Francisco de Goya

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Francisco de Goya

Post  eddie on Tue Dec 20, 2011 1:18 pm

Dashing through the snow: Francisco de Goya's Snowstorm (La Nevada)

In the latest of his series of favourite wintry artworks, Jonathan Jones admires the compassion and elegance of Goya's Snowstorm, an oil-painted paean to Spain's heroic underclass.

guardian.co.uk, Monday 19 December 2011 13.02 GMT



This is actually one of Goya’s more lighthearted scenes. It is not one of the great Spanish artist’s nightmarish ‘black paintings’ of witches and savage gods but a design for a tapestry, done just after he became royal painter in 1786. But Goya is never merely decorative. Instead of a simple scene of fun in the snow, he proposes to decorate a palace with an acutely real and compassionate depiction of the poor toiling in bitter weather. While you keep warm with your fires and wines, he reminds his royal patron, others tread wearily through the deepest winter. Classical elegance and simplicity give his freezing workers a stark heroism

Photograph: Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid

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Re: Francisco de Goya

Post  eddie on Tue Dec 20, 2011 1:21 pm


The Third of May 1808, 1814. Oil on canvas, 266 х 345 cm. Museo del Prado, Madrid.

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Re: Francisco de Goya

Post  eddie on Tue Dec 20, 2011 1:24 pm


The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters, c. 1797, 21.5 cm × 15 cm. One of the most famous prints of the Caprichos.

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Re: Francisco de Goya

Post  eddie on Tue Dec 20, 2011 1:27 pm


The Nude Maja, ca. 1800. Said to be the first explicit depiction of female pubic hair in a large Western painting, though others had hinted at it before.

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Re: Francisco de Goya

Post  eddie on Tue Dec 20, 2011 1:30 pm


Yard with Lunatics, 1794. Oil on tin-plated iron, 43.8 x 32.7 cm.

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Re: Francisco de Goya

Post  eddie on Tue Dec 20, 2011 1:33 pm


What more can one do?, from The Disasters of War, 1812–15.

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Re: Francisco de Goya

Post  eddie on Tue Dec 20, 2011 1:36 pm


Witches' Sabbath or Aquelarre is one of 14 from the Black Paintings series.

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Re: Francisco de Goya

Post  eddie on Tue Dec 20, 2011 1:39 pm


Goya's portrait of the Duke of Wellington, the liberator of Madrid from Napoleonic rule.

He captures a few thing about the Duke:

1. He had no ear-lobes.
2. He had to shave about 4 times a day.
3. The Spanish sun gave him a red face, from which a hat shielded his forehead, which the artist depicts as being comparatively pale.

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Re: Francisco de Goya

Post  Guest on Tue Dec 20, 2011 9:41 pm

I remember posting this on ATUI

That I saw the black paintings when I was 12 and they impressed me, especially The Dog



(Wiki) The painting is often seen a symbolic depiction of man's futile struggle against malevolent forces; the black sloping mass which envelopes the dog is imagined to be quicksand, earth or some other material in which the dog has become buried. Having struggled unsuccessfully to free itself, it can now do nothing but look skywards hoping for a divine intervention that will never come. The vast swathe of "sky" which makes up the bulk of the picture intensifies the feeling of the dog's isolation and the hopelessness of its situation.


Spanish painter Antonio Saura thought The Dog "the world's most beautiful picture" (el cuadro más bello del mundo), and his contemporary, Rafael Canogar referred to it as a "visual poem" and cited it as the first Symbolist painting of the Western world. Picasso was a great admirer of the Black Paintings (though he did not single out the The Dog in particular), and Joan Miro requested to see two paintings on his final visit to the Prado: The Dog and Velázquez's Las Meninas, which he held in equal regard. Manuela Mena, curator at the Prado, claimed: "There is not a single contemporary painter in the world that does not pray in front of The Dog".

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