The Eleven Free Nations of U.S.A. (fiat sirupus)

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The Eleven Free Nations of U.S.A. (fiat sirupus)

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sun Dec 04, 2011 10:59 pm

Yankeedom

Yankeedom was founded on Massachusetts Bay by radical Calvinists as a religious utopia in the New England wilderness. From the outset, there was emphasis on education, local political control and the pursuit of the greater good, even if it required individual self-denial. Yankees have the greatest faith in government’s ability to improve lives. For more than four centuries, Yankees have sought to build a more perfect society here on earth through social engineering, extensive citizen involvement in the political process and the aggressive assimilation of foreigners.

Settled by stable, educated families, Yankeedom has always had a middle-class ethos and considerable respect for intellectual achievement. Its religious zeal has waned over time, but not its underlying “secular Puritanism” or drive to improve the world.

From its New England core, Yankee culture spread with its settlers across upper New York state, the northern strips of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Iowa; parts of the eastern Dakotas; and on up to Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota and the Canadian Maritimes. It has been locked in perpetual combat with the Deep South for control of the federal government since the moment such a thing existed.

New Netherland

The 17th-century Dutch colony of New Netherland had a lasting impact by laying down the cultural DNA for New Amsterdam (now Greater New York City) that was, from the start, a global commercial trading society. Multiethnic, multireligious, speculative, materialistic, mercantile and free-trading, the future metropolis was a raucous, not entirely democratic city- state where no one ethnic or religious group has ever been truly in charge. It nurtured two innovations considered subversive: a profound tolerance of diversity and an unflinching commitment to freedom. Forced upon other nations at the Constitutional Convention, these ideals have been passed on to us as the Bill of Rights.

New Netherland has retained its fundamental values and societal model, having long reigned as the leading world center of Western commerce, finance and publishing. But its territory has shrunk over the centuries. Today, the five boroughs of New York City, the lower Hudson Valley, northern New Jersey, western Long Island and southwestern Connecticut comprise New Netherland. The most densely inhabited part of North America, its population -- 19 million at this writing -- is greater than that of many European nations, and its influence over this continent’s media, publishing, fashion, intellectual and economic life is hard to overstate.

The Midlands

Arguably the most “American” of the nations, the Midlands was founded by English Quakers on the shores of Delaware Bay. Pluralistic and organized around the middle class, the Midlands spawned the culture of Middle America and the Heartland, where ethnic and ideological purity have never been a priority, government has been seen as an unwelcome intrusion, and political opinion has been moderate, even apathetic. Long an ethnic mosaic, with people of German descent -- not Anglo-Saxons -- making up the largest group since the 1600s, the Midlands includes those who, like Yankees, believe society should be organized to benefit ordinary people, but they are skeptical of top-down government intervention, as many of their ancestors fled from European tyrannies. The Midlands is home to a dialect long considered “standard American,” a bellwether for national political attitudes and the key swing vote in every national debate from the abolition of slavery to the 2008 presidential contest.

From its cultural hearth in southeastern Pennsylvania, southern New Jersey, and northern Delaware and Maryland, Midland culture spread through much of the heartland: central Ohio, Indiana and Illinois; northern Missouri; most of Iowa; and the less-arid eastern halves of South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas. It shares the key border cities of Chicago (with Yankeedom) and St. Louis (with Greater Appalachia, a nation to be discussed in a later installment). It also has an important extension in southern Ontario, where many Midlanders emigrated after the American Revolution, forming the central core of English- speaking Canada. Although less concerned with its national identity, the Midlands is, nonetheless, an enormously influential moderating force in continental politics, as it agrees with only part of its neighbors’ strident agendas.

Tidewater

Tidewater was the most powerful nation during the colonial period and the Early Republic. It has always been a fundamentally conservative region where a high value is placed on respect for authority and tradition and very little on equality or public participation in politics.

Such attitudes aren’t surprising, given that it was founded by the younger sons of southern English gentry, who aimed to reproduce the semi-feudal, manorial society of the English countryside, where economic, political and social affairs were run by and for landed aristocrats. These self-identified “Cavaliers” largely succeeded in their aims, turning the lowlands of Virginia, Maryland, southern Delaware and northeastern North Carolina into a country gentleman’s paradise with indentured servants and, later, slaves taking the part of the peasants.

Tidewater elites played a central role in the foundation of the U.S. and are responsible for many of the aristocratic inflections of the Constitution, including the Electoral College and Senate, whose members were to be appointed by legislators, not chosen by the electorate.

But the region’s power waned in the 1830s and 1840s, its elite generally following the lead of the planters of the ascendant Deep South in matters of national political importance. Today, it is a nation in decline, rapidly losing its influence, cultural cohesion and territory to its Midland neighbors. Its undoing was a matter of geography: It was blocked by rivals from expanding over the Appalachian Mountains.

Greater Appalachia

Greater Appalachia was founded in the early 18th century by wave upon wave of rough, bellicose settlers from the war-ravaged borderlands of northern Ireland, northern England and the Scottish lowlands. Lampooned in popular culture as “rednecks,” “hillbillies,” “crackers” and “white trash,” these clannish Scots-Irish, Scots and northern English frontiersmen spread across the highland South and on into the southern tiers of Ohio, Indiana and Illinois; the Arkansas and Missouri Ozarks; the eastern two-thirds of Oklahoma; and the Hill Country of Texas, clashing with Indians, Mexicans and Yankees as they migrated.

In the British Isles, this culture had formed in a state of near-constant war and upheaval, fostering a warrior ethic and a deep commitment to individual liberty and personal sovereignty. Intensely suspicious of aristocrats and social reformers alike, these American borderlanders despised Yankee teachers, Tidewater lords and Deep Southern aristocrats.

In the Civil War, much of the region fought for the Union, with secessionist movements in western Virginia (creating West Virginia), eastern Tennessee and northern Alabama. During Reconstruction, the region resisted the Yankee effort to liberate African slaves, driving it into a lasting alliance with its former enemies: the overlords of the Tidewater and Deep Southern lowlands of Dixie.

The borderlanders’ combative culture has provided a large proportion of the nation’s military, from officers such as Andrew Jackson, Davy Crockett and Douglas MacArthur to the enlisted men fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq. They also gave the continent bluegrass and country music, stock-car racing and evangelical fundamentalism.

The Deep South

The Deep South, by contrast, was founded by Barbados slave lords as a West Indies-style slave society, a system so despotic and cruel that it shocked even 17th-century English observers. For most of American history, the region has been a bastion of white supremacy and aristocratic privilege, while enslavement has been the natural lot of many. It remains the least democratic of the regions, a one-party entity where race remains the primary determinant of one’s political affiliations.

Beginning from its Charleston beachhead, the Deep South spread apartheid and authoritarianism across the Southern lowlands, eventually encompassing most of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Florida and Louisiana; western Tennessee; and the southeastern parts of North Carolina, Arkansas and Texas. With its territorial ambitions in Latin America frustrated, it dragged the U.S. into a horrific war in the 1860s in order to form its own nation state, backed by reluctant allies in Tidewater and some corners of Appalachia.

After successfully resisting a Yankee-led occupation, it became the center of the states-rights movement and racial segregation, as well as labor and environmental deregulation. It is also the wellspring of African-American culture in America and, 40 years after it was forced to allow blacks to vote, it remains politically polarized on racial grounds.

El Norte

Thanks to the influence of the great 19th century Yankee historians, we traditionally think of U.S. history as European settlement of the continent, progressing from the beachheads of Massachusetts and Virginia to the shores of the Pacific. But the story of the Euro-American nations truly began way before the Pilgrims, when European colonial forces arrived in our hemisphere in the late 15th century, borne by Spain’s soldiers and missionaries.

Because it was then the world’s superpower, Spain had a head start on its 16th-century rivals, and in 1493 was granted ownership of almost the entire Western Hemisphere (16 million square miles) by Pope Alexander VI. By the time the first Englishmen stepped off the boat at Jamestown, Spanish explorers had trekked through what would be Kansas, beheld the Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee and North Carolina, and surveyed the Grand Canyon. They had established colonies on the shores of what are now Georgia and Virginia and, in Florida, founded the city of St. Augustine.

Indeed, the oldest European subculture in the U.S. is in the arid hills of northern New Mexico and Southern Colorado -- a region, El Norte, where people of Spanish heritage have been living since 1595. They remain fiercely protective of their Spanish heritage, taking umbrage at being lumped in with Mexican-Americans who appeared in the region only in the 19th and 20th centuries. Their leaders’ passion for genealogy rivals that of Mayflower descendants. Subsequently, the Spanish Empire set up additional colonial settlements across its northern frontier from south Texas to the central California coast.

Today, this rapidly growing nation spreads from the U.S.- Mexico border for a hundred miles or more in both directions, encompassing south and west Texas, southern California and the Imperial Valley, southern Arizona, most of New Mexico and parts of Colorado, as well as the Mexican states of Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, Chihuahua, Sonora and Baja California. Overwhelmingly Hispanic, it has long been a hybrid of Anglo and Spanish America, with an economy oriented toward the U.S.

The people of Mexico’s northern border states are seen, by other Mexicans, as overly Americanized. Nortenos (northerners) have a well-earned reputation for being more independent, self- sufficient and adaptable than Mexicans from the hierarchical society of Mexico’s more densely populated core. Long a hotbed of Democratic reform and revolutionary sentiment, the northern Mexican states have more in common with the Hispanic borderlands of the southwestern U.S. -- historically, culturally, economically and gastronomically -- than with the rest of Mexico.

Split by an increasingly militarized border, El Norte, in some ways, resembles Germany during the Cold War: Two populations with a common culture are separated by a large wall. Despite the wishes of their political leaders in Washington and Mexico City, many residents of El Norte would prefer to form a third national state of their own. Charles Truxillo, a professor of Chicano studies at the University of New Mexico, has predicted that such a sovereign state, a “La Republica del Norte,” will be a reality by the end of the 21st century.

Whether or not this comes to pass, El Norte will be an increasingly influential force within the U.S. The Pew Research Center predicts that, by 2050, 29 percent of the U.S. population will self-identify as Hispanic -- more than double the 2005 figure. And much of that growth will take place in El Norte.

The Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes has predicted that, so long as tolerance prevails, the borderlands will become an amalgamated, interdependent culture rather soon. “I have always said it is a scar, not a border,” he has said. “But we don’t want the scar to bleed again. We want the scar to heal.”

New France

Another independence-inclined nation is New France, which can trace its origins to the fall of 1604 -- 16 years before the Mayflower’s voyage. Today, New France is the most overtly nationalistic of the 11 nations, and already has a nation-state- in-waiting: the province of Quebec.

New French culture blends the folkways of ancien regime northern French peasantry with the traditions and values of the aboriginal people whom the French explorers and colonists encountered in northeastern North America. Down-to-earth, egalitarian and consensus-driven, the New French are far and away the most liberal people on the continent, recent polls have shown. Long oppressed by their British overlords, the New French have, since the mid-20th century, imparted many of their attitudes on the Canadian federation.

Today, New France includes the lower third of Quebec, northern and northeastern New Brunswick and the Acadian (or “Cajun”) enclaves of southern Louisiana. (New Orleans is a border city, mixing New French and Deep Southern elements.) Securing an independent state will require, first, negotiating a partition of Quebec with the inhabitants of First Nation.

The Left Coast

A Chile-shaped nation pinned between the Pacific Ocean and the Cascade and Coast mountain ranges, the Left Coast extends north from Monterey, California, to Juneau, Alaska, and includes four decidedly progressive metropolises: San Francisco, Portland, Seattle and Vancouver. A wet region of staggering natural beauty, this region was colonized by two groups: New England merchants, missionaries and woodsmen arrived by sea and gained control of the coastal towns, and farmers, prospectors and fur traders from Greater Appalachia arrived by wagon and dominated the countryside.

Originally slated to become a “New England on the Pacific” -- and the target of a dedicated Yankee missionary effort -- the Left Coast retained a strong strain of New England intellectualism and idealism even as it embraced a culture of individual fulfillment.

Today, it combines Yankee faith in good government and social reform with a commitment to individual self-exploration and discovery, a fecund combination. The Left Coast has been the birthplace of the modern environmental movement and the global information revolution. It is home to Microsoft, Google, Amazon, Apple, Twitter and Silicon Valley. And it has been a co-founder (along with New Netherland) of the gay rights movement, the peace movement and the 1960s cultural revolution.

Ernest Callenbach’s 1975 sci-fi novel, “Ecotopia,” imagined the U.S. portion of the region as having broken off into a separate, environmentally stable nation at odds with the rest of the continent. A modern secessionist movement seeks to create the sovereign state of Cascadia by adding in British Columbia and southern Alaska as well, forming a “bioregional cooperative commonwealth.” Yankeedom’s closest ally, the Left Coast battles constantly against the libertarian-corporate agenda of its neighbor, the Far West.

The Far West

Climate and geography have shaped all the 11 nations to some extent, but the Far West is the only one where environmental factors have truly trumped ethnic ones. High, dry and remote, the interior West presented conditions so severe that they effectively destroyed would-be settlers who tried to apply the farming and lifestyle techniques they had used in Greater Appalachia, the Midlands and other nations. With minor exceptions, this vast region couldn’t be effectively colonized without the deployment of vast industrial resources: railroads, heavy mining equipment, ore smelters, dams and irrigation systems.

As a result, the colonization of much of the region was facilitated and directed by large corporations based in distant New York, Boston, Chicago or San Francisco, or by the federal government itself, which controlled much of the land.

Even if they didn’t work for one of the colonizing companies, settlers were dependent on the railroads for transportation to and from far-off markets and manufacturing centers. Seaboard nations treated the region as an internal colony, exploiting it for their benefit. And the region remains in a state of semi-dependency, despite significant industrialization during the World War II and the Cold War.

Its political class tends to revile the government for interfering in its affairs -- a stance that often aligns it with the Deep South -- while demanding that it continue to receive federal largesse. Yet the Far West rarely challenges its corporate masters, who retain near-Gilded Age levels of influence over the region.

Today, this nation encompasses all of the interior U.S. west of the 100th meridian, from the northern boundary of El Norte up to the southern frontier of First Nation. It includes northern Arizona; the interiors of California, Washington and Oregon; much of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Alaska; portions of the Yukon and the Northwest Territories; the arid western halves of the Dakotas, Nebraska and Kansas; and all or nearly all of Idaho, Montana, Colorado, Utah and Nevada.

First Nation

Like the Far West, First Nation encompasses a vast area with a hostile climate: the boreal forests, tundra and glaciers of the far north. The difference, however, is that the indigenous inhabitants are still in the area -- most of them having never given up their land by treaty -- and still retain cultural practices and knowledge that allow them to survive in the region.

American Indians have recently begun reclaiming their sovereignty. In Alaska and Nunavut, they have won considerable autonomy. And in Greenland, the indigenous people now have a self-governing nation-state, which stands on the threshold of full independence from Denmark. First Nation’s people now have a chance to put native North America back on the map culturally, politically and environmentally.

First Nation is rapidly taking control of large portions of what once were the northern fringes of the Far West, including much of Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Labrador; the entirety of Nunavut and Greenland; the northern tier of Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta; much of northwestern British Columbia; and the northern two-thirds of Quebec.

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Re: The Eleven Free Nations of U.S.A. (fiat sirupus)

Post  pinhedz on Mon Dec 05, 2011 12:24 am

From its New England core, Yankee culture spread with its settlers across upper New York state, the northern strips of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Iowa; parts of the eastern Dakotas; and on up to Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota and the Canadian Maritimes. It has been locked in perpetual combat with the Deep South for control of the federal government since the moment such a thing existed.
On the one hand, that's exactly how I ended up in Minnesota.

On the other hand, the Norskes in Minnesota would protest that "This isn't Yankeedom--this is Vikingdom." bounce


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Re: The Eleven Free Nations of U.S.A. (fiat sirupus)

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sat Feb 18, 2012 12:33 pm

The Northeast and Atlantic accents have in common the omision of the "R" is certain scenarios ( 'yestuhday I was drivin in my cah') which derives from primary England accents ( 'oh really dahling' ).

The Midwestern accent restored the phantom "R" - presumably due to German, Scando, Sottish, Irish peoples setting up camp removed from Northeastern meme propagators.

But how did the Midwestern accent became the standard American accent - when the northeast is the seat of dominion? Did it become the default naturally over time becaus it is a more fitting accent for an 'immigrant nation' becaus words are pronounced more like they are written? Hollywood not being in the Northeast also probab had something to do with it . . .. .. .... . . . .

Tom Wolfe wears faux spats.


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Re: The Eleven Free Nations of U.S.A. (fiat sirupus)

Post  pinhedz on Sat Feb 18, 2012 1:00 pm

user wrote:The Northeast and Atlantic accents have in common the omision of the "R" is certain scenarios ( 'yestuhday I was drivin in my cah') which derives from primary England accents ( 'oh really dahling' ).

The Midwestern accent restored the phantom "R" - presumably due to German, Scando, Sottish, Irish peoples setting up camp removed from Northeastern meme propagators.

But how did the Midwestern accent became the standard American accent - when the northeast is the seat of dominion? Did it become the defaut naturally over time because it is a more fitting accent for an 'immigrant nation' because words are pronounced more like they are written? Hollywood not being in the Northeast also probab had something to do with it . . .. .. .... . . . .

Tom Wolfe wears faux spats.
Some lingologists have attempted to reconstruct the sound of English as it was spoken in the time of Shakespeare, and one of their claims is that the Brits used to pronounce all those R's before they got all languid prissified.

This lead to the conclusion that the best English spoken today can be heard only in the American Midwest and certain parts of the Virginia Highlands.

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Re: The Eleven Free Nations of U.S.A. (fiat sirupus)

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sun Feb 26, 2012 5:21 pm

"I don't have a microphone in my hand. I don't have the video camera. So no one can hear my music. No one can see my art. I have these other aspects of my life that no one knows about. I'm an artist. I'm a musician. Nobody knows that. They just see me as the guy who tried to kill Ronald Reagan," he said.

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Re: The Eleven Free Nations of U.S.A. (fiat sirupus)

Post  Yakima Canutt on Thu May 10, 2012 1:42 pm


May 05, 2012 1:58 PM PST


KANSAS CITY, Missoura. A writhing conglomeration of microscopic party pups dressed as tacos grande, line dancers, Martin Balsam, die Wehrmacht, and other shit fell short of setting a world record, but organizers say they're encouraged by the turnout for the inaugural
Cinco de Mayo Chihuahua Parade & Missale Satanicum.


Organizer Mark Valentine says about 500 pulsing pooches, most of them Chihuahuas, arrived in their finest fancy dress for das blowout Saturday.

That's a few hundred short of the goal of 700, which would have been a record.


Shortly after 11 a.m., Chihuahua-Keepers proudly lifted their tiny beloveds into the air, creating the sea of miniscule cabezas draped in porkpie hats, laser cannons and der Stahlhelme.



Participants then lined up and participated in a leaden procession along a cracked, sunbeat sidewalk, as literally dozens of persons in pastel lawnchairs ogled the cursed animals get they strut on.





Cinco de Mayo has always been a special day for noted actor/collector Nick Cage and his UNESCO godsons Nacho & Chori, two torbellinos furiosos living la vida loca (the mad life) with Atrofia Muscular Espinal (spinal muscular atrophy) and mucha travesura encantadora! bom





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Re: The Eleven Free Nations of U.S.A. (fiat sirupus)

Post  Yakima Canutt on Sat May 19, 2012 10:24 am

Deep South ...


I'm suprized that Grubaker or ObamaGirl88 haven't corrected or objected to the jambonclawed Yanqui steercake revisionist flapclap one will find in the first post's description of the Deep Dish Southern Comforts. All the author has to say here is that Surenosowth is barbados cruel and not terribly fond of coloreds.

Heh how bout South is the heartspurt vidablood fountaincabeza of entire nation? How bout truism that Surenosowthpaw lives at one with the natural world in a way that the agendizing industrialist wudbe_ingsoc Yanqui can never really fathom? From Hugh Swinton Legar to Harper Capote to Henry Timrod to Mitchell Flannery to Cottonsee Williams to John Grisham to Dixon Lanier Junior to Jimmy Buffet to Carson McChopin to Black Dirt Arkansas Oak Devils to Applewhite Faulkner to the one & only Kid Rock and beyond. Also Shelby Dade Foote, Junior. albino





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Re: The Eleven Free Nations of U.S.A. (fiat sirupus)

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Oct 02, 2012 5:26 pm

luser wrote:Indeed, the oldest European subculture in the U.S. is in the arid hills of northern New Mexico and Southern Colorado -- a region, El Norte, where people of Spanish heritage have been living since 1595. They remain fiercely protective of their Spanish heritage, taking umbrage at being lumped in with Mexican-Americans who appeared in the region only in the 19th and 20th centuries. Their leaders’ passion for genealogy rivals that of Mayflower descendants. Subsequently, the Spanish Empire set up additional colonial settlements across its northern frontier from south Texas to the central California coast.

KNO-IT & SHO-IT: this esteemed club includes superstar Eva Longoria.


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Re: The Eleven Free Nations of U.S.A. (fiat sirupus)

Post  Yakima Canutt on Tue Oct 02, 2012 5:34 pm

Who lost the middle class?

That's the question confronting President Obama and Mitt Romney as they march toward voting day. Their answers are predictable: Romney blames regulations and big government; Obama points to policies favoring rich guys like Romney. Sadly for the embattled American middle class, both viewpoints miss the mark.

The great stagnation in median incomes since the early 1990s stems from a failure to calibrate domestic policy to the demands of a rapidly changing world economy. Whether Democrats tax too much or Republicans too little is irrelevant against the sweeping economic disruptions caused by two decades of unprecedented globalization.

Global money flows have grown exponentially as restrictions on trade and investment have eased. But the exchange rates used to price these money flows have become distorted. China's manipulation of its currency has reduced the price of its exports in dollar terms. Meanwhile, the dollar's role as the world's reserve currency has given America access to a colossal amount of cheap credit.

This combination generates a multi-trillion-dollar excess of savings in China and a dangerous dependence on debt-financed consumer spending in the United States. The result: an evisceration of America's competitiveness.



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Re: The Eleven Free Nations of U.S.A. (fiat sirupus)

Post  senorita on Wed Oct 03, 2012 11:29 am

What's the frequency Kenneth?


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Re: The Eleven Free Nations of U.S.A. (fiat sirupus)

Post  pinhedz on Wed Oct 03, 2012 11:44 am

Miss Panties has no power here. Razz


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