the Guardian

Ivan Putrov has danced a lot of princes in his time. Too many perhaps. The 19th-century classics remain a touchstone in the ballet repertory, with the man often required to provide little more than gallant support: doing the heavy lifting and moving with a muscular heft that contrasts with a woman's lightness, detail and speed. But Putrov believes male dancers are now entering a golden age. "We have come out of the shadow of the ballerina," says the former Royal Ballet principal. "Over the last 100 years, there has been a transformation. Men are no longer just princes – they can be anything."

This is no small claim from someone who, as a boy, had no real desire to dance; his mother tricked him into auditioning for the Kiev ballet school. But the 31-year-old is so convinced of this sea change that he has programmed an (almost) all-male event, Men in Motion, which opens in London later this month. Putrov's programme will span a century of choreography and boast an international cast, including Putrov, the Argentinian prodigy Daniel Proietto, and Sergei Polunin, the Royal's 21-year-old wunderkind.

We meet in a rehearsal studio at Sadler's Wells in London, where Putrov and Polunin are discussing their own experiences on the ballet stage. Dressed in jeans, they could pass for brothers: same broad forehead, same grey-green eyes, same floppy dark hair. The connections go deeper still, since both were born in Ukraine and trained in Kiev before coming to London.

I'm curious to know whether, as young boys, dance had seemed a natural vocation. In Britain, pockets of resistance remain to the idea of boys dancing, for all the impact of Billy Elliot and the success of performers such as Akram Khan. In the former USSR, however, it has always been a far more acceptable career for men. How did they get started? "My mother was a ballerina," says Putrov. "My dad was a soloist in the same company and every other day I was in the theatre." He wanted to be different, and even when he was awarded a place at the Kiev, spent his first year vowing that he would never set foot on stage. Still, he kept coming top of his class, and eventually bagged the coveted role of the child in the popular Ukraine ballet The Forest Song. "I could feel the audience, the music and that was it."

A decade later, Polunin found himself in the same role. It took him even longer to fall for the magic of the stage, he says. His parents were very poor and his mother pushed him into dance, because "it was a way for me and my family to move on to a better life". This notion was completely foreign to a boy from Kherson, a remote town in Ukraine. "In my city, ballet didn't exist." But he had done some training as a gymnast and the auditioning panel in Kiev recognised a raw talent.

Polunin looks sad for a moment. "I would have liked to behave badly, to play football. I loved sport. But all my family were working for me to succeed. My mother had moved to Kiev to be with me – we lived in one room together. There was no chance of me failing." His determination eventually led to a scholarship with the Royal Ballet school at the age of 13. As he matured, he became less competitive, learning to appreciate the artistry of ballet. "Now I am much more interested in the emotion and the drama."

Some of the men I have interviewed will admit to an envy of their female peers, who get to dance Giselle, Aurora, Odette/Odile. There have even been confessions of tutu-envy. Not these two. "I wouldn't go through the agony of the pointe shoe," grins Putrov. And even though, in those classics, the man does the lifting and has far less material to dance, both claim the experience can be liberating. While women have to perform their solo variations just as the choreographer decrees, men are allowed to deliver their own preferred versions of pirouettes or leaps.

Polunin says there are few physical thrills to compare with the exhilaration of soaring up into the apex of a huge leap. "When you're going a bit higher than you think you normally can, and you can feel the adrenaline and excitement of the public, that's really great."

They say there are more than enough works in the 20th and 21st-century repertories that allow a "man to be the equal of the woman, or even more important". Ballets by MacMillan or Ashton offer complicated, funny or powerful male characters; there are moments in works by Wayne McGregor where the sexual coding diminishes almost to vanishing point.

Putrov dates the start of this expansion to a precise moment in 1911, when "Vaslav Nijinsky made himself a legend by jumping through the window in Spectre de la Rose". In that work, by Sergei Diaghilev's Ballet Russes, Nijinsky was an exquisite, perfumed, hovering creature. Off stage, he was also Diaghilev's lover. It was Diaghilev's eye for male beauty that encouraged the creation of so many ballets in which men were placed centre stage and allowed to dance with as much sensuality and poetry as women. As Putrov points out: "Men were liberated on stage at the same time that women were given the vote."

Despite the Diaghilev revolution, it can still be hard for dancers to escape the type casting of traditional ballet. Polunin points to all those moments that, for him, have transcended those norms – among them, the tender, tempestuous and vulnerable chemistry he discovered with Tamara Rojo last year, when they danced Ashton's Marguerite and Armand together.

In his 12 years at the Royal Ballet, Putrov became a virtuoso of polished finesse: his jumps were a flash of steel, a rush of displaced air. Two of the most important roles of his career have ranged far outside macho parameters: the naively romantic Lensky in John Cranko's Onegin, and Pierrot Lunaire, the moonstruck modernist clown in Glen Tetley's 1962 setting of the Schoenberg score. It's this range Putrov has tried to reflect in Men in Motion, which begins with Spectre and closes with Russell Maliphant's 2009 modern dance solo AfterLight; in between, there is Narcisse (danced by Polunin), a solo by the Soviet choreographer Goleizovsky, and Ashton's Dance of the Blessed Spirits.

Putrov has also choreographed a new work, his first significant creation for the ballet stage. Titled Ithaca, after the Cavafy poem, and set to Paul Dukas's La Peri, it's a ballet he is too modest – and too apprehensive – to talk about, beyond enthusing about the set, by the artist Gary Hume.

Putrov has no plans, he says, to switch to choreography full-time. On the contrary, he plans to dance for as long as his body allows – another aspect, he says, of the good times men are enjoying. "We can perform for so much longer now. Dancing may be hard on us physically: when we jump, the joints take all the impact. We use our bodies to an extreme, like athletes. But an athlete burns out when he is about 25. A dancer, if he has good schooling, can go on for much longer. The career has changed."

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Re: Dancers

Post  eddie on Thu Jan 26, 2012 6:16 pm




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Re: Dancers

Post  eddie on Sat Mar 03, 2012 9:49 am

English National Ballet comes to Tate Britain – in pictures

English National Ballet's week-long residency at Tate Britain celebrates Pablo Picasso's collaboration with the Ballets Russes and coincides with the Tate's Picasso & Modern British Art exhibition. The residency culminates in a performance of three specially-devised ballets on 2 March

guardian.co.uk, Friday 2 March 2012 17.26 GMT

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Re: Dancers

Post  eddie on Sat Mar 03, 2012 9:50 am


English National Ballet's residency at Tate Britain coincides with the Picasso & Modern British Art exhibition. Photograph: David Levene

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Re: Dancers

Post  eddie on Sat Mar 03, 2012 9:53 am


Inspired by Picasso's costume and set design work with the Ballets Russes in 1919, the residency saw dancers rehearsing in the gallery. Photograph: David Levene

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Re: Dancers

Post  eddie on Sat Mar 03, 2012 9:56 am


The residency also celebrated English National Ballet's Beyond Ballets Russes season. Photograph: David Levene

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Re: Dancers

Post  eddie on Sat Mar 03, 2012 10:01 am


Picasso collaborated with the Ballets Russes from 1916, designing several ballets including Parade and Pulcinella. Photograph: David Levene

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Re: Dancers

Post  eddie on Sat Mar 03, 2012 10:06 am


The week-long residency included participatory workshops, talks, ballet classes, rehearsals and performances. Photograph: David Levene

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Re: Dancers

Post  eddie on Sat Mar 03, 2012 10:10 am


It also gave audiences the opportunity to draw and paint from life. Photo: David Levene

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Re: Dancers

Post  eddie on Sat Mar 03, 2012 10:16 am


Members of the audience sketched a ballet class in the Duveen Gallery at Tate Britain. Photograph: David Levene

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Re: Dancers

Post  eddie on Sat Mar 03, 2012 10:19 am


The programme featured the full company of 67 dancers taking their morning ballet class along a barre stretching the length of the gallery. Photograph: David Levene

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